CELT document T105009

The genealogy of Corca Laidhe

Witness list

  • L: The Yellow Book of Lecan
  • B: The Book of Ballymote

unknown

Geinealach Chorca Laidhe

English translation

Edited by John O'Donovan

 p.3

Genealogy of Corca Laidhe

The History of the Race of Lughaidh, Son of Ith

Luigh-Ith, 1 i. e. Ith was smaller than his father, for Ith was the name of each of them; and these are the tribe of the Gaeidhil that are not of the sons of Milidh, 2 nor of the Tuatha De Danann, 3 nor of the Fir-Bolg, 4 nor yet of the Clann-Neimhidh; 5 and it may be said that their invasion is not of the seven invasions, 6 for Ith was the first of the Gaeidhil that discovered Eire, 7 and it was through him that the sons of Milidh came to inhabit therein, and widely did his Ith's tribe after him spread throughout Eire 8 and Alba. 9 For it is boasted  p.5 that Maccon 10 obtained sway over the world, and it is certain that he conquered the west of Europe without doubt, i. e. Alba, France, Saxonland, and the Island of Britain. And it is boasted concerning Daire Sirchreachtach 11 that he obtained sway over all the west of Europe; and some of the learned say that he won the whole world. It is stated that Fathadh Canann 12 obtained the government of the whole world from the rising to the setting sun, and (if it be true) that he took hostages of the streams, the birds, and the languages. And five kings of this tribe took the kingdom of Ireland without doubt, namely, Eochaidh Opthach, 13 Eochaidh Eadghothach, 14 Maccon, 15 and the two Fathadhs,  p.7 namely, Fathadh Airctheach and Fathadh Cairptheach. 16 And of them was Dunghalach Deabhthach, 17 that is, the man of the general war between Leath-Chuinn and Leath-Mhogha; and Lughaidh Mal, 18 the Royal Champion, who won [that part of] the world from Breatain- Leatha 19 to Lochlann 20 and from Innse h-Orc 21 to Spain, and who fought the battle of Carn-Mail in Muirtheimhne 22 against the Race of Ir, son of Milidh, the Race of Eibhear, and the Race of Eireamhon, and this great battle was gained by Lughaidh Mal, and it is said that he [then] took the sovereignty of all Eire [Ireland.] And of them was Eochaidh Ceannmhairc, 23 king of Munster. And not this alone, but they possessed Munster alternately from the time of Daire and Dergtheneadh to the time of Oilill Olum 24 and Maicniadh. And the three kings of them, whom we have mentioned before, assumed the sovereignty of Eire, after Oilill Olum had violated the conditions of the joint sovereignty and covenant against Maicniadh, namely, Maccon and the two Fathadhs. Widely did their tribes extend throughout Ireland. For of them are the Dartraidhe; 25 the Calraidhe Luirg; the Calraidhe of Caladh; the Calraidhe of Inis Nisc; the Calraidhe of Magh-Muirisc in Ui-Amhalghadha; the Corca-Oirche; the Corca  p.9 Laidhe North and South, East and West; and Laighis-h-Ua n-Eneachlais in Cualann; and also the Dal-Mesincorb in Laighin; and of them are the Cascraidhe in the Deise-Mumhan; and of them was Daniel son of Fathadh.

Genealogy of Corca Laidhe here first

Lughaidh Laidhe, from whom the Corca-Laidhe, was the son of Daire Sirchreachtach. Another name for him was Sen Lughaidh. He had a son another Lughaidh, i. e. Maccon, and Lughaidh was also the name of Daire, if some of the poets say truly. Maicniadh 26 was the popular name of Lughaidh Laidhe. Maccon 27 had a celebrated son, namely, Maicniadh. Maicniadh had good sons, namely, Aenghus Gaifuileach, 28 from whom descends Ua Eidersceoil; 29 Duach, from whom Ua Cobhthaigh; 30 and Fiachra from whom Ua Floinn-Arda. 31  p.11 The three Fothadhs were three other sons of his, namely, Fothadh Airctheach 32 and Fothadh Cairptheach and Fathadh Canann. The three Mic Aenchearda of Beara 33 were three other sons of his, and Finnchaemh daughter of Ronan 34 was their mother; and the Ceard artificer, in whose custody they were at first, was of the Ceardraidh of Teamhair: Glas, Gear, and Gubha were their names.

Of the Race of Aenghus, son of Maicniadh, son of Lughaidh, son of Maicniadh

Eiderscel, son of Finn, had two sons, namely, Fathadh and Cathra Cathna. The race of Cathra Cathna, son of Eiderscel, were the Clann-Finn of Garrdha. 35 Macraith, son of Cathna, son of Eiderscel, was he by whom Teampull-mor-Fachtna 36, at Ros-Ailithre was erected. The sons of Finn, son of Nuadhad, were Eiders-cel, from whom Ua Eiderscel, and Intogha, from whom Clann-Intogha; and of them are the Clann-Maghnusa. Son to Fathadh son of Finn was Maccon; son to Maccon was Finn. Finn had two sons, namely, Fathadh and Ciarmhac, from whom the Clann-Ciarmhaic. Fathadh had three sons, namely, Donnchadh Mor, from whom the chieftains, Fathadh Og, from whom the Clann-Fathaidh and Dunlang, from whom the Clann-Dunlaing. Fathadh son of Finn had another son, namely, Aedh Garbh; 37 it is from him are sprung the people of Bearra and  p.13 Ua Eiders-ceoil of Bearra 38 with their correlatives. Donnchadh Mor son of Fathadh, son of Finn, son of Maccon, son of Fathadh, son of Finn, son of Maccon, son of Fathadh, son of Eiders-cel, had three sons, namely, Maccraith, Finn, and Lughaidh; from Finn are sprung the Clann-Bhaltair, and from Lughaidh the Clann-Lughadha. Maccraith had two sons, namely, Donnchadh Got and Aedh Alainn. Aedh Alainn had five sons, namely, Donnchadh, Maccon, Finn, Muircheartach, and Domhnall. Donnchadh had one son, namely, Maccraith the Hospitable, 39 head of the tribe. Maccraith had six sons, namely, Conchobhar, Amhlaeibh, Maccon, Finn, Domhnall Carrach, and Aedh, son of the Danish woman. Finn, son of Aedh, had three sons, namely, Conchobhar, Muircheartach, and Donnchadh: these three became extinct. Domhnall had one son, Diarmaid: Diarmaid had one son, namely, Domhnall Og, who died without issue. Maccon had three sons who had issue, namely, Finghin, Aedh, and Domhnall. Finghin had two sons, namely, Maccon, and Diarmaid. Muircheartach, son of Aedh, had two sons, namely, Fathadh and Diarmaid: these two had goodly issue. Domhnall, son of Maccon, had great sons, namely, Conchobhar and Donnchadh. Aedh had young sons not enumerated, called the Clann-Aedha.

Of the Race of the Gascon 40 DOWN HERE

His name was Amhlaeibh, and he was the fourth son of Donnchadh Mor. From him Clann-an-Ghascunaigh are named. The reason that he was called the Gascon was this: he was given as a pledge for wine to the crew of a merchant's ship from Gascony in his twelfth year, and  p.15 he remained in the East in Gascony, until he was set to take care of vines, when it was proved that he was of noble blood, for the vines grew without defect 41 during his time, and he was conveyed back to his own country; and it is for that reason that his race are called Clann an Ghascunaigh. 42

The Gascon had a son, namely, Donnchadh. Donnchadh had two sons, namely, Diarmaid and Fothadh. Fothadh had one son, namely, another Donnchadh. Donnchadh had two sons, namely, Maccraith and Amhlaimh; and Orlaith, daughter of O'Mathghamhna, 43 was their mother. Diarmaid, son of Donnchadh, son of the Gascon, had five sons, namely, Muircheartach, Diarmaid Eachtach, Maccraith Finn, Amhlaibh Cael, 44 and Donnchadh Balbh. Muircheartach had one three sons, namely, Finghin, Macraith and Conchobhar. Donnchadh had three sons, namely, Finghin, Maccraith, and the Master, 45 i. e. Aedh. The issue of Maccraith were Domhnall, and two daughters, Finnuala 46 and Dirbhail. 47 Domhnall had four sons, namely, Donnchadh, Aedh, Maccraith, and Diarmaid. The Master had two sons, namely, Amhlaibh and Donnchadh. Donnchadh had one son, namely, the Camchosach. 48 Amhlaibh had a son, Amhlaibh Og.

Finghin, son of Donnchadh Got, son of Maccraith, son of Donnchadh Mor, had six sons, namely, Maccon, Maccraith, Donnchadh of Rath, Amhlaibh Ruadh, Aenghus, and Tadhg. Donnchadh of Rath had a son Aedh Ruadh, and Donnchadh Og was another son of his. Maccraith had two sons, namely, Donnchadh and Maccraith Og. Amhlaibh Ruadh had a goodly son, namely, Muircheartach Ruadh. Maccon, son of Finghin, had nine sons, namely, Domhnall Glas, Finghin, Donnchadh, Maccon, Diarmaid, Aedh, Maccraith, Muircheartach, and Daire.

 p.17

 1
Eiderscel, 49
son of Finn,
son of Nuadhat,
son of Donnghal,
son of Murthuile,
son of Dunghus,
son of Aenghus,
son of Folachtach,
son of Flannan,
son of Cobdan,
son of Flannan,
son of Brandubh,
son of Eiderscel,
son of Nathe,
son of Aenghus,
son of Maicniadh,
son of Lughaidh,
son of Maicniadh,
son of Lughaidh Laidhe,
son of Daire Sirchreachtach,
son of Firuillne.
 2
Dubhduin and Folachtach,
two sons of Flannan,
son of Cobdan,
son of Flannan,
son of Brandubh,
son of Eiderscel,
son of Nathe,
son of Aenghus Bolg,
son of Maicniadh,
son of Lughaidh Maccon,
son of Maicniadh,
son of Lughaidh Laidhe, from
whom the Corca-Laidhe are
descended.

Lughaidh Laidhe had two sons, namely, two Aenghuses, i. e. Aenghus Bolg and Aenghus Duibhfhleasc. Flannan had three sons, namely Mochonna, Eilltene, and Colum. Eiltene had two sons, namely, Indlighe and Uisene. Aillene was the grandson of Ithmhaine, son of Colum. Condadh was son of Eochaidh, son of Mairdean, son of Colum, son of Nathe, son of Aenghus Bolg. Eoghan was son of Sleibhine, son of Condadh, son of Eochaidh. Cudamhna was son of Maelaithghin, son of Saithgheal, son of Seanach, son of Nathe. Nathe had three sons, namely, Eiderscel, Colaim, Seanach.

 p.19

Now the Ui Maine

 1
Dimsach,
son of Coibhdeanach,
son of Cuana,
son of Amhalgha,
 2
son of Feidhlimidh,
son of Eanna,
son of Maine Cearr,
son of Aenghus Bolg.

Eanna, son of Maine Cearr had three sons, namely, Feidhlimidh, Duach, Aenghus. Feidhlimidh, son of Eanna, had six sons, namely, Amhalghaidh, Combruit, Minde, Eimhine, Fearghus Feringaurthana, Fiachna.

Of the genealogy of the Ui Duibhleasc, and of the Ui- Aenghusa in general, as stated in the book which the poor people devoured in the wilderness. 50

Aenghus, son of Maicniadh, had four sons, namely, Nathe, Maine, Oilill Beag, Aenghus Duibhfhleasc. These four succeeded to the lands of their father. Aenghus Nemhdhearg, son of Aenghus Duibhleasc, son of Aenghus Bolg, was he from whom are descended the Ui-Duibhleasc; and Maine Cearr, son of Aenghus Bolg, from whom the Ui-Aithne, and the Cineal Maithne (or Maine) &c.

Nathe, son of Aenghus, had two sons, namely, Eiderscel and Coluim. Eiderscel had seven six sons, namely, Fearadhach, Ainmire, Al, Brandubh, Brunnodhran and Fearghus Baeth. Colum, son of Nathe, had three sons, namely, Mairnin, Flaithnin, Aedh. Al, son of Eiderscel, had three sons, namely, Sceallan, Colman, Finan. Brandubh, son of Eiderscel, had seven sons, namely, Flannan, Aedh, Scannlan, Eochaidh Daimhine, Cormac, Fiama, Cathusan. Flannan, son of Brandubh, had three sons, namely, Conall, Uisne, and Cobchan. Mughain, daughter of Flannan, of Cill-Mughaine, 51 was his daughter. Flannan son of Cobchan had two sons, namely, Dubhduin and Folachtach. Folachtach had four sons, namely, Conall, Criche, Dunghalach and Aenghus. Maine, son of Aenghus, had two sons, namely, Eanna and Cathra, and  p.21 one daughter, i. e. Lighain daughter of Maine, 52 who was the mother of Ciaran of Saighir: he was born at Fintracht-Clere, 53 and the angels attended upon her. The orders of heaven baptized him. Here was dwelling the chieftain who first believed in the Cross in Ireland, for Ciaran had taken Saighir thirty years before Patrick arrived, as the poet said—

  1. Saighir the cold 54
    Found a city on its brink;
    At the end of thirty pleasant years
    I shall meet there and thou.

It was then too he Patrick predicted Conall and Fachtna, 55 of whom he said:

  1. A son shall be born at Tulach-teann,
    Good to us shall one day be his church,
    Many monks and steady monasteries
    Conall shall rule after him.

It was he Ciaran that predicted to the progeny of Eiderscel 56 reign and chieftainship over their race for ever; and it was he that left to the  p.23 king of Corca-Laidhe the eniclann of a king of a province for their having first believed in the Cross. And Ciaran is the senior of the saints of Eire; and it was he Ciaran that granted it i. e. the privilege to them for having been the first to grant him Cill-Chiarain. 57

Eanna, son of Maine Cearr, son of Aenghus Bolg, had two other sons, namely, Ailill Comard and Conall Claen. It was this Conall that compiled this Book of Dues 58 for Conall and Fachtna, and that presented it to them at Ard-na-b-Partan in Inis-beag. 59

The Ui-Duibhlisc, the Ui-Builg, and the people of Gleann-Sibhne, 60 and of Bearra, 61 are of the race of Aenghus Bolg, son of Maicniadh son of Lughaidh Maicniadh. Aenghus Ceannfhoda, son of Eanna, son of Maine Cearr, son of Aenghus Bolg, had two sons, namely, Eanna and Muireadhach.

 p.25

Of the genealogy of the Race of Aenghus Bulga down here as proved by the Saltair-Chaisil and the Book of the Island of Inis-Duine. 62

 1
Dunghalach,
son of Maicniadh,
son of Conda Cilline,
son of Fearghus,
son of Ailill,
son of Macreithe,
son of Conall Claen,
son of Gearan,
son of Duach,
son of Maicniadh,
son of Maccon,
 2
son of Lughaidh Laidhe,
son of Daire Sirchreachtach,
son of Sithbholg,
son of Firuillne,
son of Deaghmanrach,
son of Lugh Manrach,
son of Lugh,
son of Eithleann,
son of Lughaidh,
son of Ith,
son of Breogan.

Daire Sirchreachtach had six sons, namely, Lughaidh Laidhe, from whom the Corca Laidhe; Lughaidh Cal, from whom the Calraidhe. This Lughaidh had to wife Lasair, daughter of Laeghaire, son of Niall, son of Lughaidh Meandruadh, from the fairy hills of the son of Scal Balbh 63 who was of the men of Olnegmacht; 64 or, this Scal Balbh was king of Cruithean-tuaith 65 and Manann. 66 This Lughaidh had six sons by Lasair, namely, Aenghus, Cobhthach, Lughaidh, Maccail, Ailill, and Fraechfhear.

Lughaidh Cal went over the sea into Alba, 67 in quest of wealth. 68 In his absence Lughaidh Laidhe, his brother, took to him his wife Lasair. The sons of Lughaidh Cal were not of age to possess lands at this time. Lughaidh Cal heard this thing, and it brought him from the east. 69 The sons of Laeghaire were angered at the seduction of their  p.27 sister, and they proceeded to Rath-gunta in Breagha, 70 to kill Lughaidh Cal, for the crime of his brother, for they were displeased that when Lughaidh Cal went into a strange country he did not convey their sister to them. Lughaidh Cal fled into Connacht with seven heroes to shun his wife's brothers; for it was in Feara-Cul in Breagha 71 the sons of Laeghaire were seated. He never ventured to return to Munster from fear of Lughaidh Laidhe. His posterity branched into seven septs, viz. the Calraidhe of Brigh-Leith, 72 and that is the same as Calraidhe an chaladh; 73 Calraidhe-Innse Nisc 74 who are of the race of Fraechar, son of Lughaidh; Calraidhe of the Three Plains, 75 of the race of Cobhthach; Calraidhe of Breagh-mhaine 76 which sept are of the race of Ailill; Calraidhe Luirg, 77 are a sept descended from Lughaidh, son of Lughaidh: O'Drean is its hereditary chieftain; Calraidhe of Corann; of the race of Aenghus son of Lughaidh are these two Calraidhe, namely, Calraidhe Luirg and Calraidhe of Corann. 78 O'h-Innreachtaigh is the hereditary chief of Calraidhe of Corann; Calraidhe of Cuil-Cearna 79 are also of the race of Aenghus; O'Scingin is their hereditary chief. 80 From Eochaidh, son of Aenghus, son of Lughaidh  p.29 Cal are descended the Calraidhe of Loch Gile 81 and the Dartraidhe. 82 The following are the four chief septs of Dartraidhe and Calraidhe, viz. The Meg-Fhlannchaidh 83 are their kings, the Meg-Crunnluachra 84 their dynasts, the Tealach-Churnain 85 their poets, the Ui-Finn 86 their Brughadha farmers. Aenghus, son of Lughaidh Cal had two sons, namely, Eochaidh and Amhalghaidh. From Amhalghaidh the chiefs are descended, i. e. of the Calraidhe. These are the septs of Calraidhe, viz. Tealach-Crunnluachra, Tealach-Curnain, Tealach-Critain, 87 Tealach-Treabhaire, 88 Tealach-Uaruisce, 89 and Tealach-Cairnean. 90 The septs of Dartraidhe are Tealach-Cascain, 91 Tealach-Conaill, and Tealach-Cagain, [sprung, as stated in the Book of Druim-saileach 92 and the Codex of Druim-sneachta 93 from] the three sons of Ailghil, son of Flann, son of Caithir, son of Dunlang, son of Ailill, son of Cormac, son of Aenghus, son of Eochaidh, son of Aenghus, son of Lughaidh Cal, from whom the Calraidhe, namely, Cadan, Coscan, and Conall. The Calraidhe of Muirisc in Tir-Ua-n-Amhalghadha are of the race of the son of Cael, son of Lughaidh Cal, and this sept is the same as  p.31 Calraidhe of Magh h-Eileag: 94 O'Mailfhina is its hereditary chieftain. 95 They all became extinct except a few, and the Ui-Gaibhtheachain 96 and the Ui Floinn 97 took possession of the land, so that they are the most powerful therein, and these are also of the race of Aenghus, son of Amhalghaidh. Cuil-Cearnadha 98 is called Calraidhe Cuile from its being in the corner or angle of Fith-Gathlaidh; 99 and, if the learned say truly, it is to it the appellation of Calraidhe Innse-Nisc 100 should be given. These are its hereditary tribes, namely, O'Rothlain 101 its chieftain, and Ua Cuinn, 102 Ua Iarnain, 103 and Ua Finain. 104

From Lughaidh Oirche the third son of Daire Sirchreachtach are sprung the Corca-Oirche; 105 from Lughaidh Laighis the Laighis of Ui-Eineachlais; 106 from Lughaidh Corb the Dal-Mescorb 107 of Laighin; from Lughaidh Coscair are the Coscraidhe in the Deise, 108 of whom was Daniel, son of Fothadh, as the historian said:

  1. Six sons had Daire Sirchreachtach,
    A hero of many valorous deeds,
    Lughaidh Cal, who was not slain,
    Whose hand was valiant.
  2.  p.33
  3. Lughaidh Oirche the noble,
    Lughaidh Laighis the valiant,
    Lughaidh Corb, the leader,
    Who was not timid in battle.
  4. Lughaidh Coscair the fair,
    Lughaidh Laidhe the swift,
    Lughaidh Laidhe was
    The noblest of the brothers:
  5. These are the noble sons of Daire,
    It is no biased enumeration,
    With them my displeasure shall not be;
    They are not five but six.

And some say that Daire had five, not six sons.

Coinchinn, daughter of Cathbhadh, had three sons, namely, Mac-Erc, Aenghus, and Conall Claen. Treana had two sons, namely, Aenghus and Mac-Erc. Conall Claen, son of Gearan, son of Duach, had ten sons, namely, five to the west of Dor, 109 and five to the east of Dor. Five of them used to swear for his debts, 110 and five of them used to secure his debts. 111 The five to the west of Dor, were Eochaidh Liath, Eoghan, Macreithe Ceannfoda, Aedh, Aedhlog. The five to the east of Dor were Mactail, Eochaidh Ceannmairc, Eochaidh Ceannmuscraidhe, Eochaidh Ciarraidhe.

 1
Silan, the Bishop, 112
son of Failbhe,
son of Laighinn,
son of Fiachra,
son of Sceallan,
son of Erc,
son of Eoghan,
 2
son of Conall Claen,
son of Gearan.
Brainnsce, or Bran,
son of Donnghal,
son of Conra,
son of Sceallan.
Fiachna,

 p.35

 1
son of Muircheartach,
son of Cuan,
son of Fearghus.
Milchonach,
son of Blathmhac,
son of Loichine,
son of Aedh Caeil Cuisc.
Lughaidh,
son of Ailill,
son of Fearghus.
Cu-allaich,
son of Cuan,
son of Laighinn,
son of Aedh Caimdherc,
son of Carrthach,
 2
Eochaidh,
son of Dunchadh,
son of Ailill,
son of Ronan,
son of Aedh Caimdherc; he
had a crooked eye,
son of Carrthach.
Dunghalach,
son of Tuathal of Bearra,
son of Aedh Finn,
son of Carrthach,
son of Ailill,
son of Eochaidh Liath,
son of Conall Claen,
son of Gearan.

The mother of Conall was Derde of the Ui Cathbhaidh. 113

Carrthach had five sons, namely, Aedh Finn, Aedh Caimdherc, Ailill, Suibhne, Conall.

Cu-comael,
son of Macreithe,
son of Connach Cilline.

Connach Cilline had two sons, namely, Maccon and Macreithe.

 1
Dineartach,
son of Fiachna,
son of Aedh Garbh,
son of Fiachna Fesfoighde,
son of Fiachra Folloirbhe,
son of Eochaidh Cinnmairc,
son of Conall Claen.
 2
Sneadhghal,
son of Cu-duiligh,
son of Crunnmhael,
son of Suibhne,
son of Carrthach,
son of Ailill,
son of Eochaidh [Liath,]
son of Conall Claen.

Gearan had two sons, namely, Conall Claen and Conall Finn.

 p.37

Now comes Aes Cionchinne

Aedh Finn had four sons, namely, Breasal, Tuathal, Tibraide, and Murchadh. Conall had two sons, namely, Flann and Arda.

Now the Ui Badhamhna, 114 viz. —

 1
Donnghus,
son of Cu-choingeilt,
son [of Achtae or] Seanchlanna
son of Scannlan Dubh,
[son of Aedh Clannach,
son of Scannlan Dubh,]
son of Aedh,
son of Silan,
son of Aenghus,
son of Illadon,
son of Maicniath,
son of Macduithe,
son of Eochaidh Badhamhna.
Dubhdisert,
son of Daisene,
son of Goibhnenn,
son of Aedh,
 2
son of Silan,
son of Aenghus.
Folachta,
son of Laighinn,
son of Ronan,
son of Feargna,
son of Fearghus,
son of Colman,
son of Aenghus,
son of Illadon.
Cruithre,
son of Soicheine,
son of Laidhginn,
son of Fearadhach,
son of Aenghus,
son of Illadon.

Five were the sons of Laeghaire, son of Ros, son of Duite.

Ailill had six sons: Cain, from whom Cain Meine; and they say Follach; Ailill; Bearrach, from whom the Ui Chuindlis; Ailill Beag; Ailill Corran, from whom Maenach, from whom the Ui-Mainchine. 115

Ros had five sons, namely, Laeghaire, Mac-Erc, Cearndach, Tighearnach, Eoghan.

Now the Ui Aenghusa

 1
Cairbre,
son of Dineascach,
son of Erce Droma,
son of Finan,
 2
son of Colman,
son of Bruinean,
son of Murbrunn,
son of Cairbre.

 p.39

 1
son of Aenghus,
son of Treana,
son of Duach.
Maine,
son of Failbhe,
son of Eimhine,
son of Crithidh,
son of Seanach,
son of Feargna,
son of Maine,
son of Aenghus,
son of Treana,
son of Duach,
Murghal,
son of Ceithirchlidhna,
 2
son of Furudhran,
son of Eimindre.
Fereiginn,
son of Maelaithghen,
son of Laidhginn,
son of Colman,
son of Bruiden.
Odharchain,
son of Conla,
son of Sleibhine,
son of Feargna Cuile,
son of Aedh,
son of Fintan,
son of Eochaidh,
son of Aenghus.

Aenghus had seven sons, Maine Guach, Cairbre Liathan, Eanna Coilchene, Eocho Coibne, Fearghus Caech, Lughaidh Milchu, Eoghan Barrlac, or Mac-deicill, ut alii [dicunt.]

Now the Ui Mic-Eirc

Treana, son of Duach, had two sons, namely, Mac Eire and Aenghus. Coinchinne, daughter of Cathbhadh, had three sons, namely, Mac-Eirc, Aenghus, and Conall Claen, the third son, who is the progenitor of Cineal Coinchinne seated in the district extending from Feith-na-h-imghona 116 to Droichead-Locha-h-Imchadha. 117

 1
Ere had three sons, namely, Cormac, Blarus, Fearghus. sons of Laipthe,  1
son of Fiachna,
son of Ros,
son of Erc,
son of Treana.
Fiachna,
son of Maenach,
 2
son of Caireall,
son of Fiachra,
son of Ros,
son of Erc,
son of Treana.
Niall,
son of Muireadhach,

 p.41

 1
son of Maenach,
son of Dubhchonna,
son of Flann Fuirtre,
son of Sneadhghal,
son of Cu-airge,
 2
son of Nairchridhe,
son of Dubhdaire,
son of Cuaingle,
son of Lughaidh.

Nairchridhe had three sons, namely, Cu-airge, Aedh Ingar, and Sneadhghal.

 1
Seasnan,
son of Flannchadh,
son of Flaitheamh,
son of Dubhdamhagh,
son of Fuarghus,
son of Sneadhghal,
son of Cu-airge.
Deachmaic,
son of Maeltuile,
 2
son of Flann Fuirtre,
son of Sneadhghal,
son of Cu-fhairrge.
Ailghealan,
son of Aedhagan,
son of Flann Fuirtre,
son of Sneadhghal,
son of Cu-fhairrge.

So far the Clann-Duibhfhleasc.

The Cairbre or Cliach 118 of the plain

 1
Cairbre Mor son of Eochaidh
and Cairbre Beag,
son of Eochaidh,
son of Dluthach,
 2
son of Aenghus,
son of Maicniadh,
son of Lughaidh,
son of Maccon.

And Sigeang, daughter of Fearmora of the Ara Cliach 119 was their mother; and they were born in Femhen-mhagh, 120 and fostered in Cliach-an-mhagh; 121 and Seasnan, son of Eochaidh, son of Cirb, of the men of Cliach was he that nursed them.

 1
Cairbre Crom,
son of Cairbre,
son of Cirb,
son of Eochaidh Ceannmhairc,
 2
son of Conall Claen. And some
say that Sigeang was the mother
of this Cairbre.

 p.43

 1
Cairbre,
son of Faelan,
son of Crimhthan,
son of Eochaidh Ceannreithe,
son of Conall Claen,
 2
Cairbre,
son of Sneadhghus,
son of Failbhe,
son of Nathe,
son of Lughaidh.

Of the Corca-Laidhe

Some assert that the three Fothadhs were sons of Maccon, though they were always set down as of the Race of Fearghus. It was of them Oilill Olum said:—

  1. The three sons whom Lughaidh left,
    Though we love not,
    Fothadh Airgtheach, Fothadh Cairptheach,
    Fothadh Canann.

From Fothadh Airctheach, the Uaithne Thire, 122 and Uaithne Cliach, 123 are descended according to their genealogy. Fothadh Canann had a son Maicniadh. Maicniadh had two sons, namely, Breasal and Aenghus. Breasal had two sons, namely, Conla and Eochaidh. Eochaidh had three sons, namely, Sineall, Fiacha, and Conchobhar.

