Gynaecological surgery after endometrial ablation

Typeset version

 

TY  - JOUR
AU  - Molloy, D. and Taylor, P. T.
PY  - 1994
TI  - Gynaecological surgery after endometrial ablation
AV  - Validated
C1  - Not Avail. ()
NV  - 161
IS  - 10
SP  - 604
EP  - 6
AB  - OBJECTIVE: To determine the number of patients requiring further gynaecological surgery after endometrial ablation. DESIGN: A retrospective 20-26-month follow-up of private patients who underwent endometrial ablation, tracking subsequent surgical procedures through the Medicare database. Data were analysed on a national and State basis. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: 1853 private patients who had had an endometrial ablation from 1 April 1991 to 30 September 1991. Seven different groups of subsequent gynaecological surgical procedures were investigated. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The need for subsequent endometrial ablation, hysterectomy (by any means) and other forms of gynaecological surgery within the defined time period. RESULTS: After initial ablation, 382 patients (21%) required further gynaecological surgery: 10% required hysterectomy; 6% required repeat ablation; and 5% of patients required other gynaecological procedures related to the uterus. These rates for further procedures were generally higher than reported previously after transcervical hysteroscopic endometrial ablation or resection. CONCLUSIONS: Endometrial ablation is associated with a significant medium and long term failure rate, necessitating further intervention. This failure rate may have been previously underestimated, and our higher rate may still be an underestimate.
DA  - 1994/NaN
ER  - 
@article{V235507967,
  author = {Molloy, D. and Taylor, P. T.},
  year = {1994},
  TITLE = {{Gynaecological surgery after endometrial ablation}},
  status = {Validated},
  note = {Citations: {Not Avail. ()}},
  volume = {161},
  number = {10},
  pages = {604--6},
  ABSTRACT = {{OBJECTIVE: To determine the number of patients requiring further gynaecological surgery after endometrial ablation. DESIGN: A retrospective 20-26-month follow-up of private patients who underwent endometrial ablation, tracking subsequent surgical procedures through the Medicare database. Data were analysed on a national and State basis. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: 1853 private patients who had had an endometrial ablation from 1 April 1991 to 30 September 1991. Seven different groups of subsequent gynaecological surgical procedures were investigated. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The need for subsequent endometrial ablation, hysterectomy (by any means) and other forms of gynaecological surgery within the defined time period. RESULTS: After initial ablation, 382 patients (21%) required further gynaecological surgery: 10% required hysterectomy; 6% required repeat ablation; and 5% of patients required other gynaecological procedures related to the uterus. These rates for further procedures were generally higher than reported previously after transcervical hysteroscopic endometrial ablation or resection. CONCLUSIONS: Endometrial ablation is associated with a significant medium and long term failure rate, necessitating further intervention. This failure rate may have been previously underestimated, and our higher rate may still be an underestimate.}},
  source = {IRIS}
}
AUTHORSAUauthorMolloy, D. and Taylor, P. T.
YEARPYyear1994
MONTHC2month
JOURNAL_CODET2journal
TITLETItitleGynaecological surgery after endometrial ablation
STATUSAVstatusValidated
TIMES_CITEDC1citationsNot Avail. ()
SEARCH_KEYWORDKWkeywords
VOLUMENVvolume161
ISSUEISnumber10
START_PAGESPpages604
END_PAGEEPpages6
ABSTRACTABabstractOBJECTIVE: To determine the number of patients requiring further gynaecological surgery after endometrial ablation. DESIGN: A retrospective 20-26-month follow-up of private patients who underwent endometrial ablation, tracking subsequent surgical procedures through the Medicare database. Data were analysed on a national and State basis. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: 1853 private patients who had had an endometrial ablation from 1 April 1991 to 30 September 1991. Seven different groups of subsequent gynaecological surgical procedures were investigated. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The need for subsequent endometrial ablation, hysterectomy (by any means) and other forms of gynaecological surgery within the defined time period. RESULTS: After initial ablation, 382 patients (21%) required further gynaecological surgery: 10% required hysterectomy; 6% required repeat ablation; and 5% of patients required other gynaecological procedures related to the uterus. These rates for further procedures were generally higher than reported previously after transcervical hysteroscopic endometrial ablation or resection. CONCLUSIONS: Endometrial ablation is associated with a significant medium and long term failure rate, necessitating further intervention. This failure rate may have been previously underestimated, and our higher rate may still be an underestimate.
PUBLISHER_LOCATIONCYaddress
ISBN_ISSNSNisbn
EDITIONETedition
URLURurl
DOI_LINKL3doi
FUNDING_BODYM2note
GRANT_DETAILSM2note