Genealogy of Ua Conchobhair of Corca-Laidhe Cuile. 124

 1
Conchobhar,
son of Maelan,
son of Eochaidh Guineach,
son of Binneach Beag,
 2
son of Conchobhar,
son of Diarmaid,
son of Beacan,
son of Conchobhar.

Sineall had two sons, namely, Caithrigh and Flannan. Flannan had two sons, namely, Baire and Onchu.

Genealogy of Ua Baire of Ara here

 1
Baire,
son of Eochaidh Aidhnigh,
 2
son of Eichin,
son of Aedhan Beag,

 p.45

 1
son of Gabhran.
son of Baire,
son of Conchobhar,
son of Eochaidh,
son of Breasal,
son of Maicniadh,
son of Fothadh Canann,
son of Maccon.
Codfach,
son of Dubhdalethe,
son of Dubhleanna,
son of Maelcorma,
son of Cuileannan,
son of Bruadar,
 2
son of Dunlaing,
son of Dunadhach,
son of Flaithimh,
son of Flaithbheartach,
son of Flann Arda,
son of Maccon,
son of Condach,
son of Fearghus,
son of Conall,
son of Treana,
son of Duach,
son of Maicniadh,
son of Maccon.

Maicniadh had four sons, namely, Duach, Eochaidh, Aenghus, and Ceallach, from whom the Corca-Laidhe. From Eochaidh is sprung Ua Badamhna; from Duach Ui Conaill, Ui Aenghusa, and Ui Mac Eire; from Aenghus are the Ui-Builc, i. e.

 1
Maccraith,
son of Cathna,
son of Eiderscel,
[son of Fain,
son of Nuada,]
son of Donnghal,
son of Murthuile,
son of Dunghus,
son of Aenghus,
 2
son of Folachtach,
son of Flannan,
son of Cobdan,
son of Flannan,
son of Brandamh,
son of Eiderscel,
son of Nathe,
son of Aenghus,
son of Maicniadh

The three sons of Aenghus were Nathe, Maine, and Duibhleisc, from whom the Ui-Maine, the Ui Builc, and the Ui-Duibhleisc, with their correlatives. Treana had three sons, namely, Conall, Aenghus, and Mac-Eirc. So far from the Book of Lothra-Ruadhain. 125

From Eochaidh Liathain are sprung Ua n-Aigheanain, Ua Tighearnaigh, Ua Ainnle, and Ua Dubhagain.

 p.47

From Eochaidh Ceannreithe are sprung Ua Conaill of Cathair Durlais, 126 and Ua Conneid.

From Eochaidh Ceannmhairc are the Muintir Doirc.

Eochaidh Ruibhdhearc, Eoghan Sceall.

Aenghus, son of Treana, had eight sons, namely, Maine, Cairbre, Fearghus, Eanna, Lughaidh, Eochaidh, Feithmheach, and Fiacha.

Duach, son of Eirc, had four sons, namely, Fintan, Lonan, Ros, Follach.

 1
Fachtna, 127
son of Maenach,
son of Conall,
son of Ros,
 2
son of Mac Eirc,
son of Treana,
son of Maicniadh.

Eochaidh, son of Fiacha Badamhna, had four sons, namely, Duach, Scannlan, Ros, Aenghus.

 1
Conall,
son of Flann,
son of Cobdan,
son of Brandubh,
son of Eiderscel.
Bearchan, 128 c 129
son of Fiachra,
son of Eochaidh Connmhairc,
son of Conall Claen.
 2
Ceallach,
son of Connmhach,
son of Flann,
son of Dorc,
son of Dunlaing,
son of Aedh,
son of Cairbre,
son of Eochaidh Cinnmhairc.

Seven and twenty bishops of the Race of Lughaidh took possession of the See of Ros from Fachtna, son of Maenach, to Dunghalach, son of Folachtach, as the poet says: —

  1. Seven and twenty bishops nobly
    Occupied Ros of the truly fertile lands
    From the time of Fachtna the melodious, the renowned,
    To the well-ordered reign of Dungalach.
  2.  p.49
  3. [Conall, son of Flann of fame,
    Son of Cobdan, who loved battle,
    Good his valor, I shall not conceal it,
    Son of Brandamh, son of Eiderscel.
  4. Bearchan, son of Fiachra, who was mighty,
    Son of Eochaidh Cinnmhairc famed in story,
    Ceallach, son of Conmhac, son of Flann,
    Son of Dorc, son of Dunlaing,
    Who was son of Aedh, true it is,
    Son of the chief king of Corca-Laidhe.]

*The Hereditary Proprietors of Corca-Laidhe.*

[The boundaries 130 of Corca-Laidhe here: from Beann-Finn 131 to Traigh Omna, 132 westwards to Feith-na-h-imghona; 133 from Beal-atha-buidhe 134 to Traigh-Claen, 135 at the Rock.

  1. Seven and twenty bishops 136 nobly
    Occupied Ros of the truly fertile lands
    From the time of Fachtna the melodious, the renowned,
    To the well-ordered reign of Dunghalach.]

The country of O'Gillamichil 137 extends from Feith-na-h-Imghona to Ceann-mara 138 and from Beann-Sidhain 139 to Beal-atha-seamann. 140 These are his hereditary leaders, 141 namely, O'Duibharda, 142 O'Dunlaing, 143  p.51 O'h-Ogain, 144 O'Dubhagain, 145 Ua Meiceidich, 146 Ua Chiabhain, 147 Ua Cheartaigh, 148 Ua Buadhaigh, 149 Ua Mongain, 150 Ua Doirc, 151 Ua Meccon, 152 Ua Aingle, 153 Ua Mothla, 154 Ua Maileadair, 155 Ua Adhaimh, 156 Ua Bairr, 157 and Ua Rosna. 158 Of this territory 159 was the man, who for his means was the most hospitable and bountiful that ever came, to our knowledge, of this tribe, namely, the representative of Bearchan, 160 i. e. the Great Vicar O'Gillamichil, who was usually called Open Purse.—Extracted from O'Dubhagain's Book.

Tuath Ui Chonneid, i. e. the Garrgha 161 extends from Ceann-mara 162 to Loch-an-Bhricin, 163 and from Midhros 164 to Beal-an-atha-solais. 165 n 166 O'Conneid 167 is its chief. These are his hereditary leaders, viz. O'Muimhnich, 168 O'Drochruainnigh, 169 O'Fuailchin, 170 Ua Chaingne, 171 and Ua Dubhchonna. 172

Tuaith Ruis, i. e. Tuath Indolaich extends from Loch-an-Bhricin  p.53 to Fiadh Ruis, 173 and from Traigh-long 174 to Sidh-na-bhfear-bhfinn. 175 O'Laeghaire 176 is its hereditary chieftain. These are its hereditary leaders, viz. O'Ruaidhre, 177 O'Lonain, 178 O'Laididh, 179 O'Torpa, 180 O'h-Urmoltaich, 181 O'Mirin, 182 O'Macdairic, 183 O'Tuaraidhe, 184 O'Treana, 185 O'h-Uainidhe, 186 and O'Cerdin. 187

Tuath O'n-Aenghusa extends from Fearsad-Ruis 188 to Goilin-na- gaethneamhdha, 189 and from Dun-Deide 190 to Beal-atha-na-leice. 191 O'h-Aenghusa 192 is its hereditary chief. These are his hereditary leaders, viz. Ua Corrbuidhe, 193 Ua Dubhain, 194 Ua Duinnin, 195 O'Mudain, 196 O'h-Aidhne, 197 O'Mainchin, 198 O'Cuis, 199 O'Cuile, 200 O'Dearcain, 201 O'h-Iairisnich, 202 Ua Odhradain, 203 O'Grese, 204 O'Cuilin, 205 and O'Sinnaich. 206

Tuath O'Fithcheallaigh extends from Goilin-na-gaithneamha to the Island of Inis-Duine, 207 and from Dun-Eoghain 208 to Glaise-draigheach. 209 O'Fithcheallaigh 210 is its hereditary chief. These are its hereditary  p.55 leaders: O'Cormaic, 211 O'Donnamhain, 212 O'Dubhchon, 213 O'h-Iarnain, 214 O'Nuallain, 215 O'Croinin, 216 O'Sife, 217 and O'h-Ainbhith. 218

Tuath O'n-Dunghalaigh extends from the Island of Inis-Duine to Beal-atha-na-h-Uidhre, 219 and from Greallach-na-gruime 220 to Achadha. 221 O'Dunghaile 222 is its hereditary chief. These are its hereditary leaders, viz. Ua Mailchomadh, 223 Ua h-Aedha 224 of Cluain-da-mhael, 225 O'Loingsich, 226 O'Mailtemhin, 227 O'Ceallaich, 228 O'Mailguirm, 229 O'Muireadhaich, 230 O'Sealbhaich, 231 and O'Gabhadhain. 232

The Mearings of the Middle Cantred; viz. O'Cobhthaigh's territory

Tuath-Ui-Duibhdaleithe extends from Beal-atha-na h-Uidhre to Beal-atha-buidhe, 233 and from Gort-na-daibhche 234 to Loch-an-tairbh. 235  p.57 O'Dubhdaleithe 236 is its chief. These are its hereditary leaders: Ua Mailcheallaich, 237 Ua Duibhleanna, 238 Ua Mailchorma, 239 O'Cuileannain, 240 O'Bruadair, 241 Ua Dunadhaich, 242 and O'Lathimh. 243

Genealogy of Ua Eidersceoil. 244

 1
Maccon, 245
son of Finghin,
son of Donnchadh Gud,
son of Maccraith,
son of Donnchadh Mor,
son of Fothadh,
son of Finn,
son of Maccon,
son of Fothadh,
son of Eiderscel,
son of Finn,
son of Nuadhat,
son of Donnghal,
son of Murthuile,
son of Dunghus,
son of Aenghus,
son of Folachtach,
son of Flannan,
son of Cobdan,
son of Flannan,
son of Bran Dubh,
son of Eiderscel,
son of Nathe,
son of Aenghus,
 2
son of Maicniadh,
son of Maccon, 246
son of Lughaidh,
son of Daire Sirchreachtach,
son of Firfhuilne,
son of Sithbholg,
son of Deadhmannra,
son of Deagha Dearg,
son of Dergthenedh,
son of Nuadhat,
son of Lachtaine,
son of Lugh,
son of Ethleann
son of Eireamhon,
son of Eadamain,
son of Gos,
son of Sin,
son of Maithsin,
son of Lugh,
son of Eadamhoin
son of Mal,
son of Lughaidh,
son of Ith,
son of Breogan.

 p.59

Genealogy of Ua Cobhthaigh. 247

 1
[Tadhg,
son of Cobhthach,
son of Walter,
son of Nichol,
son of Conchobhar,
son of Maghnus,
son of Aedh,
son of Donnchadh of Daingean,
son of Fearghal of Dun,
son of Diarrnaid of Achadh Conmhaic,
son of Conchobhar,
son of Mathghamhain,
son of Conchobhar Cearmna,
son of Macraith,
son of Domhnall,
 2
son of Donnchadh Mor,
son of Cobhthach Finn,
son of Dunghalach,
son of Ailill,
son of Maccon,
son of Connad of Cillen,
son of Fearghus,
son of Ailill,
son of Macreithe,
son of Conall Claen,
son of Gearan,
son of Duach,
son of Maicniadh,
son of Maccon,
son of Lughaidh,
son of Ith.]

Thus it is found in the Saltair Chaisil

The three Fothadhs, namely, Fothadh Airctheach, Fothadh Cairptheach, i. e. Fothadh Canann, and Fothadh Dolus, were the three sons of Fuinnche, daughter of Nar, son of Fearmora of the Ara-Cliach. Teite, daughter of Maicniadh, son of Lughaidh, son of Daire Dearg, son of Gnathal, son of Nuadhat Neacht, son of Seatna Sithbhaic was her sister. Fuinnche brought forth together three male children, and they were the three sons of Feidhlimidh, son of Maicniadh, son of Gnathal, son of Maermaith, son of Cairbre Nia Nair, or Nia-fhear, whereon a certain poet sung:

  1. The three Fothadhs, three sons were they
    Of Feidhlimidh the Great, son of Maicniadh, p.61
    Son of Gnathal, who was son of Maermaith,
    Son of Cairbre Niadh, the highly good.

Other books state that they were of the race of the Ui-Eachach of Uladh, 248 i. e. Irial Glunmhar, son of Conall Cearnach, had two sons, namely, Forc and Iboth. Recht-ghidh Righ-dhearg led them into Alba. They gained great battles, so that great districts were laid waste in Alba, until the men of Alba submitted to Reacht-ghidh Righ-dhearg, so that he was king of Eire and Alba, and it was from them sprang the two tribes Tuath Forc and Tuath Iboth 249 in Alba. Three times fifty men came over from thence in exile, and they took Cluithrin Cliach, 250 and the land on which they are seated at this day. And they took Crich-Maine, and Crich-Fiachrach, and Crich-Baiscinn as the heirs of their grandfather, namely, of Eochaidh, son of Luchta, viz. the heirs of Uaithne and Eile, the two daughters of Eochaidh, son of Luchta. The country of Eile extended from the Sinainn 251 east and south, and the country of Uaithne from the Sinainn north-west to Derg-dhearc, 252 and the tribes are called from the names of these women; for the one, i. e. Eile, went as wife to Caela Righ-dhearc, king of Eile and Bladhma, 253 and from her Eile is named. The other, i. e. Uaithne went as wife to Fearrghus Foltleabhar, and from her Uaithne is named. She had four sons called Nias, viz. Uarth-Nia, Druth-Nia, Cainn-Nia, and Deoch-Nia. Oeth-Nia, Cainn-Nia, and Deoch-Nia were three full brothers, and these are they who are there.

Maicniadh, the father of the Fothadhs, was the son of Cairbre, son of Cormac, son of Mesinsuadh, son of Mesinfuirc, son of Mesinforgaill, son of Meanboth. Others say that they were the three sons by Feidhlimidh of the fair hair of Feidhlimidh, son of Niadh, son of Gnathal, son of Earcmar, son of Cairbre, son of Cairbre Nia-fhear. From him is Leithghleann-Erc, and of him it was permitted that there was no greater royal heir. Erc, son of Feidlimidh, was drowned in a lake, i. e. Loch Feidhlime. 254

 p.63

Nuadhat Neacht had three sons, namely, Gnathaltach, grandfather of the Fothadhs, and Baiscne, grandfather of Finn Ua Baiscne, 255 and Fearghus Fairrge, ancestor of the kings of Leinster, as the poet says:

  1. The three Fothadhs truly,
    Maicniadh, Lughdhach the furious,
    Daire Dearg the fiery fierce
    Gnathaltach of the hattle shout,
    Nuada Neacht who took
    The Geilfhine of the Gaileoin,
    The fierce Finnfhir of Umhall,
    Active, mighty, the noble three
    Sanbh, Soalt, Sofhear the vigorous,
    Baiscne, Bodanar,
    Nuada Neacht, furious Lughaidh,
    Finn the poet, Rosa Ruadh Ruipe,
    Fearghus Fiadha, Fairrge Falnath Nia,
    Nuadha Neacht, a sparkling gem.

Ailiter, the sons of Cealtchar, son of Uitheochair, were Eoghan, Ailill, Seam, Feartlachtgha, Druthnia, and Uaithnia. The descendants of Uaithnia, son of Cealtchar, are the Uaithne-thire, and the Uaithne-Cliach quod predictum est:

 1
Madadhan,
son of Ruaidhre,
son of Caithnia,
son of Cathalan,
son of Cathan,
son of Dearmaid,
son of Aenghus,
son of Gormghal,
son of Flaitheamh,
son of Fogartach,
son of Donnghalach,
son of Fothadh,
 2
son of Toman,
son of Finan,
son of Fiachra,
son of Fintan,
son of Nadfraech,
son of Maclaisre,
son of Maccaille,
son of Fearrghus,
son of Dallan,
son of Fochta,
son of Fothadh Airctheach,

 p.65

 1
son of Maicniadh. (For they
the three Fothadhs were
the three sons of Maicniadh. Or Maicniadh,
 2
son of Lughaidh,
son of Daire Dearg,
son of Gnathaltach,
son of Nuada Neacht.

Genealogy of the Uaithne Thire

 1
Loingseach,
son of Seasnan,
son of Congealtach,
son of Donnchadh,
 2
son of Eochaidh,
son of Naindeanach,
son of Brocan,
son of Bearach.

Naindeanach, son of Brocan, son of Bearach, had four sons, namely, Eochaidh, Forbusach, Fogartach and Muirghius. Dearmaid had eight sons, namely, Gradhmacan, Aibeannan, Laeghdha, Dubhleanna, Finnacan, Cathan, Laeghaire, and Finnmacan. Aenghus had three sons, namely, Dearmaid, Clumhan, and Macluchta. Gormghal had two sons, namely, Aenghus and Cormac. Gormghal and Caithear were the two sons of Flaitheamh, son of Fogartach. Fogartach, Forbasach, and Airrthile were the three sons of Donnghalach, son of Fothadh. Fothadh had two sons, namely, Donnghalach and Cathasach. Ailill and Fearghal were the two sons of Eochaidh, son of Aeilead, son of Toman. Maelcolcaigh, Toman, Ailill and Ceannfaeladh were the four sons of Finan, son of Finnghalach. Bearach and Fintan were two sons of Fiachra, son of Fintan. Beac was son of Fintan. Cachnae and Maccaille were two sons of Fearghus, son of Dallan, son of Fachtna, son of Fothadh Airctheach. Cathan had six sons, namely, Cathalan, Cearmaid, Catharnach, Maclachtna, Aille and Diarmaid.

Document details

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Title statement

Title (uniform): The genealogy of Corca Laidhe

Title (supplementary): English translation

Title (original, Irish): Geinealach Chorca Laidhe

Author: unknown

Editor: John O'Donovan

Responsibility statement

translated by: John O'Donovan

Electronic edition compiled by: Beatrix Färber and Janet Crawford

Proof corrections by: Beatrix Färber, Janet Crawford and Sara Sponholz

Funded by: University College Cork.

Edition statement

7. Seventh draft.

Extent: 69000 words

Publication statement

Publisher: CELT: Corpus of Electronic Texts: a project of University College, Cork

Address: College Road, Cork, Ireland — http://www.ucc.ie/celt

Date: 2011

Distributor: CELT online at University College, Cork, Ireland.

CELT document ID: T105009

Availability: Available with prior consent of the CELT programme for purposes of academic research and teaching only.

Source description

Manuscript Sources of the Irish main text

  1. Dublin, Royal Irish Academy MS 535, olim 23 P 2 olim Book of Lecan, ff. 90–92. For further details see Kathleen Mulchrone, T. F. O'Rahilly et al. (eds.), Catalogue of Irish Manuscripts in the Royal Irish Academy (Dublin 1926–70) fasc. 13, 1551–1610. This vellum MS was complied for Giolla Iosa Mór Mhic Fhir Bhisigh before his death in A.D. 1418. Digital images of the Book of Lecan can be viewed on the website of the ISOS Project of the Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies (http://www.isos.dias.ie/english/index.html). Edited by Kathleen Mulchrone, The Book of Lecan, Leabhar Mór Mhic Fhir Bhisigh Leacain: Facsimiles in Collotype of Irish Manuscripts II, being a collection of pieces (prose and verse) in the Irish language, in part compiled in the early fourteenth century with a descriptive introduction and indexes (Dublin 1937).
  2. Royal Irish Academy Dublin, MS 536 (olim 23 P 12), the Book of Ballymote, vellum; (AD 1383x–1397). 251 folios; scribes Solamh Ó Droma, Robertus Mac Síthigh, and Maghnus Ó Duibhgeannáin (ob. 1452); patron Tomaltach Mac Donnchaidh (ob. 1397), lord of Tír Oilealla, in whose family it remained until 1522, when it was sold to Aodh Óg Ó Domhnaill, lord of Tír Chonaill. Owned by archbishop James Ussher in the seventeeth century. Later in the Library of Trinity College Dublin from which it was borrowed in 1719, never to be returned. Presented to the Royal Irish Academy in 1785. Digital images of the manuscript can be viewed on the website of the ISOS Project of the Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies (http://www.isos.dias.ie/english/index.html).

Manuscript Sources of appendix material

  1. Appendix F: pp 93–95: MS Clogher, TCL, as edited by Charles Smith 1746, pp. 125–27; 129; 140–41.
  2. Appendix F: p 96–98: Carew MSS. No. 632 p. 254, 254b, 255b, per C. Nash.
  3. The poem 'Aeidhe ma chroidhe, ceann Bhriain' (='Aoidhe mo chroidhe ceann Bhriain') on p. 147–173 by Giolla Brighde Mac Conmidhe is extant in five manuscripts. The earliest dated one is NLI G992 (Nugent MS) c. 1577. It is also contained in the Book of O'Conor Don 1631, in RIA RIA 5 (23 D 4), a 17th-century manuscript of Munster origin, and in two later manuscripts in the RIA. See the Bardic Poetry Database hosted on the DIAS website (http://bardic.celt.dias.ie/).
  4. The poem 'Marthain le mac Conchobhair' by Eoin Masach Ua Maethagain (Ó Maothagáin or O'Mehegan), p. 328–339 is extant in Trinity College Library, MS 1363, olim H. 4. 22, a 16th-century manuscript. See the Bardic Poetry Database hosted on the DIAS website (http://bardic.celt.dias.ie/).
  5. The poem 'Tarraidh tuiseal tir Luigheach' by Tadhg mac Diarmada Óig Uí Dhálaigh to his patron Sir Finghin mac Conchubhair O hEidirsceoil on p. 340–351 of the appendix is extant in RIA 5 (23 D 4), a 17th-century manuscript and, in a transcript of this, made by Eugene O'Curry, RIA 888. See the Bardic Poetry Database hosted on the DIAS website (http://bardic.celt.dias.ie/).
  6. The poem 'Leo féin chuirid Clann Ítha' (='Leo fein cuirid Clann Iotha') by Fearfeasa O'n Chainte (352–369) is extant in in RIA 5 (23 D 4), a 17th-century manuscript, and in a transcript of this, made by Eugene O'Curry, RIA 888. See the Bardic Poetry Database hosted on the DIAS website (http://bardic.celt.dias.ie/).

Internet Resources

  1. A PDF version of O'Donovan's Miscellany is available at http://www.archive.org.
  2. The LOCUS Project, UCC (http://www.ucc.ie/locus/).
  3. Hogan's Onomasticum online (http://publish.ucc.ie/doi/locus).
  4. http://www.logainm.ie (the website of the Irish Placenames Commission).
  5. Dr Katherine Simms's Bardic Poetry Database hosted on the DIAS website (http://bardic.celt.dias.ie/).

Literature

  1. Philip O'Sullivan Beare, Historiae Catholicae Iberniae compendium: domino Philippo Austriaco III, Hispaniarum, Indiarum, aliorum regnorum atque multarum ditionum regi Catholico monarchaeque potentissimo dicatum a D. Philippo O'Sullevano Bearro, Iberno (Lisbon 1621). (O'Donovan refers to this as 'History of the Irish Catholics'.)
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  14. Thomas Leland, The history of Ireland from the invasion of Henry II: with a preliminary discourse on the antient state of that kingdom. 3 volumes (Dublin 1773–74.)
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  17. James Hardiman, Irish Minstrelsy, or, Bardic remains of Ireland, with English poetical translations (London 1831) vol. 2, 361.
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  19. P. Louis Lainé, Généalogie de la Maison de McCarthy: Anciennement Souveraine des deux Momonies ou de l'Irlande méridionale (...) publié dans le cinquième volume des Archives généalogiques et historiques de la Noblesse de France (Paris 1839).
  20. John O'Donovan, The circuit of Ireland, by Muircheartach mac Neill, prince of Aileach; a poem written in the year DCCCCXLII by Cormacan Eigeas, chief poet of the north of Ireland, Tracts relating to Ireland, vol. i (Dublin: Irish Archaeological Society 1841) 24–58; with an introduction, copious footnotes, additional notes (being three pages of genealogical tables), an index, and (as frontispiece) a map of Ireland to illustrate the circuit of Muirchertach mac Néill. (The Irish text is online at CELT.)
  21. John O'Donovan, The banquet of Dun na nGedh, and the Battle of Magh Rath, an ancient historical tale. Now first published, from a manuscript in the Library of Trinity College, Dublin [Yellow Book of Lecan], with a translation and notes. (Dublin: Irish Archaeological Society) 1842.
  22. John O'Donovan (ed.), The Tribes and Customs of Hy-Many, commonly called O'Kelly's Country (Dublin 1843; reprinted by Tower Books, Cork 1976; reprinted by Irish Genealogical Foundation, Kansas City, Missouri, c. 1992). (Online edition available on CELT).
  23. John O'Donovan (ed.), The Genealogies, Tribes and Customs of Hy-Fiachrach (Dublin 1844). (Online edition available on CELT).
  24. John Lynch, Cambrensis Eversus, seu potius Historica fides in rebus hibernicis Girald Cambrensi abrogata: in quo plerasque justi historici dotes desiderari, plerosque naevos inesse (...) Ed., with translation and notes, by the Rev. Matthew Kelly, 3 vols. (Dublin: The Celtic Society, 1848–1852).
  25. John O'Donovan (trans.), James Henthorn Todd and William Reeves (eds), The Martyrology of Donegal: A Calendar of the Saints of Ireland. Dublin, (printed for the Irish Archaeological and Celtic Society 1864. [= O'Clery's Irish Calendar].
  26. Eoin MacNeill (ed.), 'The Dési genealogies (from the Book of Ballymote)', Journal of the Waterford & South East Ireland Archaeological Society 13 (1910) 44–51, 82–87, 152–57.
  27. Kuno Meyer (ed.), 'Conall Corc and the Corco Luigde', in: Osborn J. Bergin, R. I. Best, Kuno Meyer, J. G. O'Keeffe (eds.), Anecdota from Irish manuscripts iii (Halle/Saale 1910) 57–63 [from Laud Misc. 610]. (Online edition available on CELT).
  28. Eoin Mac Neill (=John Mac Neill), Early Irish population-groups: their nomenclature, classification, and chronology, Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy (C), 29, (1911–12) 59–114. (Online edition available on CELT).
  29. Kuno Meyer (ed.), 'The Laud genealogies and tribal histories', Zeitschrift für Celtische Philologie 8 (1912) 292–338, 418–19 (corrigenda) [from Laud Misc. 610].
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  31. T. F. O'Rahilly, Early Irish History and Mythology (Dublin 1946).
  32. Donnchadh Ó Corráin, 'The regnal succession in Ciarraighe Luachra', Journal of the Kerry Archaeological and Historical Society 1 (1968) 46–55.
  33. John V. Kelleher, 'The pre-Norman Irish genealogies', Irish Historical Studies 16 (1968) 138–153.
  34. Donnchadh Ó Corráin, 'A further note on the Alltraighe', Journal of the Kerry Archaeological and Historical Society 3 (1970) 19–22.
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  36. Francis John Byrne, Tribes and tribalism in early Ireland, Ériu 22 (1971) 128–166.
  37. John V. Kelleher, 'Uí Maine in the annals and genealogies to 1225', Celtica 9 (1971) 61–112.
  38. Donnchadh Ó Corráin, 'Dál Calathbuig', Éigse 14 (1971), 13–16.
  39. Gearóid Mac Niocaill, Ireland before the Vikings (Dublin 1972).
  40. Kenneth W. Nicholls, Gaelic and gaelicised Ireland in the Middle Ages (Dublin 1972, new edition 2003).
  41. Francis John Byrne, Irish kings and high-kings (New York 1973, second edition Dublin 2001).
  42. Francis John Byrne, 'Senchas: the nature of Gaelic historical tradition', in John Barry (ed.), Historical Studies 9 (Belfast 1974), 137–159.
  43. David N. Dumville, 'Kingship, genealogies, and regnal lists', in: P. H. Sawyer & I. N. Wood (eds.), Early medieval kingship (Leeds 1977) 72–104.
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  46. Nicholas Williams (ed.), The Poems of Giolla Brighde Mac Conmidhe (London: ITS 1980).
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  57. Michael Herity (ed.), Ordnance Survey letters: letters containing information relative to antiquities collected during the progress of the Ordnance Survey [by John O'Donovan, Eugene Curry, Thomas O'Connor, Patrick O'Keeffe and others], with an Introduction and prefatory matter (Dublin 2001-).
  58. Donnchadh Ó Corráin, 'Prehistoric and Early Christian Ireland', in Roy Foster (ed.), The Oxford Illustrated History of Ireland (Oxford 2001) 1–52.
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The edition used in the digital edition

‘The genealogy of Corca Laidhe’ (1849). In: Miscellany of the Celtic Society‍. Ed. by John O’Donovan. Vol. 1. odd pages 3–79; pages 82–85, 86–144, 147–183, 327–351; odd pages 353–369; 384–400. Dublin: The Celtic Society.

You can add this reference to your bibliographic database by copying or downloading the following:

@incollection{T105009,
  editor 	 = {John O'Donovan},
  title 	 = {The genealogy of Corca Laidhe},
  booktitle 	 = {Miscellany of the Celtic Society},
  address 	 = {Dublin},
  publisher 	 = {The Celtic Society},
  date 	 = {1849},
  volume 	 = {1},
  note 	 = {odd pages 3–79; pages 82–85, 86–144, 147–183, 327–351; odd pages 353–369; 384–400}
}

 T105009.bib

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The electronic edition represents odd pages 3–79, as well as Appendix C (82–85), D (86), E (87–92), F (93–140), 'Remarks on the Preceding Tract', pp 141–144, 147–183, Appendix I (327–351; 353–369 and 384–400). Henry Docwra's 'Relation of Service done in Irlande' on 187–229 and his 'Narration of the Services done by the Army ymployed to Lough-Foyle' on 233–286 are available on CELT in separate files. The editor's footnotes (designated with alphabetic letters by the editor) are numbered and tagged note type="auth" n="".

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Creation: c. 1383–1418 [Irish text]

Date: 1849 [translation]

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  • The text is in English. (en)
  • Some words throughout the text and the documents on pp 108–136 in the appendix are in Latin. (la)
  • Some words are in Irish. (ga)
  • Some words in the appendix are in French. (fr)
  • A word is in Greek. (gr)

Keywords: genealogy; prose; poetry; medieval; Corco Laighdhe; O'Driscolls; translation

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 p.67

Appendix A

LUGHAIDH MAL.

He was one of the sons of Daire Sirchreachtach, as appears from the following story given concerning him and his brothers in the Dinnseanchus in the Book of Leacan, fol. 256, a.b. voce CARN MAIL. “Carnn Mail in Magh Uladh whence was it named? It is not difficult to tell. It was otherwise called Carnn Luighdheach, from Lughaidh Mal, who was driven from Eire with a fleet of seven ships, and from Alba he set out for Eire with the great fleet of Alba; and they gave battle to the Ulstermen and defeated them. Every man that came into battle with Lughaidh carried a stone, and thus the carn was formed, and it was on it Lughaidh was standing 256 while the battle was fought. Whence Carn Lughaidh is called.”

  1. Delightful what falls to my care,
    It is not the knowledge of one place only,
    My mind extends its clear view to the east
    Over the depths and heights of the world.
  2. But since they are enquiring it of you,
    If they like difficult knowledge [I will tell]
    Whence is the name still here before us,
    Of Carnn Mail in Magh Uladh.
  3. Lughaidh Mal, who destroyed much,
    Was banished out of Eire,
    With a fleet of seven ships the king's son sailed
    From Eire to the land of Alba.
  4. He fought for the eastern country
    In battles, in conflicts,
    From Eadain 257 to the wide-spreading Lochlann, 258
    From the Islands of Orc 259 to Spain.
  5.  p.69
  6. When he obtained the powerful kingdom,
    He brought with him a numerous army,
    So that the harbours of Uladh were filled
    With the barques of the fierce champions.
  7. Battle or tribute was demanded
    By Lughaidh of the men of Fail, 260
    To draw them into battle
    Was the object of the future monarch.
  8. After this he came up quickly
    To engage in battle very fiercely,
    Each man brought a stone into the battle,
    And thus Carn Lughaidh was made.
  9. And where Lughaidh Mal [stood] was
    On the even white-surfaced carn
    Until the great battle was gained,
    Over the beauteous men of Eire.
  10. Lughaidh obtained by means of his lance
    The sovereignty both of the foreigners and Gaeidhil,
    The man by whom the carn was formed,
    Which lies in the fair plain of Uladh … Delightful.
  11. The comely Daire had seven sons;
    Lughaidh was the name of each:
    In hopes the prophecy in them would be fulfilled,
    One name was given to them all.
  12. Daire had a magical fawn as a familiar
    In the shape of a yearling deer,
    His four sons met it
    By old Teamhair on the north-east. 261
  13.  p.71
  14. The fawn passed on swiftly,
    Until he reached the stream of Sinainn,
    And the fawn there was slain
    By the four noble and very comely youths.
  15. They cast lots, without sadness,
    The sons of Daire of Dun-na-n-eigeas, 262
    That each of them might know his share,
    Of the magical fawn without danger.
  16. To Lughaidh Corb it fell
    To slaughter the fawn, though menial the deed,
    And from him is named the sept
    Of Dal Meascorb in Crich-Cualann.
  17. Whilst each of them was at his share,
    Lughaidh Cal was in his sleep,
    So that his tribe, without condition,
    Is Calraidhe in the regions of Connacht.
  18. Lughaidh gave a drink of water,
    Though clear, it was not the water of knowledge, 263
    So that his race after this
    Are the Corca Oirche in the vicinity of Caiseal.
  19. Lughaidh Mor the father of Maccon
    Obtained alone all Eire,
    So that from Lughaidh Laidhe henceforward
    The sept of Corca-Laidhe are named.
  20. As they were in the house,
    The men within at the fire,
    A hag approached, ugly and bald,
    Uncouth and loathsome to behold.
  21.  p.73
  22. High she was as any mast,
    Larger than a sleeping booth her ear,
    Blacker her face than any visage,
    Heavy on each heart was the hag.
  23. Larger her front-tooth, who could but see it—
    Than a square of a chess-board,
    Her nose projected far in front,
    Longer than the plough's cold share.
  24. Larger than a basketful of ears of wheat,
    Each fist;—in a woman it was unbecoming,—
    Larger than a rock in a wall
    Each of her rough black knees.
  25. She was one continuous belly,
    Without ribs, without separation,
    A rugged, hilly, thick, black head
    [Was] upon her like a furzy mountain.
  26. She went to them into the strong house
    In which the sons of the king of Eire were,
    Pitiful the deed, ugly the exhibition,
    She made to them to excite them.
  27. She maddened their sense and reason,
    It was leaping into the middle of a conflict,
    The sons of Daire were abandoned
    To an ignominious death.
  28. She spoke to them an evil speech,
    'One of you shall lie with me to-night,
    Or you, both hound and man so straight,
    To monster shapes I will transform.'
  29. When he saw the wonderful deed,
    Lughaidh Laidhe said to them, p.75
    I will go with her, though loathsome the condition,
    [It is] enough for you that I only am lost.
  30. As the fire darkened,
    She passed into another wonderful form,
    She assumed a form of wondrous beauty;
    Ruddy were her cheeks, and round her breasts.
  31. Her eyes were thus,
    They were not such as to cloud her face,
    Three sunbeams in each of them shone,
    Whatever she looked on grew bright.
  32. The purple beautiful covering was removed
    From her breasts down, by the old woman,
    So that a flesh-worm could be taken out
    In the house by the light of her fair skin.
  33. After this the youth asked her,
    'O fair damsel, whence camest thou?
    Tell and inform us here,
    Speak to me; do not conceal it from me.'
  34. 'I say unto thee, O mild youth,
    With me the arch-kings cohabit,
    I am the majestic, slender damsel,
    The sovereignty of Alba and Eire.
  35. To thee I have revealed myself to-night;
    That is all; but thou shalt not cohabit with me,
    Thou shalt have a son, honored in him,
    He is the man with whom I shall cohabit.
  36. The name of thy son, the mode is good,
    Shall be Lughaidh Mor; he shall be a royal son,
    For we have been longing more for him,
    He shall be a druid, a prophet, a poet.'
  37.  p.77
  38. The prophecy which Daire mentioned to them,
    Regarding Maccon, the comely, was,
    'Maccon shall obtain the hill of Breagh [Teamhair]
    Alba and delightful Eire.'


Lughaidh Laighdhe and the other Sons

The following account of Lughaidh Laidhe and his brothers is given in the Coir Anmann264, as in the Book of Leacan, fol. 222b–223a —
“Lughaidh Laidhe and the other sons, &c. Let it be here enquired whence the additional names upon the sons of Daire Doimthigh, i. e. the five Lughaidhs, and what is the reason that each was called Lughaidh? It is not difficult to tell. It had been prophesied that one of his sons would assume the sovereignty of Eire, and that Lughaidh would be his name, wherefore each of the sons was named Lughaidh. The fair of Tailltin was celebrated by Daire, and his sons performed their horsemanship there; and the Druid said, “what good are thy sons, only one of them shall assume the monarchy of Eire.” Daire said to the Druid: “What son shall assume the sovereignty after me?” “A fawn with the bright color of gold shall arrive at the fair,” said the Druid, “and the son who shall overtake the fawn is he who shall assume the sovereignty of Eire after thee.” And the golden fawn arrived afterwards at the fair, and the men of Eire went in pursuit of it, and the sons of Daire followed it from thence to Beann Eadair, and a magical mist [here] arose between them and the men of Eire. The sons of Daire pursued it from thence to Dal-Meascorb, in Leinster, and Lughaid Laidhe, i. e. Maicniadh, overtook the fawn, and [another] Lughaidh had the flaying of the fawn, and hence is (called) Lughaidh Cosc. And a great snow afterwards fell, so that it was [great] work for them to carry or hold their arms. And one of them went in search of a house, and he found a large house with a great fire therein, and food and drink in abundance, and dishes of silver and beds of Findruine [German silver]; and there was a large hideous hag in the house. “O young man, what dost thou seek?” said she. “A bed till morning,”[replied the youth.] And she said, “if thou wilt come into my bed or couch to-night, thou shalt obtain it.” And the youth said that he would not, and he went out to his brothers. “Thou hast refused sovereignty and monarchy,” said she. The other brothers went in after him. She  p.79 asked of another man of them why he had come, and he said “for a wild hog, and I have eaten it alone.” “Lughaidh Orca shall be thy name among thy tribe,” said she. She asked the same of another man. “Nothing,” said he, “fell to my lot, but I fell asleep.” “That was sleepy,” said she, “and Lughaidh Cal shall be thy name among thy tribe,” said she. She asked the same of another man. “A wild fawn presented itself to me,” said he. “Lughaidh Laidhe shall be thy name among thy tribe, and thus it is.” Another man came to her and she asked him the same. “What they have left I have eaten,” says he. “Lughaidh Corb shall be thy name,” said she, “for corrupt is the thing thou hast taken.” Lughaidh Laidhe was the last who went into the house, and the hag said the same to him. “I met an ox,” said he, “and I devoured it alone.” “Lughaidh Laidhe shall be thy name,” said she, “among thy tribe.” Wherefore these names clung to them. At length Lughaidh Laidhe [Maicniadh] went with her into the house for food and drink. After this the hag lay down in the bed of findruine, and Maicniadh lay down after her in the bed, and it appeared to him that the light of her countenance was as the sun rising in the month of May, and the fragrance of her was as the smell of a flower garden. After this he cohabited with her, and she said, “Good is thy journey,” said she, “for I am the sovereignty, and thou shalt obtain Eire or one descended of thee shall.” They afterwards took new viands and old drinks, and cups were distributed to them alone, and he cohabited with the sovereignty. And in the morning they were without house or fire except the level mountain side, and their hounds were tied to their lances. After this they returned to the fair of Tailltin, and related the story of their adventures, and the men of Eire dispersed from the fair: whence it is said, the five Lughaidhs.”


 p.82

Appendix C

The Family of Dun-Cairbre

(From the Irish Penny Journal, pp. 241–42, 30th January, 1841)

The Castle of Dun-garbry, or properly Dun-Cairbre, signifying the Dun or Fort of Cairbre, is situate on a hill, on the south side, and not far from the mouth, of the Drowis, or Drobhaeis—a river very celebrated in Irish history—and the estuary of the beautiful Loch Melghe, (Melvin,) in the lower part of the county of Leitrim, bordering on the county of Sligo. Though marked on the maps made in the reign of Elizabeth as an important fortress, its ruins are now but inconsiderable, and consist only of a side wall perforated by an arched doorway. But, trivial as these vestiges are, they impart some historic interest to scenery of the most delightful character by which it is surrounded, and are valuable as a memorial of an ancient Irish family, once of great rank in the county, though now reduced to utter decay, at least in their original locality.

Dun-Cairbre Castle was erected by the chief of the Mac-Clanchys, or correctly Mac Fhlannchadha, a sept or clan who possessed the ancient district called Dartraidhe, the present barony of Rossclogher, and of which the Castle of Rossclogher, situate on an island in Loch Melghe, was their chief residence. The name of its founder and the date of its erection are not preserved; but the latter may with probability be referred to a period anterior to the reign of Henry VIII, as the Annals of the Four Masters record, at the year 1538, the death of a chieftain of Dun-Cairbre.

It may be proper to state that there are in Ireland two perfectly distinct families of the name Mac Fhlannchadha, or, as it is now more usually written, Clancy; first, the family of Thomond or Clare, some of whom were hereditary Brehons or judges to the O'Briains, and who were a branch of the Mac Conmaras (Mac-na-maras;) and, secondly, the family of Dartraidhe, who were hereditary chiefs of that district from a very remote period.

 p.83

The notices of the chiefs of this family, as preserved in the Irish Annals from the twelfth till the seventeenth century, will serve to convey a very vivid impression of the insecurity of life resulting from the unsettled state of society, and its retrogression towards absolute barbarism during this unhappy period of our history, and will teach us also to appreciate the blessings we derive from the progress which civilization has made within the last century.

1241. Domhnall Mag Fhlannchadha, chief of Dartraighe, died.

1274. Cathal Mag Fhlannchaidh, chief of Dartraighe, died.

1278. Ruaidhre, son of Toirrdhealbhach O'Concobhair, was slain by Gilla-Crisd Mag Fhlannchaidh and the inhabitants of Dartraighe, on he borders of Drum-Cliabh.

1301. William Mag Fhlannchaidh, chief of Dartraighe, was slain by Ualgharg, the son of Domhnall, son of Art O'Ruairc.

1303. Among these (the slain) was Muirceartach Mag Fhlannchaidh, chief of Dartraighe.

1337. Tadhg Mac Fhlannchadha, lord of Dartraighe, was slain by Corbmac, the son of Ruaidhre, son of Domhnall O'Concobhair, as were also numbers of others, in revenge of Seaan, the son of Domhnall. Great depredations were afterwards committed in Dartraighe by O'Concobhair, and the son of Muiris Mag Fhlannchaidh was killed while in pursuit of the prey.

1349. Aedh O'Ruairc defeated Flaithbheartach O'Ruairc, Donnchadh O'Domhnaill, and the people of Dartraighe. Aedh Mag Fhlannchaidh, chief of Dart-raighe, Gilla-Crist Mag Fhlannchadha, Lochlann, son of Aindilis O'Baeighill, and many others, were slain in the engagement.

1366. The O'Ruaircs went on a migratory excursion, accompanied by the people of Fearmanach; but the youths of Clann Muircheartach attacked and surrounded them, and killed Cathal Mag Fhlannchaidh, chief of Dartraighe.

1418. Tadhg, i.e. Mag Fhlannchadha, the son of Cathal, the son of Tadhg, chief of Dartraighe, died, having retired into a monastery, a fortnight previously; and his son Cathal assumed his place.

1420. Cathal, son of Tadhg Mag Fhlannchadha, chief of Dartraighe, was slain in his own house, together with Aedh Buidhe Mag  p.84 Fhlannchadha, about the festival of Brighid; by their own kinsmen, the brothers Tadhg, Muiris, and Enri.

1421. A nocturnal attack was made by Cathal O'Ruairc and his sons upon Mag Fhlannchaidh, on Inis Caein [an island] in Loch Melghe [Melvin]; and the guards of the lake, namely, the Mag Gollaighs [Mac Galloglai] delivered up the boats of the lake to Cathal and his sons. And Mag Fhlannchaidh Og was taken prisoner by them; and they took possession of Loch Melghe and its castle. Five of the sons of Mag Fhlannchaidh, and a great number of the men of Dartraighe were slain by them, after which [the rest of] the sons of Mag Fhlannchaidh went to Cairbre.

1532. Toirrdhealbhach, the son of Mag Fhlannchaidh, was killed by his own two brothers, on the threshold of Mag Fhlannchaidh's mansion; and Brian O'Ruairc destroyed much in Dartraighe, on account [i.e. in revenge] of this killing.

1536. Mag Fhlannchaidh, chief of Dartraighe, i.e. Fearadhach, the son of William, died. He was a charitable and humane man.

1538. The son of Mag Fhlannchaidh, Cathaeir, the son of Fearadach, the son of William, heir of the chieftainship of Dartraighe, died at Dun-Cairbre.

1578. Mag Fhlannchaidh of Dartraighe died: that is, Cathal Dubh, the son of Fearadhach, and his son, Cathal Og, assumed his place.

1582. Mag Fhlannchaidh of Dartraighe (i.e. Cathal Og) was slain by his own kinsman, Tadhg Og.

It appears from an inquisition taken at the Abbey of Creevelea, on the 24th September, 1603, that Cathal Og Mac Clanchy died on the 3rd of January, 1582, seised of the castle and manor of Dun-cairbre, and of the whole country called Mac Clanchy's country, leaving a son and heir, Cathal Dubh, then aged twenty-eight years.

It appears, however, that, in accordance with the Brehon law, the chieftainship of Dartraidhe passed at his death not to his son, but to the eldest surviving representative of the name, as an inquisition, taken at Rossclogher on the 3d of October in the same year, finds that the greater part of the country, including the castle of Dun-cairbre, and the castle and chief town of Rossclogher, &c were in the possession  p.85 of Malaghlin Mac Clanchy, who died so seised on the 13th of August, 1603, leaving a son and heir, Cahir Mac Clanchy, three years and ten months old at the time of his father's death; and it is stated that all these castles, lands, &c. were held of the king by knight's service in capite, but the quantity of the service was not ascertained by the inquisitors. By the will of this Malaghlin Mac Clanchy he bequeathed to his son and heir, Cahir, all his lands except such as were nominated wife's jointure; and to his wife, Katherine Ny Rourke, who was found to have been his legitimate consort, he bequeathed his Castle of Dun-garbry, as also his chief town called Rossclogher, in pawn of her marriage goods, until his heir should redeem it.

The property of the Mac Clanchys was confiscated after the rebellion of 1641, but their name is the prevailing one in the barony of Dartraidhe, or Rossclogher, to the present day.


 p.86

Appendix D

Pedigree of Ó h-Eidirsceoil Or O'Driscoll.

It is a very extraordinary fact that the pedigree of O'Driscoll, as given by all the Irish Genealogical Manuscripts now accessible, is less correct than any other line. It is in fact more than forty generations short from Lughaidh, son of Ith, down to Lughaidh Maccon, monarch of Ireland in the third century, but from that period forward it is as correct as any of the lines deduced from Oilill Olum. This fact, which has not been acknowledged by any of our critics or genealogists, may help to fix the real period at which the Spanish colony of the Clann-Breogain settled in Ireland, but this is not the place to discuss such a question.

Maccon, the last O'Driscoll given in the Book of Leacan, died, according to the Annals of the Four Masters, in the year 1418, and was therefore the reigning chief of Corca-Laidhe, when the Book of Leacan was compiled. The line has been continued till the beginning of the seventeenth century, by Keating265, the Four Masters, Dubhaltach Mac Firbisigh, and in a manuscript in the British Museum, (Harl. 1425, p. 25.)

 1
1. Maccon O'Driscoll, d. 1418,
2. Maccon, d. 1442,
3. Finghin, d. 1472,

Finghin (3.) splits into two branches:

 1
4. Tadhg d. 1472
5. Finghin,

 2
4. Conchobhar d. 1508
5. Conchobhar, m. Jane, daughter of Conchobhar Finn O'Mathghamhna 6. Sir Finghin, or Fineen, 266 m. daughter to Sir Owen Mac Carthy Reagh
7. Conchobhar, or Cornelius O'Driscoll, a captain in the Archduke country, living 1615. He was married to Ellen, daughter of Donnell Mac Swyne of Muskerry.

Fingin (5.) splits into two branches:

 1
6. Maccon,

 2
6. Conchobhar,

Conchobhar (6.) splits into three branches:

 1
7. Conchobhar, Tadhg, Finghin,


 p.87

Appendix E

Corca Laidhe

(The Society have been favored with the following note by the Rev. John Quarry, Rector of Clonakilty.)

Corca Laidhe, the territory of the O'Driscolls, is described in the Book of Leacan and Book of Ballymote267 as comprising originally the entire of the Diocese of Ross, and as extending from Beann-Fhinn to the Strand of Traigh-Omna, and thence westward to Frith-na-h-Imghona, and from a Ford called Beal-atha-buidhe to the Strand called Traigh-Claen where there is a great rock. Where Beann-Fhinn is situate I have been unable to ascertain; at least no place is now known by this name. But immediately over the present Church of Castleventry, nearly in the centre of the entire district described, there is a lofty hill called Knockfeen, I suppose properly Cnoc-Finn. The summit of this, which is a prominent point, might be intended by the name Beann-Fhinn, from whence the extent is measured in a south-westerly direction to Traigh-Omna, which is the present name of a Strand at the extreme south-west of the Parish of Castlehaven. Westward from this is an inlet called Lough Hina, which I have no doubt is a corruption of the ancient name as it appears in Frith-na-h-Imghona. This designation is very applicable to the district along the sea beyond Lough Hina, which is still unreclaimed as may be seen by the Ordnance Map. The place which I suppose to be Frith-na-h-Imghona is known by the name of Glanawhine, probably a corruption of another compound containing the same name. The Ford called Beal-atha-buidhe is on the Bandon river, and is still known by the same name. It is noted for a great fair, and is a central point on the north of the entire district. From thence the extent is measured in a south-easterly direction to the extreme eastern boundary of the district, the Broad Strand or Traigh-Claen, still known by this name, outside Court-mac-Sherry Bay. Off one extremity of this Strand is a dangerous rock known by the name of the Horse Rock, the great rock mentioned in the description. These,  p.88 together with the other identified localities, will be found marked on the accompanying map.

The district thus described is not exactly conterminous with the Diocese of Ross, which it is said to have comprised; as will be seen by the dotted line on the map which marks the northern boundary of the present Diocese, another district of which lies entirely separated from this beyond Bantry. The name Corca-Laidhe still exists in the corrupted form Cothluidhe, which name however is now confined to two small districts called Cothluidhe-mor and Cothluidhe-beag, situate on either side of the river Ilen near Skibbereen. This name is known to the country people though not appearing in the maps.

I. A subdivision of this territory is called the country of O'Gillamichil, and is described as extending from Tuath-na-h-Imghona aforesaid to the head of a harbour or inlet called Ceann-mara, and from Beann-t-Sidhain to Beal-atha-na-Seamann. Ceann-mara is the present name of the head or inmost part of the harbour of Castlehaven. Beann-t-Sidhain is the highest cliff on the Southern Coast of the Parish of Castlehaven, as still known by this name. I have not been able to find any name exactly corresponding to Beal-atha-na-Seamann. There is a ford over a stream falling into the river Ilen north of Skibbereen, called Ath-na-Seang, which might be a corruption of the name. But it more probably designates some ford over the Saivenose falling into the same river. In Smith's History of Cork, written more than a century back, this stream is called Savenesag. The latter part of this name as thus written is probably a corruption of uisge, “water”, and then the former part might represent Seamann by the (m) assuming an aspirate. And this is the more likely to be the stream on which is the ford in question, as we shall find that the next division also terminates with a ford over the same stream, which would thus form a natural boundary to this part of the territory. The Parish of Castlehaven, called also Gleann-Bearchan, forms a large part of this division. St. Bearchan is reputed to have been a prophet, one of his predictions, prior to the invasion of the Danes, having been that the Easterlings would come. There is a place in this Parish called Killchangil or Gillahangil, which probably contains a reminiscence of O'Gillamichil, “the big Vicar.”

 p.89

II. The next division called Tuath O'Coinned or the Garrdha, is described as extending from Ceann-mara, already identified, to Loch-an-Bhricin, and from Miross to the ford of Beal-atha-soluis. The Parish of Miross is still known to the country people by the name of Garry or the Garden, which is said to have formerly designated a larger district. Miross itself is situate a little west of the head of the harbour of Glandore. There is a ford over the Saivenose already mentioned, still known by the name of Ath-Soluis, and Loch-an-Bhricin is the present designation of a lake situate a little east of Glandore harbour.

III. The subdivision next to the Garry is called Tuath-Rois, which is plainly the district of Ross, or Tuath-Indolaigh, of which name a trace is to be found in the name of a rock in the Bay of Ross, west of the Gally Head, which is known to the country people by the designation of Carraigin Indolaigh, or in an abbreviated form Doolig. This district is described as extending from Loch-an-Bhricin already mentioned to Fidh-Ruis, and from the Strand of Traigh-long to the hill called Sidh-na-bh-fear-finn. Fidh-Ruis is no doubt the wooded and wild country immediately west of Ross, as implied by this descriptive and still applicable designation. Traigh-long is the present name of the Strand in a cove into which a stream falls from Loch-an-Bhricin. The lake is on high ground from which there is a great descent to a bog immediately inside the strand. This bog is lower than the sea, and passes under a white shingle for some distance into the water, which has in consequence the color of turf, and appears very remarkable when the sea is rough. I have not been able to discover any trace whatever of the name of the hill called Sidh-na-bh-fear-finn.

Iveleary, to which O'Leary is said to have removed, after the English invasion, from this district of which he was chief, is situate near Macroom; as also the Castle of Carraig-na-Corra. The first named in the list of his followers, O'Ruaidhre, probably gave name to the little river now called Rowry, which runs through this division a little to the east of Loch-an-Bhricin and Traigh-long.

IV. The next subdivision called Tuath O'n-Aenghusa is said to have extended from Fearsad-Ruis to the inlet called Goilin-na-Gaithneamhna,  p.90 and from Dun-Deide to Beal-atha-na-leice. Fearsad-Ruis, I suppose the strandpits of Ross, exactly describes the inlet at the west of the head of which Ross is situate, being choked at the entrance by sand, and when the tide is out presenting a muddy surface filled with pools of water left by the tide. Goilin-na-Gaithneamhna is the Goleen or inlet of Gahami, as it is now called, this being the name of the lands surrounding a little bay east of the Gally Head, called Traigh-Gahami, and also the Red Strand from a reddish-colored sand, famous all over this country for its fertilizing properties, and therefore drawn to great distances for manure. Dun-Deide is the peninsula which forms the Gally Head; the place where it joins the mainland was strongly fortified by the Castle of Dundeide, as it is still called. Close to this are very remarkable caves into which the sea runs, and boats can penetrate a great distance. One of them has an opening inland, through which in great storms the waves are thrown up. There is no place in this territory now known by the name of Beal-atha-na-leice, though there is a place so called near Bantry. A line, however, drawn from Dundeide to the northern part of the territory somewhat parallel to the lines which mark the extent of the preceding divisions in the same direction, reaches a Lake called Curraghalicky. A stream runs into this from the west, and proceeds from it in a north-easterly direction to the Bandon River. Dropping the former part of this name, Curragh, which I suppose is descriptive of the Lake, a ford over the stream would probably be called Beal-atha-na-leice. And as we shall have reason to think that the stream passing north eastward from the Lake is the boundary of the next division, Beal-atha-na-leice was probably over the stream at the west, perhaps where Curraghalicky-bridge is now situate.

V. The next division called Tuath O'Fithcheallaigh or O'Feehily's country is said to have extended from Goilin-na-Gaithneamhna already ascertained, to the Island of Inis-duine, and from Dun-Eoghain to Glaise-Droighneach. Inis-duine, or Inchydoney, is an Island in Clonakilty Bay, which constitutes a Prebend in Ross Cathedral. The point of it which projects farthest into the sea is called “the Virgin Mary's Point,” and on its summit are the impressions of a pair of knees supposed to have been made by the blessed Virgin herself.  p.91 However they were first made, there is no miracle in their preservation, as the people are in the habit of resorting to the spot and kneeling on them whilst offering a prayer. Dunowen is the name of a townland on the southern coast east of the Red Strand already identified with Goilin-na-Gaithneamhna. The remains of a castle, from which it takes the first part of the name, still exist. A line from Dunowen, parallel to those which measure the extent of the preceding divisions in a north-westerly direction, will reach the stream which runs from the eastern extremity of Curraghalickey Lake to the Bandon River. This stream bounds the lands of Drinagh in the Parish of Drinagh. We may safely assume that this name was originally spelled Droighneach, and that therefore the stream was called in the description of the territory Glaise-Droighneach.

The Parish of Ardfield on the southern coast of this division, taking the first part of the name from the great elevation of the ground on which the Church is built, which rises from the sea in very lofty and precipitous cliffs, contains in the latter part, no doubt, a corruption of the name of O'Fithcheallaigh, the chief of the district. Another remnant of the same is perhaps to be found in the name of the little stream which runs in a south-easterly direction to the town of Clonakilty, and was probably the boundary between this and the next subdivision. The name of this stream as given on the Ordnance Map is Fealge, but this spelling is of course arbitrary, and the name is commonly pronounced Feely or Feehily, and seems to be a corruption of Fithcheallaigh.

VI. The next subdivision is called Tuath-na-Donn-ghalaigh, and extends from Inis-duine, already mentioned, to Beal-atha-na-h-Uidhre, and from Greallach-na-g-Cruime to Achadha. Beal-atha-na-h-Uidhre is a ford over the River Airgidin, (silver stream, in sound and sense like Homer's ΑΡΓΥΡΟΔΙΝΕ,) about five miles westward from Clonakilty. It is known by this name as a place where two priests were murdered, in consequence of some matrimonial affair, and whose bodies were found in the river adjacent to the ford. Greallach-na-g-Cruime is now known only in the former part of the name. There are two places called Greallach or Grillach, either of which may have been intended. One is a townland on the Bandon River a little east of Ballybuy  p.92 already mentioned. This would carry the present division up to the northern boundary of the whole territory to which it probably extended. The other is on the River Airgidin, about a mile and half north of Clonakilty, and would serve as a point from which to measure the extent in an easterly direction, as the line from Inis-duine to Beal-atha-na-h-Uidhre does in a westerly. Achadha is the present name of a townland a short space inland from the Broad Strand or Traigh-claen, which has been already mentioned as the eastern limit of the territory as it is also of this division.

Amongst the followers of O'Domhnaill, the chief of this division, is mentioned O'h-Aedha of Cluain-da-Mhael. About a mile west from Clonakilty is the site of an ancient castle which stood upon a bold rock over a ford. The Castle belonged to the O'Heas, and the place is now called Aghamilla. The former part of this name being derived from the ford (ath), the latter might present some trace of the word which forms the latter part of Cluain-da-Mhael. This Castle was battered by Cromwell's forces, and only a small remnant of the foundation is now perceptible. A farmer, whose family has been long settled in the immediate vicinity, possesses a cannon ball found by one of his ancestors in the dyke of the roadside. The tradition is that the people were assembled to dance on a Sunday evening, when the battering commenced from a hill on the other side of the Castle, and that it fell almost immediately, being extremely ancient. O'Sealbhaigh is also mentioned, and this name is perhaps still retained in the small parish and the lands of Kilsallagh near Courtmacsherry within this division.

VII. The last division of the territory is called Tuath-Ui-Duibh-da-leith, and is said to have extended from Beal-atha-na-h-Uidhre to Beal-atha-buidhe, both already mentioned, and from Gortnadiha to Loch-an-Tairbh. Gortnadiha is a denomination of land very near Kilmeen Church, and Loch-an-Tairb or Lough-atariff, as it is commonly called in English, is a Lake in the western border of the Parish of Kilmeen.

J. Q.


 p.93

Appendix F

On the 4th of September, 1368, the Poers of the County of Waterford, having gathered all their forces, and being joined by O'Hedriscol of the County of Cork, and his gallies and men, sailed towards Waterford with an intention to plunder the city, which the Poers bore a great enmity to, on account of their fidelity and good government. John Malpas then Mayor, being informed of their designs, prepared to resist them, and accompanied by Walter Devenish, Sheriff of the County, Richard Walsh, Master of St. John of Jerusalem, with a number of merchant strangers and English, set himself at their head, and sailed towards the enemy. But the event did not answer these preparations. For the Poers with the aid of the western gallies of the O'Hedriscols set upon the city forces, and routed them. In this battle the Mayor, with the Sheriff of the County, the Master of the Hospital, thirty-six of the most worthy Citizens, as also sixty merchant strangers and English were slain. On the other side, the head of the Poers called Baron of Don-Isle, his brother Bennet Poer, with many of that sept, and numbers of the O'Hedriscols fell. The day following the Mayor was brought to the city, all hewen and cut to pieces, and was buried in Christ Church, and Richard Brasborne was immediately elected Mayor in his room.— M.S. Clogher, in College Library. Natural and Civil History of Waterford, 1746, by Charles Smith, pp. 125, 126.

In the year 1413, Simon Wickin, Mayor of Waterford, Roger Walsh and Thomas Sault, Bailiffs, surprised and took prisoners, O'Hedriscol, his family, and the rest of his followers in his strong castle of Baltimore in the County of Cork. They took with them a strong band of men in armour, on board a ship belonging to the city, and arrived at the castle on Christmas day at night. The Mayor landed his men and marched up to the gate, and called to the porter, desiring him to tell his lord, that the Mayor of Waterford was come to the Haven with a ship of wine, and would gladly come in to see him; upon this message the gate was set open, and the whole family made prisoners. — M.S. Clogher Coll. Libr. Ibid. 127.

 p.94

In the year 1450, Stat. 28, Hen. 6. No. 10. As divers of the King's subjects have been taken and slain by Finin O'Hedrischol, cheiftane of his nation, an Irish enemy, enacted, that no person of the ports, of Wexford, Waterford, &c. shall fish at Korkly Baltimore, nor go within the country of the said O'Hedrischol with victuals, arms, &c. and that proclamation be made of this by Writs in the parts aforesaid, under the penalty of the forfeiture of their goods, and ships to those who shall take them, and their persons to the King; and the town who receives the said O'Hedrischol or any of his men shall pay £ 40 to the King. — M.S. Clogher Coll. Libr. Ibid. p. 129. See the Statute itself post, p. 98.

On the third of June, 1461, the Mayor and citizens of Waterford being informed of the arrival of O'Hedrischol at Tramore, invited there by the Powers, (who always continued their rancour to the city) prepared themselves in warlike manner, and set forwards towards Ballymacdane, where they met the O'Hedrischols and Powers, gave them battle and gained a compleat victory, 160 of the enemy being slain, and some taken prisoners, among whom were O'Hedrischol Oge and six of his sons, who with three of their Gallies were brought to Waterford. — M.S. Clogher Coll. Libr. Ibid. p. 129.

On the 20th of February, 1537, four Portugal ships laden with Spanish wines, consigned to the merchants of Waterford, were driven by tempest to Cape Clear, Baltimore, and the old head of Kinsale. One of the ships called la Santa Maria de Soci, laden with 100 tun of wine, was driven into a bay adjoining to the entrance of the haven of Baltimore. Finen O'Hederischol Chieftane of the Island, Conogher his son, and Gilly Duffe his base son, came on board and covenanted with the Merchants for three pipes of wine, to conduct the ships safe into the haven. When the Gentry and Peers of those parts had tasted the wines, they forgot their safe conduct and invited the Merchants to dinner in the castle, seized and clapped them in irons, manned their Irish gallies and took the ship, and distributed 72 tuns of the wine among their neighbours.

On the 3rd of March news arrived of this action at Waterford. Immediately 24 men of the city with Pierce Dobbyn for their Captain, sailed in a Pichard, called the Sunday of Waterford, well armed, and the day following at noon arrived suddenly at the ship, and as  p.95 they boarded her on one side, Gilly Duff and twenty-four of his men fled out at the other. When the ship was won Pierce Dobbyn manned her, and set the prisoners at large, there remained of the wine twenty-five tuns and more, and taking a view of the castle they fired several guns at the great hall, and then sailed to Waterford.

On the 27th of the same month, the Mayor fitted out a little fleet consisting of the ship lately retaken, another large vessel, and the great galley of the city, well appointed with artillery, victuals, and men to the number of four hundred, and put them under the command of Bailiff Woodlock, as chief Captain, Pierce Dobbyn, James Walsh, James Sherlock, Henry Walsh and John Butler under Captains. On Wednesday the first of April at night they sailed, and arrived within the haven of Baltimore, and anchored towards the castle, which was guarded with men and artillery. They fired at it all night, and at the break of day the ward fled, and the Waterford men landed in good order in the island, and besieged the strong fortress there, the mariners entered the castle by the small port, and put up St. George's standard, and the army all entered at the Bridge-gate, and kept it five days, which they spent in destroying all the villages of the Island; and also the house of the Friers Minors near the castle, and the mill of the same. The fortress being double warded by two strong piles or castles, with walls, and barbicans, the halls, offices, &c. were totally ruined to the ground, and were tumbled into the sea. There was found in the island great store of malt, barley and salt. There was taken here Finen's cheif galley of thirty oars, and above three or four score pinances, of which about fifty were burned, and the great galley carried to Waterford. Near to Inishircan was an island called Inchipite, where Finen had his most pleasant seat in a castle, adjoining to a hall, with an orchard and grove, all which they destroyed and razed to the earth, and from thence they entered into another island, and burnt all the villages of the same. Then landing in the main they burnt and destroyed Baltimore, and broke down Teig O'Hederischol's goodly castle, and bawn.

On Tuesday in passion-week one William Grant was on the top of one of the castles, which being all on fire under him, he stood upon one of the pinnacles and cried out for help; Butler tied a small cord  p.96 to an arrow and shot it up to Grant, at which he drew up an hawser fastened to the cord, and fixing the hawser to the pinacle, slided down, and was received by his fellows on beds. After this, on Good Friday, the army arrived safe at Waterford. MS. Clogher, in Coll. Library. Ibid. pp. 140, 141. Smith's Cork, Book III. ch. 2.


Notes of certayne exploytes and hurtes done by the Powers of the Countie of Waterford and by the O'h-Edrisckolls of the west parte of Mounster upon the Cittizens of Waterford, and the reckonings of the said Citie upon them as followeth:

“The fourth day of September in Anno one thousand three hundred three score and eight, and in the x7th year of King Edward the Third, the Powers of the Countie of Waterford being over evill willers and enemies unto the Citie of Waterford for their good government, they and Raymond O'h-Edriskoll, with his Galleys and men to come unto them to the Countie of Waterford to endamadge the Cittizens, upon knowledge of their arryvall John Malpas, then Maior of the said Citie, prepared himself with a nomber of the best men of the said Citie, accompanyed with one Mr. Walter Devenishe, Sheriff of the said Countie, and Mr. Richard Walsh, Mr. of the Hospitall of St. John of Jerusalem, the Justices of the Peace of the said Countie, with a nomber of Merchant Estrangers, and Englysh men under the leading of the said Maior, sett forth themselves toward the said Galleys to encounter them, and at Glenoradmore in the said Countie, the said Powers with the ayde of them of the said westerne galleys, did sett upon the said Maior and his Company, whom the Powers meeting in severall Companies dispersed abroade, did bicker together, which bickering of their side, the said Maior with the said Sheriff and Justice of the Peace, with the nomber of thirtie-six of the best and worthiest men of the said Citie were slayne, and three score Merchant Estrangers and Englishmen were then slayne to the great losse and damadge of the said Citie. And of th' other side were then slayne the Baron of Don'hill and his brother Bennett Power, with divers of the Powers and of the O h-Edriskolls. And so on the 10th day of the  p.97 said moneth and yeare, the said Maior was brought dead to this Citie, all hewen and cutt to pieces, and so was buried at Chryst Church and then presently Richard Brusbone was elected and chosen Maior of the said Citie.”—

From the Carew MSS. No. 632, p. 254, per C. Nash.


Symon Wicken, Maior of Waterford, in journey with O'h-Idreskoll, Christmas Eve,one thousand four hundred and thirteen, Anno primo Henrici quinti.

“Symon Wicken Maior of the Citie of Waterford, Roger Walsh, and Thomas Saulter, Bayliffs, in the first year of his maioralty, with a band of men in armor, in a shipp of the forsaid Citie, went on Christmas Eve towards Balintimore, and in nyght on Christmas day at supper tyme landed his men, and in good order came to the gate of O'h-Idreskoll's greate house or castell within the said haven, and called to the porter and willing him to tell his lo. that the Maior of Waterford was come unto the haven with a shipp of wyne, and that he would gladly come in to see his lo. Upon notice thereof given by the porter to O'h-Idriskoll, the gate was set open, and the porter presently taken by the Maior and put aside, and so the Maior walked into the greate Hall, where O'h-Idriskoll and his kinsmen and friends, sitting at boordes made ready to supp, commanded O'h-Idriskoll and his company not to move or feare, for he would not, nor meant not, to draw no men's blood of the same house, more than to daunce and drinke, and so to departe. With that the said Maior toke up to daunce. O'h-Idriskoll and his Sonne, the Prior of the Friary, O'h-Ydriskoll's 3 brethren, his uncle and his wife, and leaving them in their daunce, the maior commanded every of his men to hold fast the said powers, and so after singing a carroll came away, bringing with them aboorde the said shipp the said O'h-Idriskoll and his company, saying unto them they should go with him to Waterford to syng their carroll, and make merry that Christmas; and they being all aboorde made sayle presently, and arryved at Waterford St. Steven's day at night, where with greate joy received they were with lightes.”—

From the Carew MSS. No. b 32268, p. 254, per C. Nash.


 p.98

An overthrow given by the Maior and Cittizens of Waterford upon O'h-Edriskoll at Ballymacdare, in the Countie of Waterford, the third day of June, Anno 1461

“The Maior and Cittizens of the Citie of Waterford being credibly informed of th'arryvall of O'h-Idriskoll, or Tramore being trayned thither by the Powers, who always continued in their ranckor and malice towards the Citie, the Maior and the Cittizens prepared themselves in warlike manner, and sett forward themselves with good courrage towards Ballimacdare, in the said Countie, where they, having mett with the said O'h-Idriskoll and the Powers, and so bickered together, where the Maior and his companions had the victory of their side, and several of the said O'h-Idriskoll's company and of the Powers were slayne then by the said Maior and his company, and some taken prisoners, and in especiall were taken then all prisoners, O'h-Edriskoll Oge with vi. of his sonnes, which were then brought to Waterford with three of their Gallyes.”—

From the Carew MSS. No. 632, p. 255, b; per C. Nash.


Item que lou diverse liege people du Roy ount este prise destruez et tuhez per un Ffynyn Ohedirskoll chefteyn de sa nacion le quell est irrois Enemye a notre seigneur le Roy et a tout-son liege people de la dit terre Sur que lez premissez considerez Ordine est per auctorite du dit parlement que null manere persone dez partiez de Weyesford, Waterford, Yoghill, Cork, Kynsale ne null aultre liege people pessheront a korkly Balthymore deins la pays du dit Ohedirskoll ne veigne deins la terre du dit Ohedirskoll ove vitaile ne armure mesque qils allont sur le dit Ohedirskoll en tout son pais come Enemiez a notre seigneur le Roy. Et que proclamacion soit fait sur ceo per lez briefs du Roy fait en lez partiez avauntditz sur la peine de forfactur de touz lour biens ove lour Niefs lez biens a ceulx que prendront et lez personez al Roy et en queconque vile le dit Ohedirskoll on ascun de sez homez soient receyvez ou tenuz encountre l'entent du dit proclamacion la persone et la vile que eulx receyvent paier au Roy xl li.”—

Rot' Stat' 28 H.VI. a 10.


 p.99

XVI

17. Surrender by sir Fynnyn O'Driskoill of Baltimore, knt. and Thomas Crooke of the same, esq. and each of them, of the lands recited in the article next ensuing.—{}May 5th.


XVII

18. Grant from the King to Thomas Crooke of Baltimore, Cork county, esq. Cork county. The territory, country or cantred of Collymore otherwise O'Driskall's country, and the soil, shore, and strand of the haven of Baltimore, with the islands of Inisherkine, Downygall, Capecleere and Inispicke, being parcel of the said cantred, which cantred extends by land towards the East on one side to the utmost bounds of two carucates of land of the Old Court near Drishen, on the other side to the utmost bounds of Drishenmore near Drishenbegg, and on another side to the utmost bounds of Randacassane near Ardgehan; to the North to the river of Downegall; to the West to the promontory of Capecleere and Inisherkane upon the sea; and to the South from Capecleere, to the utmost parts of Randacassane; and it extends by sea from Fashney rock by West Capecleere, to the rocks called the Staggs —the castle, town, and three carrucates of Baltimore, otherwise Downyshead, called by the common name of Tullagh, within the territory of Collymore —the town and 3 carucates of Ballialen-shahane —the like of Rathe —2 carucates of Old-Court otherwise Shane-CourtLaccaghane, 1 caruc.—Gortarde, 1 1/2 1 caruc—Moonnagh, 1 caruc.— Ringarogeh, 1/2 caruc.—Clay, 3 caruc.—Slewmore, 1 3/4 caruc.—Fearanacoishe, 1 1/2 caruc.—Gorterd, 1/2 caruc.—Gortilascah, 1/2 caruc.—Teignayne, Gortilasca, and Kilbeacon, commonly called the 3 quarters of DownygallArdaghe, 2 caruc.—Glanvigane otherwise Glanyfoyne, 1 1/2 caruc—Ballinard, 3 caruc.—Lacke, 2 caruc.—Gortivestre otherwise Gortivisir, 1/2 caruc.—Drishane, 3 caruc, all being within the said territory and island of Collymore, and lately being the demesne lands of Fynnin O'Driskoil, knt. and lately in the possession of Thomas Crooke; annual value, £10 Irish.—the chief rents, all in Irish money of £ 4 3s. 4d. out of 1 1/2 caruc. of Ferrencassie. £1 out of 1 1/2 caruc. of Balliarde and Glanifinne —£1 17s. 4d. out of 2 caruc. of the Old- Court —4s. 8d. out of Gortinvoher —£1 17s. 4d. out of 2 caruc. of Ardagh —15s. out of 3 caruc. and 3 gnives of Randacassane —3s. 4d. out of 1/2 caruc. of Annagh —2s. 3d. out of the 4 gnives of Clonegon —£4 15s. 4d. out of Sloughtea in Clere Island —and certain lands of  p.100 Cribage —£1 17s. 4d. out of Killinvy in the Island of Inisherkane —£1 out of 3 caruc. of Lacke —10s. out of 1 1/2 caruc. of Ballinarde; all which lands are in the territory aforesaid; with all the usual and legal customs, tolls, privileges, &c. belonging to sir Fynnin, or his ancestors, within the said country of Collymore and port of Baltimore.—Licence to hold a Thursday market at Baltimore; rent 6s. 8d.; also for courts leet and baron under 40s. to be held by seneschals of his own making; liberty to make parks with free warren and chace; to hold two fairs at Baltimore on the feasts of St. John the Baptist and St. Simon and Jude, and for two days following each; rent free.—To hold for ever, in capite, by the 20th part of a knight's fee.—3 Jul. 5th.

Inquisition taken at the towne of Roscarrybry in the County of Corke the viiith. day of April, in the sexth year of the Reign of our sovereign Lord James of England, &c. before William Lord Bishop of Cork (and another.) By the oaths of good, &c. who find that the bounds of the Country or Cantred of Colly More, alias called O'Driscoll's Country, are eastward the uttermost bounds of the two ploughlands of the Old Court towards Dryshen, and the furthest bounds of Drishane More, bounding upon Drishane Begg and the uttermost bounds of Randacassan, bounding upon the lands of Ardgehane, and northwards upon the Ryver of Downegal, and westward from Cape Clyre and Innyshirckane upon the mayne sea, and southward from Cape Clyre to the uttermost part of Randacassan. The land of Collymore, alias called O'Driscoll's Country, containeth threescoare and fyve ploughlands, that is to say, in the mayne lande thirtie nyne ploughlands and a half; in the illande of Downygall fower ploughlands; the illande of Innyshirckane nyne ploughlands; the illande of Cape Clyre twelve ploughlands; the illande of Innyspike half a ploughland. The whole illandes of Innyshirckane and Clyre are within the Lordship or Country of Collymore, and all Innyshirckane is within the parishe of Tullaghe. That Cnogher mac Fynine O'Dryscoll, grandfather to Donnoghe Karragh O'Dryscoll was quietly seized in his demesne of Downylonge, and the moiety of the lands and rents of the O'Dryscolls, and of the moietie of the royalties of the Harbrough of Baltymore, and that Conogher mac Conogher father to Sir Fynyne O'Dryscoll, was quietly seized in his demesne of Downeysheade, and  p.101 the other moyty of the lands and rents of the O'Dryscolls and of the other moyty of the dueties and Royalties of the Harbrough of Baltymore; and after the death of the said Conogher Mac Conogher O'Dryscoll, the said Sr. Fynyne entered into his father's moyty, and quietly enjoyed and possessed it as heir to his said father, that after the death of Conoghor mac Fynyne O'Dryscoll, father to Fynyne Karragh, and grandfather to Donogho Karragh, the said Sir Fynyne O'Driskoll entered upon that other moiety, and enjoyed the same until Fynyne Karragh, sone and heyre unto the said Conogher mac Fynyne and father to Donogho Karragh O'Driscoll, found himself grieved therewith, whereupon he commenced suit against Sir Fynyne for the whole loss, and by consent of both parties they were content to refer the hearing and determining of their controversy to John Meade of Cork, Esq. and Walter Coppinger of Cloughane, gent, who ordered between them as followeth, viz. that Sir Fynyne O'Driscoll should enjoy the lordships, rents, and Royalties of the Country and Harbrough of Cullymore, except only what competent lyvenge should be allotted by fower indifferent men of the said Cuntry of Collymore, for the said Fynyne Carrogh O'Driscoll, and upon the death of the said Sir Fynyne that then the lordship, rents and Royalties of the country and harbour aforesaid, should come and ennure to Fynyne Karragh, and that he should quietly enjoy the same during his life, allowing unto the son and heire of Sir Fynyne what competent lyvenge four of the said country should allot unto him, and after the death of Fynyne Karragh the said country rents, royalties, and duties of the Harbroughe to be equally divided between the heirs of the said Sir Fynyne and the heirs of the said Fynyne Karragh, and the said four men did not agree nor make any order during the lifetime of Fynyne Carragh, whereupon Donogh O'Driscoll, son and heir of the said Fynyne Karragh commenced suit against the said Fynyne O'Driscoll for the whole loss, and that upon a new communication between them they were content and did submit, and refer the hearing and determining of the said controversy to Walter Coppinger of Cloughane, gent, and Donell O'Donevane, alias O'Donevane of Castle O'Donevane, who have ordered and determined between them as followeth, viz. that the said Sir Fynyne O'Driskoll and his heirs should for ever hold and enjoy the lands and  p.102 rents ensuing, viz. the manor, town, and land of Downysheade, containing three ploughlands, together with the other lands called by the names following, viz. Ballylynshighane three ploughlands, the two plonghlands and a half, Lackaghan one ploughland, Gortt{} and Munagh two ploughlands and a half; the castle, town, and lands of Ballyillanethree ploughlands, Rynne Cormocke and Goahane one ploughland and thirty acres. The chief rents of the moiety of Sir Fynyne O'Driskoll, vizt. out of the ploughland and half of Farrencassy four pounds three shillings and four-pence, out of the ploughland and half of Glanny-Fyne and Ballinard twenty shillings, out of the two ploughlands of the Old Court thirty-seven shillings and four pence, out of Curtynvoher four shillings and eight pence, out of two ploughlands of Ardagh thirty-seven shillings and four pence, out of two ploughlands and three gnyves of Ryndacassin fifteen shillings, out of the half ploughland of Annagh three shillings and four pence, out of the four gnyves of Clonnegoy two shillings and three pence, in all amounting to the sum of ten pounds, three shillings and three pence. And they have also further ordered that the said Donogho O'Driskoll, son and heir of Sir Fynyne, should have and enjoy to him and his heirs for ever the lands and rents ensuing, viz. the Manor, town and lands of Downelonge, with the six ploughlands and half, viz. Sleavemore three ploughlands; and Rynedrolane half a ploughland; the Little Illande with the castle of Innyspicke half a ploughland; Glane and Cryhagh in the island of Clyre three ploughlands; the Castle, town, and lands of Downegall; and the island with Ringirrogy cont' four ploughlands; the two ploughlands of Drishane. The thirty acres of Comenyteady, the chief rent assigned for the moiety of Donogho O'Driskoll, viz. out of the lands of Sloughtea in the island of Clyre, whereof part is due upon other their lands of Chryhaghe, four pounds fifteen shillings, four pence. Out of the lands of Killmorny, in the island of Innyshirkane, thirty seven shillings and four pence; out of three ploughlands of Lacke twenty shillings; out of the ploughland and half of Ballinard {} in all amounting to the sum of eight pounds, two shillings and eight pence. It was further ordered to the said arbitrators, that the said Sir Fynyne during his natural life should hold from the said Donogho all the premises to him allotted and belonging, paying therefor  p.103 one penny per annum, (except only the Manor, Castle, and lands of Downelong, which the said Donogho is to enjoy until Sir Fynyne redeem the Castle and lands of Innyspicke, which the said Sir Fynyne hath mortgaged) and then to render the said two Castles, with such other lands as the said Donyll O'Donyvane and Walter Coppinger shall think fit to nominate for a competent living for the said Donogho, during the life of the said Sir Fynyne; it was also ordered by the said Donell O'Donovane and Walter Coppinger, that Sir Fynyne O'Driskoll himself should redeem the lands mortgaged by him, being parcell of Donogho Karraghe's moiety before the death of the said Sir Fynyne or at the least the heires or assigns of the said Sir Fynyne within two years after his decease, or otherwise in default of performance, the premises to allow unto the said Donnogho Karragh as much of the moiety of the lands of the son and heir of the said Sir Fynyne as should countervaile the same. The predecessors of O'Driskoll, lords of the said Country, have been always used to have divers Royalties, duties, and other customs from Fashney bewest Cape Clyre to the Rocks called the Stagges Eastward. The said Sir Fynyne O'Driskoll and his ancestors have been wont to receive as well from strangers as from their own tenants, the duties, customs, rents and royalties following, viz. that every ship and barcque that cometh to aunquer in any part of the said Harbrough of Baltymore, ought to pay to the chief lord for the time being four-pence sterling for his aunkeradge. That every man that in the said town, Harbrough, or Country selleth any maner of comodity or marchandize, ought to tender them unto the Lord, and if he will buy them to let him have them before any other, abating one shilling out of every twenty shillings of his price. And if the Lord refuse them to pay him eight pence of every twenty shillings they sell the commodities for, the same to be paid by the seller. That the Lord is to have as a Royalty out of a butt of wine landed in any part of the premises fower gallons and no more, though he had forty butts in one seller. And all the empty caskes that is there drawen, and to have two-pence abated in every gallon that he buyeth to spend in his own house. That no man ought to draw a Seyn in the said Harbour, nor in any part of the said country without licence first obtained from the Lord; if he do he is then punishable at the Lord's pleasure. That  p.104 the freeholders of the said Country are to tender any goods they have to sell unto the Lord, and to let him have the refusing of the same at the price another will give, but then he is to have nothing abated of the price, nor any thing if they sell to any other man after his refusal. But if they sell any other man's goods under that collor, they are punishable at the Lord's discretion. The Lord hath been wont to be Admiral of the Harbrough, and to have all wrecks within the Harbrough and Country time out of mind. That every ship or boat that cometh to the said Harbrough or town either to fish or sell his fish, the Lord hath these duties following, viz. every ship or boat that fisheth there is to pay the Lord in money nineteen shillings and two-pence, a barrell of flower, a barrell of salt, a hogshead of beer, and a dish of fish three times every week from every boat, viz. Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday, and if they dry their fish in any part of the said country they are to pay thirteen shillings for the rocke. That if any boat of them do chance to take a hollybutt they must give it to the Lord for a balle of butter, and if they conceal it from him xxiiii. hours they forfeit forty shillings to the Lord. That for every beef they kill they are to pay eight-pence, and for every sheep and pig that is killed likewise one penny. That every boat which is let in the Harbrough to fishermen, the Lord is to have of the latter six shillings and eight-pence for every hundreth white fish and every barrel of herrings or pilchers sold in any part of the premises, the Lord is to have the refusing, and eight-pence if any other buy them, which the seller is to pay. That every boat which fisheth in or from the said Harbrough between Fastness and the Stagges three nights, is to pay two shillings eight pence to the Lord, and fish three times every week, and if they dry their fish for their rockes six shillings and eight pence. That all ships, except his Majesty's subjects, are to pay for theire rockes to dry their fish on, twenty shillings out of every beef, all the interrelles, the tunge and tallow excepted, and six barrels of salt, and all other duties as is aforesaid, that the Lord may buy all the fish which is taken in the Harbrough or a sea board, by any of the fishers that fish here three days in the season, and he is to have all those three days two-pence better cheap in every dozen of white fish then the ordinary price there is, and those duties are to be levied by the Lord's bailiff by distress;  p.105 if any refuse to pay the bailiff, to have from every of the said ships a fish three times every week, and a barrel of salt for the whole season. That the town of Kyngsale was wont to appoint an Admiral for the fishing season, and then he and the Lord did join in settling orders for the fishing, and keep Admiral's Court every Monday, and all pecuniary punishments for breaking the orders agreed upon were to be equally divided between the Lord and the Admiral, but if Kyngsale did not send one Admiral then, the Lord might appoint one, and take the same course alone. That all fines for bloodsheddes belong to the Lord, which are eleven shillings six-pence for every bloodshed; that the Admiral for the fishing season and the Lord's Bailiff all the yeare ought to be assisted in the execution of their Offices by all the strengths in the Harbrough or Country. That whosoever is pilot to conduct any ship or barque of above ten ton out the said Harbour of Baltymore through the north-west passage without special license first obtained from the Lord or his Bailiff, forfeiteth to the Lord five pounds sterling. That whosoever goeth aboard any ship or barque coming into the said Harbour before the Lord or his Bailiff has been aboard them, or giveth license thereunto, forfeiteth for every time unto the said Lord twenty-six shillings and eight-pence sterling. That all waives, strayers, wreacks, and fellons' goods do belong to the Lord of Fee for the time being of auncient right. That the Lord hath alwayes had the ellection of the Constables, Bailiffs, and Clearcks of the markett in that whole Country or Cantred, and given them their oaths. That there hathe been alwaies tyme out of mynde in the town of Downesheade, otherwise called Baltymore, a contynuall markett for all manner of wares and marchandize whatsoever. The auncestors of O'Driskoll, commonly called O'Driskollmores, have for many hundred years held all the Country of Collymore as their auncient inheritance, accordinge to the custome of Tannystrie in this kingdome. And at this pointe Sir Fynyne O'Driskoll, eldest sone to Conoghor O'Driskoll, is in the possession thereof. But for the space of eleven yeares he had the moytie of the Country or Cantred aforesaid. And sithence that tyme he contynueth in possession of the whole twenty-fower yeares. That the country aforesaid hath been aunciently chardged by O'Driskolls' stronger neighbours, with certain rents, viz. To the Earles of Desmounde either  p.106 eight beeves or eight nobles sterling, at the ellecction of the said O'Driskolls, to be payed at the feastes of All Saints yearely. That the Lord Bysshopp of Ros-Carrbry is to have out of three ploughlandes of Tullagh twenty shillinges sterling yearely. And out of Kilmune, Sleave-More, Fancronan, Roscurryne, Ryndrolane, and Forryry, thirty six shillinges, sterling, yearely, paiable by even portions, viz. Michaelmas and Easter. The dueties taken for Mac Cartie Riogh upon the Cantred of Collymore, are by the names of Cwd-Ihye fower poundes, thirteen shillings and fower-pence sterling, Irishe. Alsoe a Rente, called in Irishe by the name of Dwff Yeeks, or blacke rentes, three poundes, two shillinges, and two-pence halfe-penny sterling, for Dolly Sawny and Baultyny, or Cesse at May and Michelmas, nyentine poundes, sixteen shillinges and five-pence sterling currency money in Englande, by even portions vizt. as above specified. That Slught Teige I-Driskoll are freeholders of seven ploughlandes wantinge twoe gnyves, the rents whereof are recited in the division above mentioned between the said O'Driskolls. That Slught Donoghy Y-Driskoll are freeholders of a quarter, vizt. three ploughlandes wanting three gnyves, the rents whereof by their severall names are recited in the division as above specified. That Slught Dermody I-Driskoll are freeholders of half a quarter, vizt. a ploughland and half, the rents of them likewise are recited in the division as aforesaid. That Slught-en-Naspigg are freeholders of a quarter, viz. three ploughlandes, the rents of them likewise are recited in the devision between the said parties aforesaid. That Slught Mac Hanyse are freeholders of two ploughlandes, their rents likewise are recited in the division as above written. That Mwynter Y-hilligh of Bally Mac Crarane, are freeholders of a quarter, viz, three ploughlandes, the rents of them likewise are specified in the devision above written. That Slught O'Driskoll are freeholders of fower quarters, vizt. twelve ploughlandes, the rents of them are also recited in the devision as above written. That Donogho McFynyne ne Longye of Annaghe is freeholder of half a plough- land, called by the name of Annagh, the rents whereof is recited in the devission as above written. There was also shewen unto the said Commissioners a Deed of feoffment made by Sir Fynyne O'Driskoll, Knight, Dame Ellen his wife, and Walter Goolde of Corcke, merchant,  p.107 of the Lordeshipp, Country and Cantred of Collymore, and of all the Royalties, profits and comodities we [to] the same belonginge together with thirtye-five ploughlandes and a quarter of demeasne landes unto Thos. Crooke, Esquire of Baltymore aforesaid, now in the possession thereof, as by the said Deed particularly may appear; the tenor whereof enseweth in hec verba: To all Christian people, &c. There was also sheowen unto the said Commissioners a letter of attorney, bearing date the first of August, 1600, made by Sir Fynyne O'Driskoll Knight, Dame Ellyn his wife, and Walter Golde of Corcke, merchante, unto Edmond Knapp, for the delyvery of possession with lyvery, and seison of all and singler the premises, accordinge to the purporte and effect of the said feoffement, as by the said letter of attorney more at large may appeare. There was also sheowen unto the said Commissioners a feoffment made by Donald MacCartie, alias MacCartye Rioghe of Kilbrittane, Esq. unto Sir James Lancaster of the City of London, Knt. his heyres and assigns, bearing date the nyenteenth day of February, 1605, whereby yt appeareth that the said Donyll Mac Carty hath infeoffed the said Sir James Lancaster, his heyres and assigns, of all Castells, landes, rents, &c. within the said whole country, cantred, or division of Collymore in the county of Corke aforesaid, as by the said deed doth at large appeare. There was alsoe sheowen unto the said Commissioners a letter of Attorney under the hand and seal of Sir James Lancaster, Knight, bearing date the thirde day of May, 1606, thereby gevenge full power and authority unto Thomas Crooke, aforesaid, his lawful attorney, and assiegny to deale in and dispose of the premises at his will and pleasure, as by the said letter more at large may appeare. There was also sheowen unto the said Commissioners a noate of the royalties, customes and dueties before specified with his superscription followenge, viz. A true noate, &c.
Com. annex.

Inq' capt' apud vill' de Bandonbridge in Com' Cork vicesimo die Augusti anno regni domini Caroli, &c. octavo, coram Wilielmo Wiseman ar' Escaetore domini regis Com' pred' (et alio) per sacramenta proborum, &c. qui dic' quod Fynnyne O'Driscoll nup. de {} de et in vill. et de Downesheade et x carr. terrae et dimid' un' carr' terr' in {} un' carr' terr' de Lacaghane, un' carr' et dimid' carr' vocat' Gort {}  p.108 {} capital' reddit' trigint' et septem solidor' de Ouldcourt et annual' reddit' {} an. reddit' trigint' et septem solid' de et ex Ardagh {}dic' solid' et quatuor de et ex Clonegon. Et ulterius Juratores pred' dic' quod {} sic inde seisit' existen' unacum Walter' Gould {} geren' dat' primo die Junii anno domini 1606 feoffaver' inde Thoma' Crooke de Dromea {} in Com' pred' {} Prout per pred' fact' plenius apparet: cujus quidem tenor sequit' in hec verba: To all Christian people, &c. Et ulterius Jur' pred' dic' quod Thomas Crooke, Fynnyn O'Driskoll, et Walter Coppinger per fact' eorum geren' dat' vicesimo die Junii anno domini 1610 {} concesserint omnia premiss' pred' cuida' Thome Bennett executor' et assignat' suis prout per pred' fact' plenius apparet: cujus quidem tenor sequit' in hec verba: This indenture made, &c.

Et ulterius Jur' pred' dic' quod pred' Thomas Crooke seisit' existen' de omnibus predictis per fact' suu' geren' dat' vicesimo secundo die Julii anno domini 1610 concessit rer' con' premiss' prefat' Walter' Coppinger et hered' suis in perpetuum prout per fact' pred' plenius apparet cujus quidem tenor sequit' in hec verba: To all Christian people, &c. Et ulterius dic' quod pred' Thomas Crooke, per fact' 'suum geren' dat' octavo die Novembr' anno regni nuper Regis Jacobi Angl.' &c. nono, relaxavit omnia premiss' pred' prefat. Walter' Coppinger et hered' suis in perpetuum prout per pred. fact' plenius apparet: cujus quidem tenor sequit' in hec verba: To all Christian people, &c. Et ulterius dic' quod Donat' O'Driscoll de Downenylonge in Com' pred' per fact' suum geren' dat' primo die Marcij anno domini 1608 feoffavit pred' Walter' Coppinger et hered' de omnibus premissis pred' et de tribus carr' terr' de Ballinshighane ann' val' VIs. ac de tribus carr' terr' de Ballinelane ann' val' VIs. ac de trigint' acr' terr' de Gohane ann' val.' VId. jacen' in Com' Cork prout per pred' fact' plenius apparet: cujus quidem tenor sequitur in hec verba: To all Christian people, &c. Et ulterius' Jur' pred' dic' quod pred' Walter' Coppinger in possessione existen' de omnibus premiss' pred' ad usum ipsius Walter' et hered' suorum pred' Fynyn O'Driscoll per fact' suum geren' dat' duodecimo die April, 1611, relaxavit omnia premiss' pred' prefat' Walter' Coppinger et hered' suis in perpetuum prout per pred' fact' plen' apparet: cujus quidem tenor sequit' in hec verba: Omnibus Christi fidelibus ad quos, &c. Et ulterius Jur' pred' dic' quod pred' nup'  p.109 Rex Jacobus decimo die Julii anno regni sui Angl. &c. octavo, per literas su' patent' concessit licenc' prefat' Thome Crooke alienand' omnia premiss' pred' prefat' Fynyn O'Driscoll, Walter' Coppinger, et Donat' O'Driscoll et liber' tenent' com' pred' et hered' suis. Et ulterius dic' quod septimo die Novembr. anno regni dicti nuper Regis Jacobi Anglie, &c. nono, pred' Fynnyn O'Driscoll, dna Ellyn' uxor ejus, et Thom' Crooke levaver' finem de omnibus premiss' pred' pre fat' Walter' Coppinger et hered' suis. Postremoque jurat' pred' dic' quod omnia premiss' pred' tempore confection' seperal' alienac' pred' tenebantur de dicto nuper Domino Rege Jacobo in capite per servic' mil'.

Inquisit. capta apud Bandonbridge in Com. Cork decimo quarto die Augusti 1630, coram Phillippo Percival, Wilielmo Wiseman ar. Escaetor' domini regis Com. pred' (et alio) per sacram' probor', &c. qui dicunt quod Dermott MacConnogher O'Driscoll de Castlenard juxta Baltimore in Com. Corke predict' seisitus fuit de feodo de undecim gneeves de terra de Castlenard predict' in Com. pred' val' per annum vigint' et duor' denar'. Et quod predictus Dermott MacConnogher O'Driscoll sic inde seisitus existens per factum suum gerens dat' vicesimo primo die Novembris anno domini millesimo sexcentessimo vicessimo octavo alienavit quinque gneeves parcell' predict' undecem gneeves de Castlenard predict' cuidam Johanni O'Crowly de Gortard gen' et hered' suis in mortgag' suum et trigint' et duo libr' sterl' sub condicion' redemptionis. Et ulterius dicunt quod predict' Dermott obiit de et in resid' premiss' decimo die Septembris anno domini 1629. Et quod Margaret ny Dermott est ejus filia et unica heres et etatis duorum annorum tempore mortis predict' Dermot patris sui et non maritat'. Postremoque jurat' predict' dicunt quod omnia premissa tenentur de Domino rege in capite per servic' militar'.

Inquisit' capt' apud Bandonbridge in Com. Cork decimo quarto die Augusti anno domini regis Caroli, &c. sext' coram Philippe Percivall, Wilielmo Wiseman ar' Escaetor' domini regis Com. pred' (et alio) per sacram' probor', &c. qui dicunt quod Hugo MacKnoghar O'Driscoll de Farreneconshey in Com. Cork predict' seisitus fuit de feodo de novem gneeves terr' jacen' et existen' in occidental' partibus de Farreneconshy predict' in Com. Corke predict' val' per annos duor' solid'. Et sic inde seisitus obiit decimo die Novembris viginti et quatuor annos  p.110 preterit' aut eo circiter. Et ulterius dicunt quod Cornelius MacHugh O'Driscoll est ejus filius et heres et fuit etatis trigint' et un' annorum tempore mortis Hugonis MacKnogher O'Driscoll predict' patris sui et maritat. Postremoque Jur' predict' dic' quod omnia premissa tenentur de Domino rege per servicium militare.

Inquisit' capt' apud Bandonbridge in Com. Cork decimo sexto die Septembris anno regni domini Caroli, &c. septimo, coram Phillippo Percivall, Wilielmo Wiseman ar' Escaetor domini regis com. pred' (et alio) per sacram' probor', &c. qui dicunt quod Maccon O'Driscoll alias Maccon Gorme O'Driscoill seisit' fuit de feodo de castr' et duobus carrucat' terrae de Donegalle ann' val' v solid. Et de dimid' carrucat' terr' de Gortilasca ann' valor' xv d. Et de dimid' carrucat' terr' de Glane Srirhaghe in insula de Capecleere ann val xv d. Et de novem gneeves terrae de Gokane, ann. val. xxid que omnia premiss' pred' jacen', &c. existen' in Com. Cork pred. Et sic inde seisit' existens obiit sic inde seisit' existen' circa trigint' annos jam ultim' elapsis. Et quod Fynyn O'Driscoll alias Carraghe fuit ejus nepos et prox' heres vizt. fil' et hered' Conoghor O'Driscoll fratr' et proxim' hered' predict' Maccon et quod fuit etat' viginti et septem annor' tempore mort' pred' Maccon et maritat'. Et ulterius dicunt quod pred. Fynyn postea obiit scilicet decim' die Septembris anno domini 1609. Et quod Donnoghe Carraghe est ejus filius et heres et plen' etat' tempore mort' pred' Fynyn et maritat. Postremoque jurat' pred' dicunt quod omnia premiss' pred' tempore mort' pred' Maccon et Fynin tenebantur de nuper domina nostra regina Elizabetha et de domino nostro rege Jacob' respective in capite per servic' mil', vizt. per tertiam partem unius feodi mil'. Et ulterius dicunt quod Donnoghe O'Driscoill clamat premiss' pred' esse jus suum et hereditat'. Et quod annual' reddit', debit', et solubil' est MacCarty Reoghe ex pred' premiss'.

Inquisit' capt' apud Bandonbridge in com' predicto nono die Octobris anno regni domini Caroli, &c. octavo, coram Peregrine Banaster, Wilielmo Wiseman ar' Escaetor' domini regis Com' pred' (et alio) per sacram' probor', &c. qui dic' quod Teige O'Driskoill de Byaledwilveige in Com' predicto gen. seisitus existens de feod' de vill' et terr' de Lacken Coskerane et Faneadrill in Com' pred' contin' un' carucat' terr' annui valor' trium solidor' per chartam suam dat' quarto  p.111 die Decembris anno domini 1631, in consideration' summe quadragint' librarum, &c. (licencia domini regis inde prius non obtent') feoffavit inde Argentum Hull arm' hered' et assign' suos in perpetuum per modum mortui vadii sub condicione redemptionis. Et quod premissa pred' tenentur de Domino Rege in capite per servic' militare, videlicet per decimam partem unius feodi militis. Et jurat' pred' ulterius dicunt quod Johannes Monyghane de Bwolyhillaghe in Com' pred' seisitus existens de feodo de dimid' unius carrucat' terr' de Bwolyhillaghe pred' in Com' pred' annui valor' viginti denar'. Et sic seisit' existens per chartam suam dat' septimo die Septembris anno domini 1631, in consideration' summe sexagint' librar' (licencia domini regis inde prius non obtent') feoffavit inde prefat' Argentum Hull heredes et assign' suos in perpetuum per modum mortui vadij sub conditione redemptionis. Et quod pred' premiss' tenentur de Domino Rege in capite per servic' militar' videlicet per decimam partem unius feodi militis.

Inquisit' capt' apud the Kings Ould Castle in Com' Cork decimo septimo die Septembris anno regni domini Caroli, &c. nono, coram Pho. Percivall, Willo. Wiseman ar' Escaetor' domini regis Com' pred' (et alio) per sacram' probor', &c. qui dic' quod Cnoghor MacDermod O'Driskoill de Glanefyne in Com' pred' gen' seisitus fuit de feodo de duobus carrucat' terr' de Glanefyne pred' in Com' pred' annual' valor' decem solidor'. Et sic seisitus existens obiit inde seisitus primo die Augusti anno domini 1629. Et quod Moriertagh MacCnogher O'Driskoill est ejus filius et prox' heres' ac fuit plene etat' tempore mortis patris sui pred' et maritat'. Et quod premissa pred' tenentur de Domino Rege in capite per servic' mil', videlt' per vicesimam partem unius feodi mil'.

Inquisit' capt' apud Bandonbridge in Com. pred' decimo quarto die Octobris, anno regni domini Caroli, &c. quinto, coram Wilielmo Wiseman ar' Escaetor' domini regis Com' pred' (et aliis) per sacram' probor', &c. qui dic' quod Fynen O'Driscoll alias Carragh nuper de Donalonge in Com' Corke pred' gener' seisit' fuit de feodo de Castro vill' et terr' de Donolonge in Com' pred' contin' tres carrucat' terr' valor' per annos viginti solid'. Ac de una carrucat' et tertia parte unius carrucat' terr' in tribus partibus divis' in Sleamore in dicto Comitatu valor' per ann' octo solid'. Ac de dimid' carrucat' terr'  p.112 de Glaniragy in Insula de Cape Clare in dicto Com. valor' per ann' duor solid'. Ac de dimid' carrucat' terr' de Gortydrobid in Insula de Donogall in dicto com' valor' per ann' duor' solid'. Et sic seisitus existens per chartam suam dat' vicesimo quinto die Novembris anno domini 1599 feoffavit David Hurley de Ballynecurrigg in dicto Com' gen. de pred' Castro de Donolonge et duabus carrucat' terr' dicto Castro partem vocat', per nomina de Lacklae ad opus et usum Onore ny Ranell uxor' dicti Fynen duran' vita natural' dic' Onore et post ejus decess' ad usum rector' hered' dicti' Fynen O'Driscoll. Et sic seisit' existens obiit sic inde seisitus decimo die April anno domini mylessimo sexcentessimo. Et jur' pred' dic' quod post mortem dicti Fynen O'Driscoll alias Caragh domina Onora relict' ejusdem Fynen virtute dicti feoffament' intravit in dicto Castro de Donolonge et dictis duabus carrucat' terr' de Lacklae et percepit exit', &c. dict' premiss' durant' termino sexdecem annorum tunc prox' sequent' et tunc obiit. Et quod Conoghor MacFynen fuit filius et heres dicti Fynen O'Driscoll, et fuit plene etatis tempore [mortis] dicti patris sui et non maritat'. Et quod dictus Conoghor post mortem dicti patris sui intravit in omnia predic' premiss' (except' predic' Castr') et dictas duas carrucat' terr' de Lacklae. Et fuit inde seisit' de feodo. Et sic inde seisit' existens vicesimo nono die Septembris anno domini 1606 obiit sic inde seisit'. Et quod Donnogh O'Dryscoll est ejus frater et heres et fuit plene etatis tempore mortis dicti fratris sui et non maritat'. Et quod omnia premiss' tenentur de Domino rege in capite per servicium militare.

Inquisit' capt' apud the King's Ould Castle in Com. Cork decimo septim' die Octobris 1636, anno regni domini Caroli, c. duodecimo, coram Wilielmo Fenton mil' (et alio) per sacram' probor', &c. qui dic' quod Daniel MacCarty alias MacCarty Reigh, nuper de Kilbrittan in Com. Cork ar' seisit' fuit de feodo de maner' de Kilbrittan contin' trigint' et tres carrucat' terr' viz. in carrucat' terr' de Kilbritten pred' Ballybeg et Ballymore contin' un' carrucat' terr' Carriggin, Ignory et Baltyn Ignyn contin' un carrucat' terr' Coolesynagh contin' dimid' unius carrucat' terr', Burren contin un' carrucat' terr' Ardicroe contin' un' carrucat' terr', Rathclaren contin' un' carrucat' terr', lez du' Glannduffes ex parte oriental' et occidental' contin' un' carrucat' terr' Shanyquill contin' dimid' un' carrucat' terr' Garranfyne contin' un' carrucat' terr'.  p.113 Coolenypisse contin' un' carrucat' terr' Cnocknygapull contin' un' carrucat' terr'. Et quod pred' Daniel sic inde seisit' existens per fact' suum debit' perfect' decim' nono die Januarii anno domini 1623, feoffavit inde Theobald Roch milit' Teige MacCormick Carty, Cahir O'Callaghane, David Nangle, et John Roch Fitz Nichol hered' et assign' suos ad cert' us' prout per fact' pred' dat' eodem die et anno plenius apparet, cujus quidem tenor sequitur in hec verba: To all faithful people to whom, &c. Et ulterius jur' pred' dic' quod pred' Daniel MacCarty Reagh seisit' fuit similiter de feodo de vill' terr' et tenement' de Downedanier alias Skeachinannyhis contin' un' carrucat' terr' Ballymontyre contin' un' carrucat' terr' Cloghvodowny contin' un' carrucat' terr' molendin' de Downedamer, Ratharowne contin' un' carrucat' terr', Cluoncuose contin' dimid' un' carrucat' terr', Tralong contin' un' carrucat' terr' Cnockmuckyfynny contin' un' carrucat' terr', Cnockane-Eaden, et Currygulligan contin' un' et dimid' carrucat' terr', Tullelane conin' un' corrucat' terr'; Scoghbane contin' un' carrucat' terr'; Gortruoc et Downegannon contin' un' carrucat' et tres gneeves terr'. Que omnia premiss' contin' in toto undecim carrucat' et tres gneeves terr'. Et quod pred' Daniel sic inde seisit' existens de premissis pred' per fact' suum debit' perfect' vicesimo primo die Januarii anno domini 1635, feoffavit cuid' Donogh O'Callaghane, Daniel Oge Hurly, Eddmond Fitzmorris et Richardum Fitzgerald, hered', et assign' suos ad cert' us' prout per fact' pred' dat' eisdem die et anno plenius apparet, cujus quidem tenor sequit' in hec verba: To all Christian people, &c. Et ulterius jur' pred' dic' quod Ellinora Carty alias Gibbon seisit' est durant' vita sua natural' ut junctur' sua de maner' de Gortnaclohy existens septem' carrucat', viz. lez tres carrucat' terr' pertinen' castro Munnyvohillighane contin' un' carrucat' terr' Rahynenyboull contin' un' carrucat' terr', Downyne contin' un' carrucat' terr,' et Ardgihane contin' un' carrucat' terr', et redem' et reversione inde et de omnibus aliis premiss' expectan prefat' Daniel et hered' suis in perpetuum. Et ulterius jur' pred' dic' quod pred' Daniel MacCarty seisit' fuit similiter de feodo de Castr' et sex carrucat' terr' de Coolemeany, vizt. lez du' carrucat' terr' pertin' pred' Castr' Glann-Ivade contin' dimid' unius carrucat' terr' et Garranbeg contin' un' carrucat' terr'; Coorlomaine contin' dimid' un' carrucat" terr'; Banea contin' dimid' un' carrucat' terr'; Ballyvatten contin' dimid' un' carrucat'  p.114 terr'; Cluoynebuogge contin' dimid' un' carrucat' terr', et Cnoopoge contin' dimid' un' carrucat' terr', que pred' sex carrucat' terr', ultim' recitat' exist' dimis' Vincentio mil'. Et ulterius jur' pred' dic' quod pred' Daniel Mac Carty Reogh similiter seisit' fuit de feodo de le dimid' carrucat' terr' de Cluanedirrin, le dimid' carrucat' terr' de Ratharrownebegge, lez du' gneeves de Lyshine-Iline, lez tribus gneeves de Killydirry, lez tribus gneeves terr' de Gurtyne-Itanntaliffe, et Liscoghlane, lez du' gneeves de Blooyd, le Cnocks contin' un' carrucat,' et un' gneeve terr' lez trib' gneeves terr' de West Dromnegarruffe, Killvurrow, contin' dimid' un' carr' terr', lez tres gneeves et dimid terr' Lissnydirrane et Maule-Iculligg et Easte Ratharrowne contin' un' carrucat' terr' val' in toto quatuor libr'. Et ulterius jur' pred' dic' quod pred' Daniell MacCarthy Reogh seisit' fuit de annual' reddit' viginti trium libr' octodecim solid' novem denar' et un' quadran' ster', anglice a smulkin exeun' ex toto cantred' de Ivaghe, vizt, annual' reddit' trium libr' et quatuor decem solid' ster' exeun' ex novem carrucat' terr' de Ardintennane, viz. ex qualibet carr' terr' equaliter diviss' sunt octo solid' et du' terc' part' unius drachme anglicè two Bungall's ster' ac etiam de annual' reddit' quatuor' libr' octodecim solid' et octo denar' ster' exeun' ex lez duodecim carruc' terr' de Leamcon, vizt. ex qualibet carruc' terr' equaliter diviss' summa octo solid' et du' tertiarum partium unius drachme ster'. Et de octo solid' et du' tertiis partibus unius drachme ster' annuatim exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de lez quinque carrucat' et dimid' terr' de Downemeanus. Ac de octo solid' et du' tertiis partibus unius drachme ster' annuatim exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de lez tribus carrucat' terr' de Bygalldwillin. Ac de octo solid' et du' tertiis unius drachme ster' annuatim exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de lez tribus carrucat' terr' de Downeloghy, ac de vigint' quatuor solid' et octo denar' ster' annuatim exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de lez tribus carrucat' terr' de Downebeaton. Ac de quatuor solid' et un' tertia parte unius drachme ster' annuatim exeun' ex dimid' carrucat' terr' de Derryvanten. Ac de duodecim solid' et quatuor denar' ster' annuatim exeun' ex le carrucat' et dimid' terr' de Cloghine et Cahir. Ac de octo solid' et du' terc' part' unius drachme ster' annuatim exeun ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de Lysycahy et Croggine contin' du' carrucat' terr'. Ac de octo solid' et du' tertiis  p.115 partibus unius drachme ster' annuatim exeun' ex Drishane contin' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac de vigint' solid' et sex denar' et due quadran' ster' annuatim exeun' ex Shantullaghe contin' du' carrucat' et dimid' terr'. Ac de octo solid' et du' tertiis partibus unius drachme ster' annuatim exeun' ex carrucat' terr' de Cashill-Tain. Ac de octo solid' et du' tertiis partibus unius drachme ster' annuatim exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de lez tribus carrucat' terr' de Callary-Ightraghe et Callry-Voghtragh. Ac de vigint' quatuor solid' et octo denar' annuatim exeun' ex lez du' Balline Mac Craghs contin' tres carrucat' terr', viz. octo solid' et du' terc' part' unius drachme ster' anglice two Bungalls per carrucat' terr'. Ac de duodecim solid' et quatuor denar' ster' annuatim exeun' ex Cloghane-Iculline continen' un' carrucat' et dimid' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac de quatuor solid' et un' tert' part' unius drachme ster' annuatim exeun' ex dimid' carrucat' terr' de Cahirreleckine. Ac etiam de duodecim solid' et quatuor denar' ster' annuatim exeun' ex Carnebegg-Cnoriske contin' un' carrucat' et dimid' unius carrucat' terr', viz. octo solid' et du terc' part' unius drachme anglice two Bungalls ster' per carrucat terr'. Ac etiam de duodecim solid' et quatuor denar' ster' annuatim exeun' ex Innaghboghtirr contin' un' carrucat' et dimid' terr'. Ac de un' solid' et sex denar' ster' annnuatim exeun' ex Gubbine contin' un' carrucat' terr' ac de un' solid' et undecim denar' ster' annuatim exeun' ex Crookehaven contin' un' carrucat' et dimid' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac de un' solid' et undccim denar' annuatim exeun' ex Fossye et Lissygriffyne contin' un' carrucat' et dimid' unius carrucat' terr'. Ac de un' solid' et undecim denar' annuatim exeun' ex Carren-Iglavine contin' un' carrucat' et dimid' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac de un' solid' et undecim denar' ster' annuatim exeun' ex Dwagh contin' un' carrucat' et dimid' unius carrucat' terr'. Ac de quinque solid' et novem denar' ster' annuatim exeun' ex Carrowcloghaghe contin' tres carrucat' terr' viz. un' solid' et undecim denar' per carrucat' terr'. Ac de novem denar' ster' annuatim exeun' ex Killiane et Lynanagh contin' un' carrucat' et dimid' un' carrucat' terr.' Ac de un' solid' et undecim denar' ster' annuatim exeun' ex Mallyvoge et Lackin-Mac Ea, contin' un' carrucat' et dimid' un' carrucat' terr'; ac de un' solid' et undecim denar' ster' annuatim exeun' ex Downekilly contin' un' carrucat' et dimid' terr'  p.116 Ac de unius solid' et undecim denar' annuatim exeun' ex Ballyvoige contin' un' carrucat' et dimid' terr'; ac de un' solid' et undecim denar' ster' annuatim exeun' ex lez du' Raleighs contin' un' carrucat' et dimid' un' carrucat' terr'; ac de un' solid' ster' annuatim exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de lez duodecim carrucat' terr de' Scull. Et ulterius jur' pred' dic' quod predict' Daniel Mac Carthy Reogh seisit' fuit de feodo de annual' reddit' decim' libr' decim' solid' et undecim denar' ster' exeun' ex cantred' de Collybegg, viz. Slught-Fahy contin' septem carrucat' terr' viz. de quindecim solid' ster' annuatim exeun' ex Eynane contin' un' carrucat' terr', ac etiam de septem solid' et sex denar' annuatim exeun' ex Torcke contin' dimid' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac de septem solid' et sex denar' ster' annuatim exeun' ex Poulnycally contin' dimid' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac de quindecim solid' ster' annuatim exeun' ex Rynenysynnagh et Currybegg contin' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac de quindecim solid' annuatim exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de lez du' carrucat' terr' de Innyshyduskots. Ac de quindecim solid' {} Stironekineali contin' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac de duodecim solid' ster' annuatim exeun' ex Nowcnockbane contin' un' carrucat terr'. Ac de sex solid' ster' annuatim ex {} carrucat' terr'. Ac ex Slaghtgort {}gh contin' tresdecim carrucat' et tres gneeves terr', viz. de et in xi.s 269 ster' annuatim exeun' ex Farrenustra et Connymurr contin' un' carruc,' et de sex solid' et sex denar' annuatim exeun' ex Killnymanavane contin' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac de sex solid' et sex denar' ster' annuatim exeun' ex Kintareloghly {} Ac de septem solid' et quatuor denar' ster' annuatim exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' de lez trib' carrucat' terr' de Knockycullen, ac de quatuor solid' et sex denar' {} Ohinlagh contin' dimid' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac de tribus solid' et sex denar' ster' annuatim exeun' ex Rakryne contin' dimid' unius carrucat' terr'. Ac de novem solid' {} ex Gurtynernoe et Lettirskanullane contin' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac de septem solid' ster' annuatim exeun' ex Rynemorogh contin' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac de quatuor solid' ster' annuatim exeun' ex Moncnocnycloghe contin' dimid' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac de novem solid' et trib' denar' ster' annuatim exeun' ex lez duob' Moantryes contin' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac de septem solid' annuatim exeun' ex Carrowmanagh contin' novem gneeves terr'. Ac de duobus  p.117 solid' ster' annuatim exeun' ex Lessyneyghtragh contin' tres gneeves terr'. Ac de {} et sex denar' ster' annuatim exeun' ex tribus gneeves terr' de Innyskaine. Et ulterius jur' predic' dicunt quod predictus Daniel Mac Carty Reogh seisit' fuit de feodo de quinque libr' sex solid' et dua' tert' part' unius drachme ster' exeun' ex cantred' de Clanecahill, viz. de quinque solid' duobus denar' et un' quadran' {} porc' anglice, “a poundage hogg,” ex quolibet grege porc' anglice “herd of swyne” ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc', tunc pro quolibet porco un' terc' part' unius drachme annuatim exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' trium carrucat' terr' de Castledonnyvane. Ac de quinque solid' duobus denar' et un' quadr' et un' custum porc' anglice, [a poundage hogg,] porc', ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc', et si non precellit numerum quinque porcor' tunc pro quolibet porco un' terc' part' unius drachme annuatim exeun' ex qualibet carrucat terr' {} Carrowkeale. Ac etiam de quinque solid', duobus denar', et un' qr. ster', annuatim exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' trium carrucat' terr' de Dromneosta, Knockane, et Garrane {} “a poundage hogg,” ex quolibet grege porc', ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc', aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco. Ac de quinque solid' duobus denar' et {} et un' custum porc' ex quolibet grege porc', ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc', aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco. Ac de quinque solid' duobus denar' et {} et un' custum porc' ex quolibet grege porc' ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc', aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco annuatim exeun' ex {} carrucat' terr', trium carrucat' terr' de Shronenycarton, Dirrygrea et Lahirtyshane. Ac de septem solid' et quatuor' denar' ster' annuatim exeun' ex Curraghylicky contin' tres carrucat' terr', ac de du' solid' quinque denar' et un' quadran' ster' annuatim exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de lez tribus carrucat' terr' de Twa Mac Dermody. Ac de quinque solid' et un' denar' {} ex Dromnalieagh cont' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac de duobus solid' et tribus denar' ster' annuatim exeun' ex qualibet carruc' terr' de lez tribus carrucat terr' de Ryne et Mantey {} et in septemdecim solid' et undecim denar' ster' et un' custum porc' ex quolibet grege porc' ita quod precellit  p.118 numerum quinque porc', aliter un' terc' part' unius, drachme {} annuatim exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' duar' carrucat' terr' de Gortbracke Bally-Mac Adame et Ballycahane. Ac de novem solid' et novem denar' ster. (un' quadran' inde except') et un' custum' porc' ex quolibet grege porc' ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc', aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco annuatim exeun' {} et Byallnygearigh contin' un' carruc' terr'. Ac de novem solid' et novem denar' ster' (un' quadran' ster' inde except') annuatim exeun' ex lez dimid' carrucat' terr' {} dimid' carrucat' terr' de Drissanyne. Ac de undecim solid' et octo denar' ster' annuatim exeun' ex Killcaugell contin' du' carrucat' terr'. Ac de Sleughtrandell contin' {} viz. de tresdecim et undecim ster. et un' custum' porc' ex quolibet grege porcor' ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc' aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme {} quolibet porco annuatim exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de les tribus carrucat' terr' de Drissane. Ac de novem solid' et octo deuar' ster' annuatim exeun' ex qualibet {} tribus carrucat' et dimid' terr' de Gortnyscryny. Ac de Clanne-Enesles contin' sex carrucat' et dimid' unius carr' terr' viz. de et in decem solid' et novem denar' ster. et un' {} ex quolibet grege porc' ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc' aliter un' terc' parte unius drachme pro quolibet porco annuatim exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de lez {} Ac etiam de quindecim solid' duobus denar' et un' ob' ster' annuatim exeun' ex le Mayny contin' un' carruc' terr' unacum un' custum porc' annuatim ex quolibet grege porc' ita quod precellit numerum quinque porcor' aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco. Ac de tresdecem solid' et duobus denar' ster' et un' custum' porc' ex quolibet {} precellit numerum quinque porc' aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco annuatim exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de lez du' carrucat' terr' de Killskonhonoughty et Dirry. {} de annual' reddit quindecim solid' ster' et un custum porc' ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc' aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme {} porco exeun' ex Dirryclohagh-Ightragh contin' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac de annual' reddit' quatuor solid' et quatuor denar' ster' et un' custum porc' ex quolibet  p.119 grege {} numerum quinque porc' aliter un' tertia' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco exeun' ex Ballynygornigh contin' dimid' unius carrucat' terr'. Ac de annual' reddit' novem solid' et {} ster' exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de lez septem carruc' terr' de Clainekenely. Ac de annual' reddit' duor' solid' quatuor denar' et unius terc' partis drachme ster' {} ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de lez tribus carrucat' terr' de Aghygardy. Ac de annual' reddit' duor' solid' et un' tertie partis unius drachme exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' {} carruc' terr' de Carrigulihy. Ac de annual' reddit' decem solid' octo denar' et unius quadran' ster' exeun' ex qualibet carruc' terr' de lez tribus carrucat' terr' de {} Ac de quodam annual' reddit' exeun' ex Slught-Ea contin' sex carruc' viz. de annual' reddit' novem solid' et undecim denar' ster' exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de lez duab' carrucat' Ballencally. Ac de annual' reddit' quindecim solid' et duor' denar' ster' exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de lez duabus carrucat' terr' de Cahirgall et Ardra. Ac de annual' reddit' {} quatuor denar' ster' et un' custum porc' ex quolibet grege porc' ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc' aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porc' exeun' {} carrucat' terr' de lez duabus carrucat' terr' de Ballynytony, Cuoscronyne, Myadill, et Favighiloghy. Et ulterius jur' pred' dic' quod pred' Daniel Mac Carty Reogh seisit' fuit de feodo de annual' reddit' vigint' un' libr' un' solid' novem denar' et un' quadran' exeun' ex cantred' de Clanloghlen. Ac de annual' reddit' quindecim solid' et quatuor denar' ster' {} (anglice a smulkin ster' inde except') et un' custum porc' ex quolibet grege porc' ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc' aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet {} ex qualibet carruc' terr' de lez quatuor carrucat' terr' de Cappynobohy, Keamemore, Banfune, et Ballenloghy. Ac de annual' reddit' decem solid' decem denar' et un' quadr' {} porc' ex quolibet grege porc' ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc' aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de lez {} qualibet terr' de Slught-Ivrine. [Slicht Imhair]. Ac de annual' reddit' quindecim solid' unius denar' et un' ob' ster. et un' custum porc' ex quolibet grege porc' ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc' aliter  p.120 {} drachme pro quolibet porco exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de lez du' carruc' terr' de Cullane. Ac de annual' reddit' duar' solid' et duar' tert' part' unius drachme exeun' ex Cullanekilly contin' dimid' unius carrucat' terr'. Ac de annual' reddit' septem solid' septem denar' et un' ob' ster' et un' custum porc' ex quolibet grege ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc' aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco exeun' ex Ballynygorenagh contin' dimid' un' carrucat'. Ac de annual' reddit' {} solid' et quinque denar' et dimid' unius quadran' ster' et un' custum' porc' ex quolibet grege porc' ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc' aliter un' terr' part' unius {} pro quolibet porco exeun' ex Criggantra contin' dimid' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac de annual' reddit decem solid' decem denar' et un' quadran' et un' custum' porc' et quolibet grege porc' ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc' aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' de lez du' carrucat' terr' de {} de annual' reddit' decem solid' decem denar' et un' quadran' ster' et un' custum' porc' ex quolibet grege porc' ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc' aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco exeun' ex qualibet carruc' terr' de lez septem carruc' terr' de Twomealye. Ac de annual' reddit' decem solid' decem denar' et un' quadran' ster' et un' custum porc' ex quolibet grege porc' ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc' aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de lez tribus carrucat' terr' de {} Ac de quinque solid' quinque denar' et dimid' unius quadr' et un' custum porc' ex quolibet grege porc' ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc' aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco exeun' ex Killincally contin' dimid' un' carruc' terr'. Ac de quinque solid' quinque denar' et dimid' unius quadran' ster' et un' custum porc' ex quolibet grege porc' ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc' aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco exeun' ex Killbegg contin' dimid' unius carrucat' terr'. Ac de annual' reddit' decem solid' decem denar' et un' quadran' ster' et un' custum porc' ex quolibet grege porc' ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc' aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de lez du' carrucat' terr' de Dromuullihy. Ac de annual' reddit' decem solid' decem denar'  p.121 et un' quadr' exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de lez quarter' de Aghytubrid. Ac de annual' reddit' decem solid' decem denar' et un' quadr' exeun' ex Maulemoryne et Carrigglosky contin' un' carrucat' terr'. Et ulterius jur' pred' dicunt quod pred' Daniel Mac Carty seisit' fuit de feod' de libr' decem solid' ster' exeun' ex cantred' de Glane-Icryme. Et ulterius jur' pred' dic' quod pred' Daniel Mac Carty Reogh seisit' fuit de feodo de octo libr' sex solid' et octo denar' ster' exeun' ex cantred' de Glann-Ivoollen expectan' post mortem Honore Carty avuncule sue viz. ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de lez quinque carrucat' {} revercione annual' reddit' vigint' solid' ster' exeunt' ex Letter contin' un' carrucat terr'. Ac de reversione annual' reddit' viginti solid' ster' exeun' ex Cahirr-Iconway contin' un carrucat' terr'. Ac de reversione annual' reddit' viginti solid' ster' exeun' ex Rossmore contin' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac de reversione annual' reddit' viginti solid' exeun' ex Currny Comnerty {} de reversione annual' reddit' vigint' solid' ster' exeun' ex West Lissybriny contin' un' carruc' terr' unacum un' custum porc' ex quolibet grege {} precellit numerum quinque porc aliter un' terc part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco annuatim exeun' ex pred' quinque carrucat' terr' ultim' recitat'. Ac de reversione cujusdam annual' reddit' exeun' ex alter' quinque carruc' terr' de Glane-Ivoolen pred' viz. de reversione annual' reddit' tresdecem solid', et quatuor denar' ster' exeun', ex Cnocken contin' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac etiam {} annual' reddit' tresdecem solid' et quatuor denar' ster' exeun' ex Killmyne contin' un' carruc' terr'. Ac de reversione annual' reddit' tresdecem solid' et quatuor denar' ster' exeun' ex Lis {} Ac de annual' reversione reddit' tresdecem solid' et quatuor denar' ster' exeun' ex East Lissybrenny contin' un' carruc' terr'. Ac de reversione annual' reddit' ster' tresdecem solid' {} exeun' ex Cnockduffe contin' un' carruc' terr'. Et ulterius Jur' pred' dic' quod pred' Daniell Mac Carty seisit' fuit de feodo de annual' reddit' triu' libr' et novem solid' ster' exeun' ex lez tribus carrucat' terr' de Twovintirrydorcke. Et ulterius pred' jur' dic' quod pred' Daniel Mac Carty Reogh seisit' fuit de feod' de quodam annual' reddit' exeun' ex vill' et terr' sequen' vizt. de annual' reddit' vigint' duor' solid' et duor' denar' terc' part' unius drachme exeun' ex Ballyclohy, contin' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac de annual' reddit' sex solid' et octo denar' ster' exeun' ex  p.122 Cahirbeg contin' un' carruc' terr'. Ac de annual' reddit' vigint' sex solid' et octo denar' ster' exeun' ex Killmurrow contin' du' carruc' terr'. Ac de annual' reddit' tresdecem solid' et quatuor denar' ster' exeun' ex Arden contin' tres carruc' terr'. Ac de et in annual' reddit' quatuor solid' et sex denar' ster' exeun' ex Clonecallybeg contin' dimid' unius carrucat terr'. Ac de annual' reddit' sex solid' et octo denar' ster', exeun' ex Currycrolly contin' un' carruc' et dimid' unius carruc' terr'. Et ulterius Jur' pred' dic' quod' pred' Daniel Mac Carty Reogh, seisit' fuit de annual' reddit' vigint' du' solid' duor' denar' et du' quadrar' ster' exeun' ex Slughtowen contin' sex carrucat' terr'. Et ulterius Jur' pred' dic' quod' pred' Daniel Mac Carty Reogh seisit' fuit de feodo de annual' reddit' quindecem solid' et septem denar' ster' exeun' ex vill' et terr' sequen' vizt. de annual' reddit' du' solid' un' denar' et du' quadran' ster' exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de lez tribus carrucat' terr' de Killgarruffe. Ac de annual' reddit' un' solid' du' denar' et du' quadran' exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de lez duabus carrucat' terr' de le Yoaghilly. Ac de annual' reddit' un' solid' du' denar' et du' quadran' exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de lez dic' carrucat' terr' de Billiragh. Ac de annual' reddit' un' solid' du' denar' et du' quad' exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de Clossyfry et Ballynlangy contin' un' carrucat' et dimid' unius carrucat' terr'. Ac de annual' reddit' un' solid' du' denar' et un' quadran' exeun' ex qualibet terr' de Rathdrought et Killynitty. Ac de annual' reddit' decem denar' et unius ob' ster' exeun' ex Ballenvullane contin' novem gneeves terr'. Et ulterius Jur' pred' dic' quod pred' Daniel MacCarty Reogh seisit' fuit de feodo de annual' reddit' viginti septem libr' duodecim solid' ster' exeun' ex toto cantred' de Collymore, vizt. de annual' reddit' septem solid' et quatuor denar' ster' exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de lez tribus carrucat' terr' de Ryndacossane. Ac de annual' reddit' septem solid' et quatuor denar' ster' exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de lez tribus carrucat' terr' de Drissanemore et etiam de annual' reddit' septem solid' et quatuor denar' ster' exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de lez tribus carrucat' terr' de Munagh et Gortard. Ac de annual' reddit' quinque solid' et sex denar' ster' exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de lez du' carrucat' terr' de Shanacourte. Ac de annual' reddit' du' solid' novem denar' et un' quadr' ster' exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de  p.123 lez tribus carrucat' terr' de Cregh. Ac de annual' reddit' undecim solid' ster' exeun' ex Lackaghane contin' un' carrucat terr'. Ac de annual' reddit' undecim solid' ster' exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de lez du' carrucat' terr' de Ardagh. Ac de annual' reddit' septem solid' et quatuor denar' ster' exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de lez tribus carrucat' de Ballinard. Ac de annual' reddit' quinque solid' ster' exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de lez du' carrucat' terr' de Glanevickfoen. Ac de annual' reddit' du' solid' novem denar' et un' quad' exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' [de] lez tribus carrucat' terr' de Ballymacerewane. Ac de annual' reddit' septem solid' et quatuor denar' ster' exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de Rathmore. Ac de annual' reddit' decem solid' et octo denar' ster' exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de lez tribus carrucat' terr' de Ballylenshaghane. Ac de annual' reddit' octo solid' ster' [ex] lez tribus carrucat' terr' de Downeshead alias Baltymore. Ac de annual' reddit' septem solid' ster' exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de lez du' carrucat' terr' de Downegall. Ac de annual' reddit' novem' decem solid' et octo denar' ster' de lez du' carrucat' terr' de Rynegcroggie. Ac de annual' reddit' septem solid' et quatuor denar' ster' exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' Farrencouse contin' un' carrucat' et dimid' unius carrucat' terr'. Ac de annual' reddit' septem solid' et quatuor denar' ster' exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de lez tribus carrucat' terr' de Lacklea. Ac de annual' reddit' septem solid' et quatuor denar' ster' exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de lez tribus carrucat' terr' de Sleavemore. Ac de annual' reddit' undecim solid' ster' exeun' ex Killwoony contin' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac de annual' reddit' trium solid' ster' exeun' ex Rynedrollane contin' dimid' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac de septem decim solid' et sex denar' ster' exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de Insula de Cleere pred'. Et ulterius Jur' pred' dic' quod' pred' Daniel MacCarty alias MacCarty Reogh seisit' fuit de feodo de annual' reddit' septem libr' un' solid' un' denar' et un' quadran' ster' exeun' ex omnibus terr' de cantred' de Clanteige-Eillen, vizt. de annual' reddit' sex decem solid' et trium denar' ster' exeun' ex Curry-MacTeige contin' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac de annual' reddit' sex decem solid' et trium denar' ster' exeun' ex Lyssynoohigg contin' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac de annual' reddit' sex decem solid' et trium denar' ster. exeun' ex Skeagh et Durrindangen contin' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac de annual' reddit' sexdecem solid' et  p.124 trium' denar' ster' exeun' ex Cloghbwoly contin' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac etiam de annual' reddit' sexdecem solid' et trium denar' ster' exeun' ex Cowreneiller contin' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac de annual' reddit' sex decem solid' et trium denar' ster' exeun' ex Corrawne contin' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac de annual' reddit' sex decem solid' et trium denar' ster' exeun' ex Gortnemocklagh et Dromeinagh contin' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac de annual' reddit' sex decem solid' et trium denar' ster' exeun' ex Drommegg contin' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac de annual' reddit' sex decem solid' et trium denar' ster' exeun' ex Kilnegosbagh et Lassanaree contin' un' carrucat'. Ac de annual' reddit' sexdecem solid' et trium denar' ster' exeun' ex Kilnecloshie contin' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac de annual' reddit' sexdecem solid' et trium denar' ster' exeun' ex Lahirtidally et Maulybrock contin' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac de annual' reddit' sexdecem solid' et trium denar' ster' exeun' ex Dromrahimurelly et Tworinesillane contin' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac de annual' reddit' sexdecem solid' et trium denar' ster' exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de lez du' carrucat' terr' de Curronea. Ac de annual' reddit' sex decem solid' et trium denar' ster. exeun' ex Glanegyle contin' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac de annual' reddit' sexdecem solid' et trium denar' ster' exeun' ex Farrenmacgullymichill contin' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac de annual' reddit' sexdecem solid' et trium denar' ster' exeun' ex Blwod contin' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac de annual' reddit' sex decem solid' et trium denar' ster' exeun' ex Reagh contin' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac de annual' reddit' sex decem solid' et trium denar' ster' exeun' ex Banenecollapel et Byalleknowrane contin' un' carrucat terr'. Ac de annual' reddit' sexdecem' solid' et trium denar' ster' exeun' ex Lurgo et Coolnegarrane contin' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac de un' custum porc' ex quolibet grege porc' ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc' et si non precellit numerum quinque porc' tunc un' terc' pt' unius drachme ster' pro quolibet porco annuatim exeun' ex septem decem carrucat' terr' de pred' cantred' Clanteige Eillen. Et ulterius Jur' pred' dic' quod pred' Daniel Mac Carty alias Mac Carty Reogh seisit' fuit de feodo de annual' reddit' quatuor libr' novem decem solid' et un' terc' pt' unius drachme ster' exeun' ex cantred' de Clanteige Roe [Clann Táidhg Ruaidh na Sgairte] vizt. de annual' reddit' quinque solid' et sex denar' ster' exeun' ex  p.125 qualibet carrucat' terr' de lez tribus carrucat' terr' de Skarte. Ac de annual' reddit' quinque solid' et sex denar' ster' exeun' ex quolibet carrucat' terr' de lez tribus carrucat' terr' de Collomane unacum un' custum' porc' annuatim exeun' ex quolibet grege porc', ita quod' precellit numerum quinque porc' aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme ster' pro quolibet porco. Ac de annual' reddit' quinque solid' et sex denar' ster. et un' custum porc' ex qualibet grege porc' ita quod' precellit numerum quinque porc' aliter un' terc' part' unius' drachme pro quolibet porco exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de lez tribus carrucat' terr' de Dromore. Ac de annual' reddit' quinque solid' et sex denar' ster' exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de lez tribus carrucat' terr' de Letterlicky. Ac etiam de annual' reddit' quinque solid' et sex denar' ster' et un' custum' porc' ex quolibet grege porc' ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc', aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de lez sex carrucat' terr' de Caharagh. Et ulterius dic' quod pred' Daniel Mac Carty alias Mac Carty Reogh seisit' fuit de feodo de annual' reddit' septem libr' octo solid' et octo denar' ster exeun' ex cantred' de Slugtheige O'Mahowney, vizt. de quinque solid' et sex denar' ster' annuatim exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de lez tribus carrucat' terr' de Cullagh. Ac etiam de annual' reddit' quinque solid' et sex denar' ster' exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de lez tribus carrucat' terr' de Dromereogh et Dromeleary. Ac de annual' reddit' quinque solid' et sex denar' ster' exeun' ex Shanavoghtowrie contin' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac de annual' reddit' quinque solid' et sex denar' ster' exeun' ex Baneshanacloghie contin' un carrucat' terr'. Ac de annual' reddit' quinque solid' et sex denar' ster. exeun' ex Ardworye contin' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac de annual' reddit' quinque solid' et sex denar' ster' exeunt' ex Cowervickgullykeagh contin' un' carr' terr'. Ac de annual' reddit' quinque solid' et sex denar' ster' exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de lez tribus carrucat' terr' de Glannesillagh et Killcowsane. Ac de annual' reddit' quinque solid' et sex denar' ster' exeun' ex qualibet carrucat terr' de lez tribus carrucat' terr' de Corrycollaght et Faghane. Ac de annual' reddit' quinque solid' et sex denar' ster exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de lez tribus carrucat' terr' de Gorteenekilly. Ac de annual' reddit' quinque solid' et sex denar' ster' exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de lez tribus carrucat' terr' de Kippaghmore.  p.126 Ac de quinque solid' et sex denar' ster' exeun' ex Skartinecullen contin' un' carruc' terr'. Et ulterius Jur' pred' dic' quod pred' Daniel Mac Carty alias Mac Carty Reogh seisit' fuit de feodo de annual' reddit' viginti quatuor' libr' undecim solid' un' denar' et un' quadr' ster' exeun' ex cantred' de Clanedermody vizt. de annual' reddit' octo solid' et octo denar' ster' exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de lez du' carrucat' terr' de Killcogh. Ac de annual' reddit' octo solid' et octo denar' ster' exeun' ex Glannekillinagh contin' un' carruc' terr'. Ac de annual' reddit' quatuor solid' et quatuor denar' ster' exeun' ex Maghrahine contin' dimid' unius carrucat' terr'. Ac de annual' reddit' octo solid' et octo denar' exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de lez tribus carrucat' terr' de Lissyclary. Ac de annual' reddit' quatuor solid' et quatuor denar' ster' exeun' ex Maghrahane contin' dimid' unius carrucat' terr'. Ac de annual' reddit' undecim solid' et quatuor denar' ster' et un' custum' porc', ex quolibet grege porc' ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc' aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet carrucat' terr' de lez sex carrucat' terr' de Ballyowrane, Drome-Cwoarchie, et Clownecogher. Ac de annual' reddit' octo solid' et octo denar' ster' et un' custum' porc' ex quolibet grege porc' ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc', aliter' un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco exeun' ex qualibet carruc' terr' de lez tribus carrucat' terr' de Lissane. Ac de annual' reddit' octo solid' et octo denar' ster' et un' custum' porc' ex quolibet grege porc' ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc' aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco exeun' ex qualibet carruc' terr' de lez tribus carruc' terr' de Lissylogherrie. Ac de annual' reddit' octo solid' et octo denar' ster' et un' custum' porc' ex quolibet grege porc' ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc' aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de lez duabus carrucat' terr' de Cullenagh. Ac de octo solid' et octo denar' ster' et un' custum' porc' ex quolibet greg' porc', ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc' aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco annuatim exeun' ex Skrillane contin' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac de octo solid' et octo denar' ster' et un' custum' porc' ex quolibet grege porc' ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc' aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco annuatim exeun' ex Clonkeene contin' un carrucat' terr'. Ac de quatuor solid' et quatuor'  p.127 denar' ster' et un custum' porc' ex quolibet grege porc' ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc', aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco annuatim exeun' ex Glanetane contin' dimid' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac de quatuor solid' et quatuor denar' ster' et un' custom porc' ex quolibet grege porc' ita quod precellit numerum quinq' porc' aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco annuatim exeun' ex Mawletrihane contin' dimid' unius carrucat' terr'. Ac de octo solid' et octo denar' ster' et un' custum porc' ex quolibet grege porc' ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc' aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco annuatim exeun' ex Addergolle contin' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac de octo solid' et octo denar' ster' et un' custum' porc' ex quolibet grege porc' ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc' aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco annuatim exeun' ex Lettirrteubill —— contin' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac de octo solid' et octo denar' ster' et un' custum porc' ex quolibet grege porc', ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc' aliter un' terc' part unius drachme pro quolibet porco annuatim exeun' ex Smoorane contin' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac de octo solid' et octo denar' ster' et un' custum' porc' ex quolibet grege porc' ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc' aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco annuatim exeun', ex Dirryliegh contin' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac de quindecim solid' et un' denar' ster' et un' custum' porc' ex quolibet grege porc' ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc' aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco annuatim exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de lez tribus carrucat' terr' de Aghill. Ac de undecim solid' et quatuor denar' ster' et un' custum porc' ex quolibet grege porc', ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc', aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco annuatim exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de lez sex carruc' terr' de Barraghavilly. Et ulterius Jur' pred' dic' quod pred' Daniel Mac Carty alias Mac Carty Reogh seisit' fuit de feodo de annual' reddit' novem libr' quatuor solid' et quatuor denar' ster' ex cantred' de Killtallwoye, vizt. de novem solid' et undecim denar' ster' et un' custum' porc' ex quolibet grege porc', ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc' aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco annuatim exeun' ex Shanlaragh et Gortroe contin' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac de annual' reddit' novem solid' et undecim denar' ster' et un' custum' porc' ex  p.128 quolibet grege porc', ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc' aliter un' terc' part' unias drachme pro quolibet porco exeun' ex Altaghreogh contin' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac de novem solid' et undecim denar' ster' et un' custum' porc' ex quolibet grege porc' ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc', aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco annuatim exeun' ex Glanevelehequeyne contin' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac de quatuor solid' et undecim denar' ster' et un' custum' porc' ex quolibet grege porc', ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc', aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme, anglice a Bungall, pro quolibet porco annuatim exeun' ex Beghigullane contin' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac de novem solid' et undecim denar' ster' et un' custum' porc' ex quolibet grege porc', ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc', aliter terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco annuatim exeun' ex Aghekeery contin un' carrucat' terr'. Ac de novem solid' et undecim denar' ster' et un' custum porc' ex quolibet grege porc' ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc' aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco annuatim exeun' ex Currydrinagh contin' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac de novem solid' et undecim denar' ster' et un' custum' porc' ex quolibet grege porc', ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc', aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco annuatim exeun' ex Mallow contin' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac de novem solid' et undecim denar' ster' et un' custum' porc' ex quolibet grege porc', ita quod precellit numerum quinque porcor', aliter un' ter' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco annuatim exeun' ex Sannagh contin' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac de novem solid' et undecim denar' ster' et un' custum' porc', ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc', aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco annuatim exeun' ex Knockduffe et Dromercke contin' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac de novem solid' et undecim denar' ster' et un' custum' porc' ex quolibet grege porc' ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc' aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco annuatim exeun' ex Knockeaghaduffe contin' un' carrucat' terr". Ac de quinque solid' ster' un' custum porc' ex quolibet grege porc', ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc', aliter un' terc part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco annuatim exeun' ex Rossynny contin' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac de novem solid' et undecim denar' ster' et un' custum' porc' ex quolibet grege porc'. ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc', aliter  p.129 un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco annuatim exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de lez tribns carruc' terr' de Thome-Baltinbreake et Beahagh. Ac de novem solid' et undecim denar' ster' et un' custum' porc' ex quolibet grege porc' ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc' aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco annuatim exeun' ex Thyneagh contin' tres carrucat' terr'. Ac de duodecim solid' et quatuor denar' ster' et un' custum' porc' ex quolibet grege porc' ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc', aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco annuatim exeun' ex Cahir-Icrowly contin' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac de novem solid' et undecim denar' ster' et un' custum' porc' ex quolibet grege porc', ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc', aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco, annuatim exeun' ex Cannagh contin' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac de novem solid' et undecim solid' ster' et un' custum' porc' pro quolibet grege, ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc', aliter un' terc' par' unius drachme pro quolibet porco annuatim exeun' ex Kinmeaghbegg contin' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac de novem solid' et undecim denar' ster' et un' custum' porc' ex quolibet grege porc', ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc', aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco annuatim exeun' ex Dromticloghy contin' un' carrucat' terr'. Ac de quinque solid' ster' un' custum' porc' ex quolibet grege porc', ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc', aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco annuatim exeun' ex Liscronyne contin' dimid' unius carrucat' terr'. Ac etiam de et in septem decem mensur' aven' et aratione du' acr' ad vel ante ultim' diem Martii annuatim exeun' ex separal' terr' in cantred' de Killtallwoye pred'. Et ulterius Jur' pred' dic' quod pred' Daniel Mac Carty alias Mac Carty Reogh seisit' fuit de feodo de annual' reddit' trium libr' quinque solid' et un' quadr' ster' exeun' ex cantred' de Slught Cormacknykelly vizt. de quatuor solid' et octo denar' ster' et un' custum' porc' ex quolibet grege porc', ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc', aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco annuatim exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de lez du' carruc' terr' de Darragrae. Ac etiam de quatuor solid' et octo denar' ster' et un' custum' porc' ex quolibet grege porc', ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc', aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco annuatim exeun' ex Ardkilline contin' un' carruc' terr'. Ac de septem solid' ster' et un'  p.130 custum' porc' ex quolibet grege porc', ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc', aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco annuatim exeun' de Clonayregge contin' un' carruc' et dimid' un' carruc' terr'. Ac de septem solid' ster' et un' custum' porc' ex quolibet grege porc', ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc', aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco animatim exeun' ex Aghilenane contin' un' carruc' et dimid' un' carruc' terr'. Ac de quatuor solid' et octo denar' ster' et un' custum' porc' ex quolibet [grege] porc' annuatim exeun' ita quod precellit numerum quinque aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco annuatim exeun' ex Ballaghymure et Farrensleynoigg contin' un' carruc' terr'; ac etiam de quatuor solid' et octo denar' ster' et un' custum' porc' ex quolibet grege porc', ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc', aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco annuatim exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de lez du' carruc' terr' de Addryvall. Ac de quatuor solid' et octo denar' ster' et un' custum' porc' pro quolibet grege porc' ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc' aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco annuatim exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de lez du' carruc' terr' de Liscurrane Ballywillene-oughter. Ac de quatuor solid' et octo denar' ster' et un custum' porc' ex quolibet grege porc', ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc', aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco annuatim exeun' ex Ballywillon-eightragh contin' un' carr' terr' ac etiam de quatuor solid' et octo denar' ster' et un' custum' porc', ex quolibet grege porc', ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc' aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco annuatim exeun' ex Cappine contin' un' carr' terr.' Ac de quatuor mensur' et dimid' unius mensur' aven' et aratione un' acr' terr' mensur' Stibnie ad vel ante ultim' die' Martii annuatim exeun' de separal' terr' pred' cantred' de Slught-Cormackny-Kelly pred. Et ulterius Jur' pred' dic' quod predic' Daniel Mac Carty alias Mac Carty Reogh seitsit' fuit de feod' de annual' reddit' quatuor libr' novem solid' et sex denar' ster' exeun' ex cantred' de Slught Corky vizt. de vigint' duor' solid' et quinque denar' ster' et un' custum' porc' ex quolibet grege porc' ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc', aliter un' terc' part' unius [drachme] pro quolibet porco annuatim exeun' ex Ardkeaghan contin' un' carruc' et dimid' unius carruc' terr', ac de vigint' du' solid' et quinque denar' ster' et un' custum  p.131 porc' ex quolibet grege porc', ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc', aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porc' annuatim exeun' ex Killcaskane et Bodderymyne contin' un' carruc' et dimid' unius carruc' terr'; ac de quadraginta et quatuor solid' et decem denar' ster' et un' custum' porc' ex quolibet grege porc', ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc', aliter un' terc' part' un' drachme pro quolibet porc' annuatim exeun' ex lez tribus carruc' terr' de Eaddencurry et Insifnen. Ac de octo mensur' et dimid' unius mensur' aven' et aratione un' acr' terr' mensur' Stibnie ad vel ante ultim' die' Martii, annuatim exeun' ex cantred' de Slught Corcky pred'. Et ulterius Jur' pred' super sacram' su' pred' dic' quod pred' Daniel Mac Carty alias Mac Carty Reogh seitsit' fuit de feodo de annual' reddit' sexdecim libr' quinque solid' et octo denar' ster' exeun' ex cantred' de Clanecromyne vizt. de duodecim solid' et du' terc' partibus unius drachme ster' et un' custum' porc' ex quolibet grege porc', ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc', aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco annuatim exeun' ex qualibet carruc' terr' de lez tribus carruc' terr' de Mansie. Ac de duodecim solid' et du' terc' partibus unius drachme et un' custum porc' ex quolibet grege porc', ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc' aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco annuatim exeun' ex qualibet carr' terr' de lez tribus carrucat terr' de Grillagh. Ac de duodecim solid' et du' terc' part' unius drachme ster' et un' custum' porc' ex quolibet grege porc' ita quod precellit numer' quinque porc', aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porc' annuatim exeun' ex qualibet carruc' terr' de lez tribus carruc' terr' de Ballyvoig'; ac de duodecim solid' et tribus denar' et un' custum' porc' ex quolibet grege porc', ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc', aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme [pro quolibet] porco annuatim exeun' ex Knockycullen contin' un' carruc' terr' ac de quinque solid' ster' annuatim exeun' de Knockycullen contin' dimid' un' carruc' terr.' Ac de decem solid' ster' annuatim exeun' ex qualibet carruc' terr' de lez tribus carruc' terr' de Dromlegagh; ac de decem solid' ster' annuatim exeun' ex Killmeallcrane contin' un' carruc' terr'; ac de quinque solid' ster' annuatim exeun' ex Sullagh contin' dimid' unius carruc' terr' ac etiam de annual' reddit' duodecim solid' quatuor denar' et un' ob' ster' et un' custum' porc' ex quolibet grege porc', ita quod precellit numerum quinque  p.132 porc' aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco et aratione un' acr' terr' mensur' Stibie ad vel ante ultim' diem Martii exeun' ex qualibet carruc' terr' de lez quatuor carruc' terr' de Kildy. Ac de vigint' solid' du' denar' et un' quadr' ster' et un' custum' porc' ex quolibet grege porc', ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc', aliter un' terc' part unius drachme pro quolibet porco, et aratione trium partium in quatuor part' dividend' un' acr' terr' mensur' Stibnie ad vel ante ultim' diem Martii annuatim exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de lez tribus carr' terr' de Carrowalder, ac de duodecim solid' ster' et un' custum' porc' ex quolibet grege porc', ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc', aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco et aratione un' stang' et dimid' un' stang' terr' ad vel ante ultim' diem Martii annuatim exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de Knocke contin' un' carruc' et dimid' un' carruc' terr'; ac de duodecim solid' ster' et un' custum' porc', ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc', aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco et aratione et unius stang' et dimid' un' stang' terr' ante ultim' diem Martii annuatim exeun' ex qualibet carruc' terr' de Ballynard contin' un' carruc' et dimid' unius carruc' terr'; ac de sexdecim solid' et du' denar' ster' annuatim exeun' ex Dromgarruffe contin' un' carruc' et dimid' terr'. Ac de quatuordecim solid' et octo denar' ster' annuatim exeun' ex Carrigfunevoy et Maddany contin' un' carr' et dimid' terr'. Ac de octo solid' et un' denar' ster' annuatim exeun' ex Beallynorougher contin' un' carruc' terr'; ac de octo solid' et un' denar' ster' annuatim exeun' ex Kilcoursie contin' un' carruc' terr'. Et ulterius Jur' pred' dic' quod pred' Daniel Carty alias Mac Carty Reogh, seisit' fuit de feodo de annual' reddit' septem libr' trium solid' et trium denar' ster' exeun' ex cantred' de Claneshane vizt. de vigint' sex solid' ster' et un' custum' porc' ex quolibet grege porc' ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc' aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco annuatim exeun' ex Maulebrack contin' un' carruc' terr' ac de trigint' solid' et novem denar' ster' et un' custum' porc' ex quolibet grege porc', ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc' aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco annuatim ex Kilrushigarvy Bollynagh et Knockoole contin' un' carruc' dimid' unius carruc' terr'. Ac de vigint' solid' sex denar' ster' et un' custum' porc' ex quolibet grege porc', ita quod precellit numerum  p.133 quinque porc', aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porco ex qualibet carruc' terr' de lez du' carruc' terr' de Agheyoughelly, Garranleighan, Knocknenosse, et Kiltubredolly. Ac de vigint' solid' et sex denar' ster' et un' custum' porc' ex quolibet grege porc', ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc' aliter' un' terc' part' unius pro quolibet porc' annuatim exeun' ex qualibet carrucat' terr' de Carrigruoe, Durryhynane, et Knocknestocky contin' un' carruc' et dimid' unius carr' terr'. Ac de vigint' solid' et sex denar' ster' et un' custum' porc' ex quolibet grege porc', ita quod precellit numerum quinque porc', aliter un' terc' part' unius drachme pro quolibet porc' annuatim exeun' ex Briaghnyagh contin' un' carruc' terr'. Et ulterius Jur' pred' dic' quod pred' Daniel Mac Carty alias Mac Carty Reogh seitsit' fuit de feodo de quatuor annual' reddit' exeun' ex cantred' de Slught-Donogh vizt. de octo solid' ster' annnatim exeun' ex Ballinuroingge contin' un' carruc' terr'. Ac de octo solid' ster' annuatim exeun' ex Corrowrane contin' un' carruc' terr'. Ac de octo solid' ster' annuatim exeun' ex Ballygonossie et Glaneverane. Ac de quatuor solid' annuatim exeun' ex Sleavine contin' dimid' unius carruc' terr'. Et Jur' pred' dic' quod pred' Daniel Mac Carty alias Mac Carty Reogh seitsit' fuit de feodo de annual' reddit' quinquagint' et septem solid' et novem denar' ster' exeun' ex terr' de Tuoghmontyne, vizt. de octo solid' et undecim denar' ster' annuatim exeun' ex Mountyne et Killmolody contin' un' carruc' terr'; ac de octo solid' et undecim denar' ster', annuatim exeun' ex Reangaragine contin' un' carruc' terr' ac de quatuor solid' quinque denar' et un' ob' ster' annuatim exeun' ex occidental' dimid' carruc' terr' de Skeoff. Ac de quatuor solid' quinque denar' et un' ob' ster annuatim exeun' ex Gloggaghreogh contin' dimid' unius carruc' terr'. Ac de octo solid' et undecim denar' ster' annuatim exeun' ex qualibet carruc' terr' de lez du' carruc' terr' de Aghilosky. Ac de octo solid' et undecim denar' ster' annuatim exeun' ex qualibet carruc' terr' de Maulrawer, Farrenemrenagh et Slogidder, contin' un' carruc' et dimid' unius carr' terr'. Et ulterius Jur' pred' dic' quod pred' Daniel Mac Carty alias Mac Carty Reogh seitsit' existens de omnibus premiss' pred' ut predict' obiit sic inde seitsit' primo die Augusti anno domini 1636. Et quod Cormuck Mac Carty est ejus fil' et heres et quod fuit etat' sexdecim annorum tempore mort' patris' sui pred' et maritat'.  p.134 Et ulterius Jur' pred' dic' quod omnia premiss' pred' tenent' de dicto domino rege nunc Carolo in capite per servic' mil'. Et ulterius Jur' pred' dic' quod pred' Daniel Mac Carty alias Mac Carty Reogh obiit seitsit' de null' al' reddit' exeun' ex terr' pred' preterquam reddit' prementionat' et quod reddit' pred' solubil' sunt ad dua festa in anno viz. ⁊c. Et quod pred' Ellena Roche alias Carty et Ellinora Carty in plen' vit' exist'. Et ulterius Jur' pred' dic' quod pred' Daniel Mac Carty in vita sua per indentur' suam dat' primo die Februar' anno domini 1629 divisit Willmo' Mac Carty' execut' ⁊c. suis vill' et terr' de Knocknockiffiny et Tralong contin' du' carruc' terr' pro term' viginti et unius annor' sub annual' reddit' vigint' et quatuor libr' ster' prout per indentur' plen' apparet. Et ulterius Jur' pred' dic' quod pred' Daniel Mac Carty unacum Teige Mac Cormuck Carty de Castlemore in dicto com' gen', David Nagle de Monianguny gen', Cahir O'Callaghane of Dromynyne gen', et Johanne Roch de Ballidwill gen', per fact' eorum dat' vicesimo die Octobr' anno domini 1624, feoffaver' Teige Oge Crowley de Skeaffe in' dicto com' gen' hered' ⁊c. suos de vill' et terr' de Ballycattyn et Skeaffe contin' un' carruc' et dimid' unius carruc' terr' in morgag' sub conditione redemptions prout' per pred' fact plen' apparet. Et ulterius Jur' pred' dic' quod pred' Daniel Mac Carty, Teige Mac Cormuck Carty, David Nagle, Cahir O'Callaghan et Johannes Roche per indentur' dat' octavo die Octobr' anno domini 1624 dimiser' premiss' pred' de Ballycattyne et Skeaffe cuid' Florenc' Mac Teige Crowley nuper de Skeaffe execut', ⁊c. suis pro termino trigint' et unius annor'. Et ulterius Jur' pred' dic' quod pred' Daniel Mac Carty per indentur' suam dat' decimo octavo die Februar' 1629 dimis' cuid' Fynine Mac Daniell Mac Owen Mac Carty nuper de Drishane in dicto com' gen', execut' ⁊c. suis lez tres gneeves de Killydery, un' gneeve terr' de Gurt {} du' gneeves de Blooyd pro termino trigint' et un' ann' sub annual' reddit' sex libr' ster'. Et ulterius Jur' pred' dic' quod pred' Daniel Mac Carty, Ellen' uxor ejus, Teige Mac Cormack Carty, Cahir O'Callaghane, David Nagle et Johannes Roche, per indentur' eor' dat' vicesimo {} anno domini 1624 dimiser' cuid' Teige Mac Dermod O'Conba de Ballyrishine in' dicto com' yeom' execut' ⁊c. suis vill' et terr' de Burryn contin' un' carruc' terr' pro termino trigint' et un' annor' sub  p.135 annual' reddit' trigint' libr'. Et ulterius Jur' pred' dic' quod {} Mac Carty, Teige Mac Cormucke Carty, Cahir O'Callaghane, David Nagle et Eduardus Roche, per indentur' eor' geren' dat' decimo die Maii anno domini 1634 dimiser' le dimid' carruc' terr' cuid' Con Mac Cahir de Garranbegg in dicto com' gen' execut' ⁊c. suis pro termino vigint' et unius annor' sub annual' reddit' octo libr'. Et ulterius Jur' pred' dic' quod pred' Daniel Mac Carty per quosdam articulos agreament' dat' duodecimo die Novembr' anno domini 1634. dimisit oriental' carruc' terr' de Ratharrowne quibusdam, Dermod' Mac Owen Hurley et Cnogher Mac Owen Hurley execut' ⁊c. suis pro termino vigint' et un' ann' sub annual' reddit' duodecim libr' et decem solid'. Et ulterius Jur' pred' dic' quod pred' Daniel Mac Carty per indentur' suam dat' decimo quarto die Januar' anno domini 1626 dimisit lez tres gneeves terr' de Ballymore et le dimid' carruc' terr' de Carriggynigary, Daniel Oge Hurly gen', execut' ⁊c. suis pro termino vigint' et un' ann' sub annual' reddit' duodecim libr' ster'. Et ulterius Jur' pred' dic' quod pred' Daniel Mac Carty, per indentur' suam dat' decimo tertio die Octobr' anno domini 1630, dimisit cuid' Morrogh Mac Shihy de Cnocknygappull execut' ⁊c. suis le carrucat' terr' de Cnocknygappull pred' pro termino vigint' annor' sub annual' reddit' viginti libr' ster'. Et ulterius dic' quod pred' Daniel Mac Carty, per quosdam articulos agreament' dat' vicesimo secun' die Novembr' anno domini 1631, dimisit quibusdam Willo' Mac Ranell O'Regane et Connor Mac Teige O'Mahowne execut' ⁊c. suis le carruc' terr' de Gortroe et Duneganon pro termino vigint' et un' ann' sub annual' reddit' quatuordecim libr' ster', prout per articulos pred' dat' ejusd' die et anno plen' apparet. Et ulterius dic' quod pred' Daniel Mac Carty per indentur' suam dat' primo die Octobris anno domini 1630, dimisit cuid' Willmo Hollcombe de Culenypisse pred' cum un' molendin' vocat' Ballynadlyhy Mill, pro termino trigint' et unius annor' sub annual' reddit' quadragint' libr' ster'. Et ulterius Jur' pred' dic' quod pred' Daniel Mac Carty per indentur' suam dat' quinto die Octobr' 1629 dimisit cuid' Donnogh Oge O'Morroghou execut' ⁊c. suis carruc' terr' de Knockanedyne et le dimid' carruc' terr' de Currygyllygaue pro termino vigint' et unius annor' sub annual' reddit' vigint' septem libr' ster'. Et ulterius Jur' pred' dic' quod pred' Daniel Mac Carty per  p.136 indentur' suam dat' quarto die Novembr' 1629 dimis' Edvardo Rashligh execut' ⁊c. suis le dimid' carrucat' terr' de Cluoncouse pro termino vigint' et unius annor' sub annual' reddit' duodecim libr' ster'. Et ulterius Jur' pred' dic' quod Donell Mac Carty defunct' avus prefat' Daniell in vita sua fecit quoddam fact' dat' vicesimo secundo die Novembr' 1593 cuid' Willmo' Mac Rickard Irregane nup' de Burryn gen' defunct' prout' per fact' pred' dat' eisd' die et anno plen' apparet, cujus quid em fact' et indorsament inde tenor sequit' in hec verba: To all, ⁊c. Et ulterius Jur' pred' dic' quod quidam Owen Mac Carty modo defunct', avunculus pred' Donell avi pred' Daniel (cum al') fec' quoddam factum dat' ultim' die April' anno domini 1579 prefat' Willmo' Mac Rickard Irregane prout per fact' pred' dat' eisd' die et anno plen' apparet, cujus quid' fact' et indorsament' inde tenor sequit' in hec verba: Sciant presentes, ⁊c. {} Memorand' quod Dermott O'Callihane clamat capital' redd' de Dromgarduffe, et le dimid' quarter' terr' de Cnockes et le dimid' carruc' terr' de Killvurrou esse ejus et hereditatem suam. Et quod Donogh Mac Owen Carty clamat tres gneeves terr' de Derry tres gneeves terr' in Farnegullnuhile et du' gneeves terr' de Blooyd esse jus et hereditatem suam. Et quod Cormuck Mac Donogh Carty clamat lez tres oriental' gneeves {} occidental' dimid' carrucat' terr' de Dromgarroffe esse jus et hereditat' suam.

To the Right Hon. his Majesty's Commissioners appointed for putting in Execution the Actt of Parliament intitled, An Act for the better Execution of his Majesties Gracious Declaration for the Settlement of his Kingdom of Ireland, and Satisfaction of the Several Interests of Adventurers, Soldiers, and other his subjects there.270

The Claime of Donogh O'Drisscoll, alias Carragh, Sonne and heir of Conor O'Drisscoll, late of Donegaule in the County of Cork, Gentleman, deceased, and of Catherine Driscoll, alias Carthy, the Relict of the said Connor.

The humble Petition of the said Donagh and Catherine.

Shewing that the Claimant's Grandfather Donogh O'Drisscoll, alias Carragh, late of Downlong, in the County of Cork, Gentleman, deceased,  p.137 was, on the twenty-second day of October, 1641, seised in his demesne as of fee Taile to him and the heires males of His Body, and in the actuall possession of the Castles, Townes, and Lands, and other the particulars in the annexed Schedule specified other than that certain Parcells in the said Schedule mentioned, which hath been by the said Donogh the Grandfather conferred on the Claimant Katherine for her Joynture upon her intermarriage with the said Connor, then Son and heir of the said Donogh, which she was in possession of on the 22nd day of October, 1641, and before, and the said Donogh, the grandfather, being of all and singular the premisses so seized and possessed, Died so seized or possessed In or about the year 1647, after and by whose death, inasmuch as the said Connor died in the lifetime of the said Donogh, all and Singular the premisses descended and came unto the Claimant or Grandson and heir unto the said Donogh, who thereupon entred, when together with the Claimant Catherine, were severally and respectively in the quiet possession thereof, until the Claimant Katherine and the said Claimant Donogh, being then a Minor of very tender years, were thereout expulsed by the late usurped Powers, in or about the year 1654, or thereabouts, the Claimant Katherine further sayeth that shee, after the death of the said Connor, and by vertue of the Settlement, made unto her as aforesaid, entered into the Lands secured unto her for her Jointure as aforesaid, and was in the peaceable possession thereof until expulsed as aforesaid.

That the Claimants. and the said Donogh the Grandfather behaved themselves Civilly, Innocently, and Inoffensively, during the Rebellion, never acting any thing against his Majesty or Peace of the Nation, and as a further testimony of theire loyalty and fidelity, from time to time observed and obeyed his Majestye' commands, as well those Commands and Directions held forth in the Artickles of peace concluded and made in the year of our Lord God (1646) and the Peace made in the year (1648) by the order and authority of his late majesty of ever blessed memory as others his Comands, and that they have likewise ever since behaved themselves inoffensively, nor ever sued for any Decree or Lands in Conoght or Clare, but always patiently expected the happy Restauration of his Gracious Majesty.

The humble petition and Desire of the Claimants is therefore that  p.138 your Honours will be pleased to grant the Claimants, as innocent Persons the Order and Decree of this Honorable Court, that they may thereby be restored to and confirmed in their Right and possessions Respectively, and according to the Directions of the said Act of Settlement, be restored to the meane rates thereof, so far as the same is consistent with the said Act, and to that end that all necessary prosses to his Majesty's Attorney Generall, and to all others therein concerned, be afforded them, and that their claime be received.

The schedule annexed to the Claime of Donogh O'Driscoll, alias Carragh, expressing as well the Names and Quantities of Plowlands held by them as his ancient Inheritance, as also his Chiefries, Royalties, and other Duties appertaining to him in his Estate in the County of Corke, and being tennant in taile as heir male of the body of Donogh O'Drisscoll the Claimant's Grandfather.

Co.ParishLands and DenominationsPresent PossessorsBaronyDebentir
CorkTullaghThe Castle, town and lands of Downinglonge, containing three plowlands in Heritance in the Island of InishskirkaneHenry BeecherCarbryThe Heires or Assigns of Sir John Renalds, whom I know not
Id.IdemThe town and lands of Sleevemore, containing three half plowlands in the Island of Inishskirkane, inheritance morgaged from me.Captain JarvoysIdem
Id.IdemThe town and lands of Rineidrolane, containing three half plowlands, inheritance and part of my mother's jointure; it lyes in the above said Island.Henry BeecherIdemThe heires or assigns of Sir John Renalds
CorkTullaghThe town and land of Clidaugh containing half a plowland in the Island of InishskirkaneHenry BeecherCarbryThe heires or assigns of Sir John Renalds
Id.IdemThe town and lands of Kilmoone, containing half a plowland in the Island of Inishskirkane morgaged to meIdemIdemThe heires or assigns of Sir John Renalds
Id.IdemThe town and lands of Kinnigh, containing half a plowland in the aforesaid Island morgaged to meIdemIdemThe heires or assigns of Sir John Renalds
Id.CreaghThe Castle, town and lands of Downegaule, containing two plowlands, inheritance, & part of my mother's JoyntureIdemIdemThe heires or assigns of Sir John Renalds

To the Honorable His Majestie's Commisioners appointed for executinge the Act of Settlement and the Explanatory Act of the same.

May it please your Honors.

Pursuant to your Honour's Instructions wee have compared and examined the Petition and Schedule of Coll. Cornelius O'Driscoll.

Com. Corke.

East and West Carbury.

 p.140

Ballymackaun, 337 acres.
Baltymore, alias Dunenashead, 545 acres.
Ballyliney,
Ragh,
Gortard,
Lackaghane,
Bally-Iland,
Monig,
Rincormack,
Cree,
Gurtylomaue,
Ardnavohonnane,
Lappagh,
East plowlands of Licke,
containing in the whole 1500 acres. 271
King's Letter read—in poss. Aug. 63—To Have a Certe Indorsed.

[Reporte upon the Peticon and Schedule of Coll. Cornelius O'Driscoll.]

Note—This Record seems imperfect. However, all that remains is contained above.

J. H.

On 12th August, 3 It Car. II. A Grant to Colonel Richard Townsend, Jeremy Donovane, gent. Daniell O'Donovane, Esq. Colonel Cornelius O'Driscoll, Sir Edward Scott and Alexander Heyden, gent. or reducing of Quit Rents.

Patent Roll.

1st May, 16th year of Queen Elizabeth, Letters Patents the Office of Proctor of the Cathedral Church of Rosse.

3rd June, 26th year of Elizabeth Pardon (general) to Fynyn O'Driscoll and others.

Last day of August, 32d year of Queen Elizabeth—Pardon (general) to Finnig Mac Dermott O Driscoll and others.

There is a Surrender from the O'Driscolls to the Crown, inrolled on the Patent Roll, 5th James I. 2nd pars, facie. See Extract from this in the Printed Repertory Patent Roll, James I. given above, p. 99.

See O'Driscoll Inquisitions Nos. 208, 209, 344, 477, Charles I.


Remarks on the Preceding Tract

 p.141

Two ancient vellum copies of this work are in existence, one in Leabhar Leacain, (the Book of “Lecan”,) which was compiled from various other MSS. by Gilla Isa Mor Mac Firbisigh of Leacan, in the county of Sligo, in the year 1418. This copy begins at folio 119, b, b, and ends with folio 122, b, b. The other copy is preserved in Leabhar Bhaile an Mhuta, (the Book of “Ballymote”,) which was compiled by various persons, but chiefly by Solamh O'Droma, from older MSS. about the year 1390, for Tomaltach Mac Donnchadha (Mac Donough) then chief of the territories of Tir Oililla, Corann, Airteach, Tir Thuathail, and Clann Fearmaighe, extending into the counties of Sligo, Roscommon, and Leitrim. This copy begins at folio 109, b, b, and ends at 112, b.

There is also a copy of it which was transcribed on paper by Dubhaltach Mac Firbisigh in the year 1650, in the Library of Lord Roden, and a second paper copy made from the latter, by Mr. E. Curry, in the Library of the Royal Irish Academy.

Corca-Laidhe, the original country of the Dairinne, or O'Driscolls and their correlatives, was originally co-extensive with the diocese of Ross 272, or Ros-ailithre of which St. Fachtna of this race, who flourished in the sixth century, was the first bishop. But on the encrease of the power and population of the Deirgthine or race of Oilill Olum, the original territory of the Dairinne was much circumscribed. Long before the English Invasion the Ui-Eathach-Mumhan, or O'Mahonys, wrested from them that portion of their territory called Fonn-Iartharach i. e. West land, otherwise  p.142 Ivahagh, comprising the parishes of Kilmoe, Scoole, Kilcrohane, Durris, Kilmaconoge and Caheragh, in the barony of West Carbery; and after the English Invasion various encroachments were made upon their lands by the English, and by families of the race of Oilill Olum, then recently driven from their original locations by the English invaders. The Barrys encroached on the Eastern side of their principality; the O'Sullivans (Ui Suileabhain); who had been originally seated at Cnoc Raffonn and Cluain-meala, (Clonmel,) in the now county of Tipperary, were driven from thence in the year 1192, when they settled in the mountains of the now counties of Cork and Kerry, and finally wrested from the Dairinne or Corca-Laidhe, that portion of their territory now comprised in the baronies of Beare and Bantry. About the same period the Cairbre Aebhdha, or O'Donovans, O'Collins, &c. who had been seated in the barony of Cois Maighe, (Coshma,) and in the plain on the west side of the river Maigh, (Maigue,) in the now county of Limerick, were driven from thence by the Fitzgeralds, and they settled in the present county of Cork, and wrested from the Corca-Laidhe, a considerable portion of the northern part of their territory. This latter sept transferred their tribe name of Cairbre from the banks of the Maigh to the south of the Bandon, where it is still retained, applied to an extensive territory, now the four baronies of Carbery. The Corca-Laidhe, though circumscribed, were, however, independent of their new invaders, until the year 1232, when Cormac Gott, the third son of Mac Carthaigh Mor, acquired dominion over the entire region, now forming the four baronies of Carbery. This event is briefly noticed in the old copy of the Annals of Innisfallen, preserved in the Bodleian Library, as follows: [...] 273  p.143 ‘A.D. 1232. Domhnall God 274 Mac Carthaigh was taken prisoner by his own brother Cormac Mac Carthaigh, but he was set at liberty by him at the end of a quarter; and immediately after this Domhnall went at the instance of Maghnus O'Cobhthaigh and the daughter of O'Muircheartaigh (O'Moriarty) to commit an unneighbourly act against Muircheartach O'Mathghamhna, (O'Mahony,) a thing which he did, for he slew the three sons of O'Mathghamhna, and plundered himself; and, in consequence of this, Domhnall Cairbreach and his race remained in the south from that forth.’ (AI, 1232.2.)

The surrounding tribes still continued to encroach upon the Corca-Laidhe, until at length they narrowed their territory to the limits of the following parishes, which, according to the Regal Visitation Book of 1615, constitute the rural deanery of Colleymore and Colleybeg, viz.:
‘Myross, Glanbarahane, (now Castlehaven,) Tullagh, Creagh, Kilcoe, Aghadowne and Cleere. In this territory they built the castles of Gleann, Bearchain, or Castlehaven, Lough-Hyne, Ardagh, Baltimore, Dun-na-n-gall, Dun-an-oir in Cape Clear Island, Rincoliskey, and a Castle and Abbey on Sherkine Island.’ (Regal Visitation Book) In 1636, the entire of O'Driscoll's country,  p.144 as well as those of the O'Donovans, O'Mahonys, and several septs of the Mac Carthys paid tribute to MacCarthy Reagh—see Inquisition in Addenda F.

That the ancient Irish should have been careful to preserve their genealogies need not be a matter of surprise, and that these are perfectly authentic may be expected as they were entered in the local books of pedigrees, and preserved in the poems of family or hereditary poets. Those of the lowest rank among a great tribe, traced and retained the whole line of their descent with the same care, which in other nations was peculiar to the rich and great; for it was from his own genealogy each man of the tribe, poor as well as rich, held the charter of his civil state, his right of property in the cantred in which he was born, the soil of which was occupied by one family or clan, and in which no one lawfully possessed any portion of the soil if he was not of the same race with the chief.

This was also the case with the Welsh, as we are informed by Giraldus, in the first chapter of his Cambriae Descriptio, and again, more particularly in the seventeenth chapter, where he writes as follows:
‘Generositatem vero et generis nobilitatem prae rebus omnibus magis appetunt. Unde et generosa conjugia plus longe cupiunt quam sumptuosa vel opima. Genealogiam quoque generis sui etiam de populo quilibet observat, et non solum avos, atavos sed usque ad sextam vel septimam et ultra procul generationem memoriter et prompte genus enarrat in hunc modum, Resus filius Gruffini, filii Resi, filii Theodori, filii Aeneae, filii Oeni, filii Hoeli, filii Cadelli, filii Roderici Magni, et sic deinceps.
Genus itaque super omnia diligunt, et damna sanguinis atque dedecoris ulciscuntur. Vindicis enim animi sunt et irae cruentae, nec solum novas et recentes verum etiam veteres et antiquas velut instantes vindicare parati.’ (Cambriae Descriptio, cap. 17)


 p.147

Gilla Brighde Mac Conmidhe

  1. Death of my heart! Is the head of Brian
    In a strange country under cold clay;
    O head of Brian of Sliabh Sneachta, 275
    Eire after thee is an orphan!
  2. To the king of the Saxons 276 eastwards
    Was carried the head 277 of the king of the Gaeidhil 278 by the Galls 279
    Is it not sufficient victory over the Gaeidhil
    That thou, O head, art triumphed over!
  3. It is equal to all the evil the foreigners have done
    To bring the head of Brian to London,
    It is a sore consummation of his fate, 280
    That his head should be in a stranger's church.
  4.  p.149
  5. Alas! that his noble face was removed from Dun, 281
    From the place wherein is the grave of Patrick,
    It is grievous to us that the king of Caiseal 282
    Is not interred near the relics of the Tailginn. 283
  6. In Ard Macha 284 are the interments
    Of the Ulaidh with their lime-stone graves,
    Among the tomb-stones of our Clann-Neill;
    Alas! that his resurrection shall not be there!
  7. There is in London under a white flag-stone 285
    A head which the Gaeidhil would dearly ransom
    All my cattle, although thou hearest it not, O head!
    I would give to ransom thee.
  8. He gave twenty horned cows
    For my poem, 286 it was a goodly purchase,
    Were they twenty cows with golden horns,
    My honor was greater and better.
  9. I brought away with me on another day
    Twenty cows at May-day,
    Along with much other wealth besides
    Not counting gold and raiment.
  10. I received a better gift,
    The blessing of the chief king of Eire;
    The reward for his poem was not trifling;
    But more lasting the fame of his blessing.
  11.  p.151
  12. All have poured from east and west
    Upon my cattle since the good Brian departed,
    They and my king have passed away at the same time,
    The noble Brian, from whom I got them. 287
  13. Were we without horse, without cow,
    For want of cattle we would not repine,
    And there would not want be felt in my house,
    If the king of Macha 288 were living.
  14. Wo is me! it would seem distressing to Brian
    To see what indignity is offered me;
    Injustice to me, east or west, would be unlikely
    If Brian were living.
  15. The war of the Gaeidhil with the foreigners
    Was playing for a check at foreign chessmen;
    The foreign pawns checked our chess king!
    We cannot now escape defeat.
  16. The top of our corn was cut down
    By a hideous exotic horde of reapers;
    Who came against us on Sunday 289 to Dun,
    When the crop was but to ripeness turning.
  17. Till the day at Dun no battle was gained
    Over the race of Mileadh of Teamhair; 290
    But “when it is the destiny 291 of people to pass away,”
    Valor or prowess is of no avail.
  18.  p.153
  19. In its own time we have not seen
    The deed which would relieve Eire,
    As valor, it is ascertained,
    Ought to be exerted on the cessation of prowess.
  20. From the number of forts which he plundered and burned
    From the number of great battles which he gained;
    Every flank of a fortressed town which he shattered,
    By the foreigners of Dun was revenged.
  21. The foreigners from London,
    The hosts from Port-Lairge,  292
    Came in a bright green body thither,
    In gold and iron armour.
  22. Unequal they engaged in the battle,
    The foreigners and the Gaeidhil of Teamhair,
    Fine linen shirts 293 on the Race of Conn, 294
    And the foreigners in one mass of iron.
  23. The cause of our defeat was our being in guilt,
    In the battle for the possession of Maenmhagh;
    Ah! if all were induced to abstain from the battle!
    Sunday was no day for fighting. 295
  24.  p.155
  25. Of what avail is valor or many spears?
    By poison a fierce battle is gained,
    Until O'Neill was disabled by poison, 296
    The prowess of the hero was terrible.
  26. The cow of a poor man was never brought to his house,
    The reliquary of a priest he never violated,
    What curse could have followed him for which the battle was
    There is no church against which he sinned.
  27. A steed, with his ornamental bridle on his head,
    Should pass throughout Eire,
    Through Inis Fail 297 to Brian of Breagh: 298
    It would pass 299 without any one putting a hand to the bridle.
  28. A woman 300 would pass to Brian
    From Sliabh Callainn 301 to Coirrshliabh; 302
    The walk among the Gaeidhil is frightful to me
    Since the chief man of Eire has departed.
  29. O'Neill did not violate a sanctuary;
    He did not disobey the church;
    The prosperity of Brian was destroyed by poison;
    To be pious after him is difficult.
  30. The heroes of Leath-Chuinn 303 in the battle
    Fell together in defence of Teamhair; p.157
    As when the prop 304 is withdrawn from a house
    Its ridge falls down after it.
  31. The fall of the chieftains of the men of Fail
    Is not to be compared to this one plague,
    The chieftains of the Gaeidhil being mortally wounded,
    One man would supply their loss. 305
  32. There, upon the heroes of Leath-Chuinn,
    Reproach on reproach is heaped by us:
    To have allowed the king into the battle was not right;
    Alas the deed, that he was not prevented.
  33. To leave the king of Oileach among the slain
    Is a disgrace to the Race of Eoghan 306 of white steeds,
    It was a false guarding in the soldiers of Eamhain, 307
    To have allowed their lord to break through them.
  34. After the bloody battle
    The Gaeidhil cannot move:
    The flag-staff of Fail moves not west or east,
    Only because Brian liveth not.
  35. It was the first battle 308 which Brian fought,
    In which the head-chieftain of Oirghialla fell;
    Until our fair chief fell at Dun,
    His footstep was not put back.
  36. When Brian of Beann Abhaidh 309 fell
    In the battle of Dun by the barbarians,
    For the battles gained by the races of Niall of old
    We have there fully paid.
  37.  p.159
  38. Our battle at the heavy Craebh-tulcha 310
    At Dun was avenged upon us;
    Eochaidh 311 fell in the eastern conflict
    But it did not here go unrevenged.
  39. The battle of the placid ford of Ath-solais 312
    We paid for to the foreign tribe;
    The defeat at Dun revenged our battle
    On the smooth plain of Magh-n-Athrach.
  40. At the battle of Rath-bhoth, 313 which we gained,
    At the battle of the fair-sided Sliabh-Toadh, 314
    The rivers were full of blood,
    On the plain of Maighin 315 in Mumhan.
  41. The battle of Sliabh-Caein 316 was fought by Niall
    To defend us against the country of Oirghialla,
    Our battle in the fertile valley of Moin-ghlas, 317
    Alas! was revenged, eastwards, at old Dun.
  42. We fought a battle at another time,
    At Dun-droma Dairinne 318
    We caused slaughter at Loch Cuan 319 in my memory
    But, alas! we have paid for it.
  43.  p.161
  44. Proud were our people
    When we fought the battle of Formaeil; 320
    And Oh! high were our spirits
    When the battle of Caisbhearna 321 was won.
  45. Chess of the shin-bones of Leinstermen 322
    In our work-shop was constructed,
    Smooth chessmen were on the tables of our ancestors
    Of the bare bones of Leinstermen.
  46. The tribute of Ath-cliath from the foreign race, 323
    The hasting of the leathern coats obtained
    We got hostages from Caiseal-Chuirc; 324
    At the knotty wood of Dun it was revenged.
  47. Ceallachan, king of Caiseal Chuirc,
    In a fetter 325 was brought to our house,
    We burned the palace of Ceann-coradh 326
    In which were steeds without fetters.
  48. Conchubhar, the son of Tadhg, 327
    Chief king of Connacht was a captive at our court; p.163
    The hostages of the king of the foreigners 328 were in our custody;
    Alas! that it was not at home he tarried.
  49. The victories,—till the death of Brian of Banna,—
    The preys, deaths, and defeats,
    And all the achievements of the foreigners till the slaying of O'Neill,
    Were to us nothing but mere reproach.
  50. A severance of the heart from the body
    Is the death of Brian of Loch Laeghaire: 329
    Not a white wound, but a head wound 330 to us
    Is the loss of the man from Coirrshliabh, whom I lament.
  51. The beheading blow of the men of Fail
    Is the death of O'Neill of white-glebed Oileach
    The death of the tall fair hero is a manacling of the Gaeidhil
    And a dispersion of the men of Eire.
  52. The tomb of the king of Oileach of thick hair,
    you people who forget its identity,
    I would point out to you the grave
    On the north side of the church. 331
  53. Brian Borumha 332 in the north in the church,
    Brian O'Neill of red-armed Oileach, p.165
    Farther to the west is the descendant of Conn of Cobha,
    And his feet towards Brian Borumha.
  54. As Mac Liag of Luimneach 333 said
    To the head of Conaing 334 of battle-troops
    “It grieves me that an enemy has cut it off”—
    The head of O'Neill, beloved guest!
  55. Thirteen score bright years
    And one thousand from the birth of Christ in full,
    Until on the dark green sward fell
    Brian at bright Dun-da-leath-ghlas.
  56. Twenty enduring years had passed
    From the battle of Caim-Eirge 335 of red spears;
    One year too and part of a year
    To the death of the descendant of Niall Naoi-ghiallach.
  57. Bitter to my heart to see the grey Galls
    Triumphing over the slaughtered Maghnus; 336
    That the head of O'Cathain, attracting no notice,
    Should be seen on the bridge of Dun.
  58. A night did Maghnus of Macha remain
    Between wounded bodies;
    If Brian had not been in the slaughter
    There would be no loss like O'Cathain.
  59. Maghnus 337 himself, Eachmarcach 338 too,
    Muircheartach, Donnchadh, Domhnall, p.167
    And Niall O'Cathain all falling with wounds:
    Alas! it was not one loss only.
  60. A misfortune to our children and our wives
    Was the killing of Maghnus O'Cathain,
    That scion of Inbhear-Abhaigh 339 never neglected
    A son or daughter of Eoghan's race.
  61. Vain is the joy of this perishable world
    Wo be to him whom it deceives after Domhnall;
    Powerful was the voice of O'Carra over the rest,
    Alas! that the descendant of Niall Caille 340 should obtain such a reward.
  62. Often had I gone on a visit of pleasure.
    To see Amhlaeibh O Gairmleadaigh; 341
    Why shoud I go now to the house, though beside me,
    Alas! It is now a house without Amhlaeibh.
  63.  p.169
  64. Conchubhar of Malainn, 342 son of Conn,
    Women and men lament at Faendruim; 343
    O'Duibhdhirma 344 is a breach in our house,
    A people without head are his race.
  65. With Cian 345 of the fleet hounds disappeared
    The nobility and glory of Eire;
    Removed from us were wisdom and comeliness
    When Cian was hidden in the grave.
  66. Want of friends and of wealth
    Is Mac Cana to the Race of Eoghan:
    Donnsleibhe Mac Cana 346 the fair-skinned
    Is a loss to hospitality and to valor.
  67. Wo to him who wielded the axe or spear,
    By which fell Cu Uladh of Eamhain; 347
    Great the pity that thou beneath the axe hast fallen,
    Oh Cu-Uladh O'h-Anluain! 348
  68.  p.171
  69. There would be no weakness in Leath-Chuinn,
    If Mac Lochlainn 349 had not been slain
    From this day of the death of generous Brian;
    'Tis grievous that Diarmaid lived not after him.
  70. The son of Niall O'Neill now
    Who was in the succession to his patrimony;
    A blossom not ripened into fruit
    Was Conchubhar, 350 when carried off from us all.
  71. The sons of the king of Connacht of Cam Meadhbha 351
    Deserted not their lord
    Until every noble prince was cut down
    Of the valiant scions of Cruachan.
  72. The son of Tighearnan 352 fell in the east,
    And the curling-haired son of Cormac, 353
    And O'Maeilsheachlainn of all Midhe 354
    Of the fine race of Conn, by the foreigners.
  73. The comely youth of great Eamhain Macha
    Fell by them on the day of the violent battle,
    The great complaisant O'Duibheamhna 355
    Good right have his people to mourn him.
  74.  p.173
  75. Alas! deep grief overspread the country
    To anticipate the death of O'Duibhlin; 356
    Gofraidh our grief unto the judgment-day;
    Generous of his banquet was the youth.
  76. Seven days wanting of a month
    Before the battle Ruaidhri 357 was slain;
    It was a drop before the shower 358 for us to part
    With the blue eyes of O'Gairmleadhaigh.
  77. O'Neill the great 359 and his son,
    (Dear are the oak and the sapling,)
    Oh, what a noble pair are they,
    Domhnall and Aedh of Oileach!
  78. Ardghal of Oileach under sacred mould
    In the Diseart of Doire Chalgaigh, 360
    Near the fair miraculous hill;
    Well do we remember O'Laithbheartaigh. 361
  79. Brighid the chaste of Cill-dara,  362
    My holy virgin, my woman friend,
    May she encircle my body like a warm girdle, 363
    May she come to visit me as a guest.


 p.174

Remarks on the Preceding Poem

The preceding poem is now translated and printed for the first time. The text has been obtained from four copies, the only MSS of it known to the Editor, which are preserved the one in a parchment MS. the property of John Nugent, Esq. of Farranconnell, County of Cavan, and the others in paper MSS. the property respectively of the late O'Conor Don, the Royal Irish Academy, and Mr. Eugene Curry, all copied by very good scribes.

The poem itself, as stated in all the MSS., was composed by Gilla Bhrighde Mac Conmidhe (or Gilbride Mac Namee) who was chief poet of Ulster in his time, and the friend and follower of Brian O'Neill, King of the Irish of the North, and Righdhamhna or heir presumptive to the throne of Ireland. The family of Mac Conmidhe, of which this Gilla-Bhrighde was the head, were hereditary poets to the northern Ui-Neill, and are still very numerous in Ulster. Maelseachlainn Mac Conmidhe (Loughlin Mac Namee) of Draperstown Cross in the County of Derry, was believed to be the head of this family in 1835, when he told the Editor several anecdotes of his ancestors.

Moryson states that the family of O'Neill lived in obscurity till the time of Bruce, 1318, but this is not exactly correct as will appear from the history of the hero of this poem.

Brian O'Neill, the hero of this poem, became King of the Cineal Eoghain, in the year 1241, after having defeated and slain his predecessor, Domhnall Mac Lochlainn, prince of Tir Eoghain, in the battle of Caimeirge. From this period to the year 1248, the Annals are silent about his exploits, although it would appear from this poem that he was not idle. In 1248, he made an expedition into Fermanagh, carrying light currachs from Loch Feabhail (Lough Foyle) across the plain of Magh-Ithe and Tearmann Daibheog, and launched them on Loch Eirne, the islands of which he plundered, and demolished a stone castle which had evidently been erected by the English. In 1252, however, he and his brother submitted and gave hostages to Maurice Fitzgerald,  p.175 lord Justice of Ireland, who had marched with a numerous force to Cluain-Fiachna (Clonfeacle). In the same year O'Domhnaill (Gofraigh or Godfrey) made a preying excursion into Tir-Eoghain [Tyrone] and seized many cows and prisoners, but O'Neill (Brian) pursued and came up with him near the boundary of Tir-Conaill where a conflict ensued between the two fierce Races of Eoghan and Conall, in which the former were defeated with the loss of many men and prisoners of distinction. This aggression on the part of O'Domhnaill created a dissention between the two Races, which very much weakened the power of the Irish of Ulster. In the year 1257 O'Domhnaill came to a pitched battle with Maurice Fitzgerald, the lord Justice at Creadran-cille in Ros-Cede near Sligo, in which he gained the victory after a desperate conflict; and after having engaged the lord Justice in single combat, in which both were severely wounded; and he followed up his success by driving the Geraldines and all the English from his borders, and demolished a castle which they had erected at Cael-Uisce near Belleek, on Loch Eirne, for securing their conquests in that country. After this brilliant success O'Domhnaill lived but one year during which he was lying on his bed (in an island in Loch Beitheach) suffering from the severe wounds which he had received in the battle of Creadran-cille.

When O'Neill received intelligence of his feeble condition, he collected his forces to invade Tir-Conaill, and sent messengers to O'Domhnaill to demand submission and hostages from the Cineal-Conaill, as now they had no chief capable of leading them to battle. The messengers, on delivering their embassy to O'Domhnaill, and receiving an answer that O'Domhnaill's people would not submit to O'Neill, returned to O'Neill with all possible speed.

O'Domhnaill now ordered the Race of Conall to assemble from all quarters and come to him; and after they had assembled at his summons, he ordered them to construct for him the bier in which his body should be finally carried to the grave, and to carry him in it in the midst of his people. This was accordingly done; and he exhorted his people to exert their bravery, and keep up their spirits, for that he himself, though feeble from his wounds, would once more lead them to victory. The Cineal Conaill then proceeded on their march against O'Neill's forces and met them near the mouth of the river Suileach  p.176 [the Swilly.] Here a fierce battle was fought between the kindred races, in which the Race of Eoghan were defeated and driven back, leaving behind them many men, horses, and much valuable property. The Cineal Conaill then set out for home, but on their arrival at the village of Congbhail [Conwal] in Gleann Suillighe, O'Domhnaill became very sick, and ordered the bier in which he was carried to be laid down on the street, and here he died the death of a hero, the wounds which he had received in his combat with Maurice Fitzgerald in the battle of Creadran-cille having bled afresh in this battle.

When O'Neill heard of the death of O'Domhnaill he again sent messengers to the Cineal Conaill to demand submission and hostages. Thereupon the Cineal Conaill held a council, to deliberate on what they should do, and whom they would elect as their chief. While they were deliberating on these subjects, Domhnall Og, the son of Domhnall Mor, presented himself at the meeting, having just arrived from Scotland where he was fostered. This noble youth, who was the son of Domhnall by the daughter of Cathal Croibh-dhearg O'Conchobhair (Charles the Redhanded O'Conor,) king of Connacht, was then in his eighteenth year, and was inaugurated at Cill Mic Neanain [Kilmacrenan] by O'Firghil, the Comharba of that Church and the subchiefs of Tir-Conaill. He conferred with O'Neill's emissaries in the Gaelic of Alba, and pronounced the demands of O'Neill as extravagant and exorbitant, and said in Erse “that every man should have his own world.”

O'Neill's ambition, however, was not lessened by this answer, for he made every effort to become not only sovereign of Ulster but even monarch of Ireland. In the same year he marched with his forces to Cael-Uisce on the borders of Tir-Conaill, where he held a conference with Hugh son of Felim O'Conor, king of Connacht, and Tadhg O'Briain, king of Thomond, and here, according to the Annals of Ulster and Clonmacnoise, the sovereignty of the Irish of Ireland was conferred on Brian O'Neill, and Hugh O'Conor delivered him hostages, and he received also the hostages of the O'Reillys, and of all the Ui-Briuin from Kells to Drumcliff. But a somewhat different account of this conference is given in the Caithreim Thoirdhealbhaigh, or Wars of Toirdhealbhach O'Briain, and in the Dublin copy of the  p.177 Annals of Innisfallen, in which it is incorrectly entered under the year 1252. It is stated in these works, that a general convention of the princes and nobility of Ireland assembled at Cael Uisge on the brink of Loch Eirne, in order to elect a supreme king over the Irish, to suppress the tyranny and usurpation of the English. Tadhg, son of Conchobhar na Siudaine O'Briain, repaired thither with most of the nobles of Munster and Connacht, and on his arrival at Cael Uisge, sent northwards across the river one hundred steeds as wages in token of vassalage to O'Neill. O'Neill, enraged at this offer, sent back the horses and two hundred steeds with golden bridles as wages to O'Briain, who refused to accept of them; and the consequence was that the meeting was broken up without choosing an ard-righ, or sole monarch for that time.

It looks very strange that neither Leland nor Moore should have noticed this attempt of the Irish chieftains to unite against the English, for, although the result was insignificant, the attempt had it succeeded would have proved disastrous to the English in Ulster.

The following is the account of the meeting at Cael Uisge given in the Caithreim Thoirdhealbhaigh:

Do bhí Goill fá'n am so tré lí(o)nadh i(o)mad uabhair agus antoile
ag fás agus ag fí(u)chadh i(o)nnta, ag imirt annfhlaithis agus éagcóra,
broide agus buan-argain ar Ghaedhalaibh agus ag buain a bh-fola
agus a bh-fearainn dí(o)bh go foiréigneach ann gach áit dá d-tigeadh
leo, agus mar thugadar Gaeidhil sin d' á n-aire, do thógradar iat
féin do réidhi(u)ghadh ó'n ann-bh-flaitheas aini(o)chtach sin na n-Gall
maille re h-aen aird-righ do thogha ós a g-ci(o)nn d' á n-geillfidís
uile; i(o)nnas go d-tiucfadh leo Eire do chosnamh do'n dul soin amhuil
fa dual dóibh. Uime sin do chineadar comhairle um coinne do
dhéanamh re chéile ar bhruach na h-Eirne oirear doimhnighe oileanaighe,
áit ar thi(o)nóladar uaisle agus ard-urradha Gaeidheal
Eireann ar aen láthair.

Dala Thaidhg taeibhghil Caeil-uisge, deagh-mhac cian-teasdach
Conchubhair Uí Bhriain triallas mar aen le h-urmhór uaisle
Leithe Mogha agus Connacht d' i(o)nnsuidhe na dála soin, agus tigid
slogha Uladh uile um O'Néill ann. Ba nós anallód gíbe righ
 p.178 tri(o)cha chéd no cóige do ghlacfadh tabhartas no tuarasdal ó árdfhlaith
oile go n-gabhadh mar aen ris an d-tuarastal soin umhla
agus oglachás an féin maille re bheith umhal do mar chodhnach,
agus um dí(o)l cí(o)sa agus chána ris. Iar suidhe 'san g-coimhthi(o)nól
do na h-uaislibh sin do chuir O'Briain céad each tar an sruith ba
thuaidh a n-ainm tuarasdail cum Uí Néill; agus mar do chonairc
O Néill sin, ro órdaigh go bh-feirg mhóir bh-fuireachair tar an
sruith chédna tar ais dá chéad each go n-a sriantaibh bláth-órdha
g-cimhis-gléigeala do sholatair sé a g-comhair na dála soin,
chum a m-bronta d' fearaibh Eireann do'n dul soin, tré mhéid a
chirt agus a chumas ar Eirinn do chosnamh tar aen oile do
Ghaedhalaibh, agus fós gur aentuigheadar fir Uladh uile ris, an
trath sin. Agus ar fhaicsint na n-each sin go na sriantaibh,
d' uasal Thadhg cuiri(o)s na h-eich céadna ó n-a bh-fuirinn laechra
tar an sruith d' fosdadh an tuarasdail d' ais nó d' éigin; Agus
an tan do thug O'Néill uaill agus ard-mheanma Uí Bhriain d' á
aire, triallas d' á thigh fa dhi(o)mdha agus táinig do'n easaenta
soin gur sgaeileadar fir Eireann as an dáil sin, gan ard-chodnach
do thogha ná d' óirdneadh ortha féin, ná fos cine ar
chomhairle um Eire do chosnamh re Gallaibh, acht amháin go g-coimhthi(o)nóladaeis
doríse a g-ci(o)nn athaidh 'na dheadhaigh sin um an g-cúis
céadna; gidheadh tángadar a n-urmhór d' én-mhéin áirdthighearnas
do ghabháil ortha féin d' uasal Thadhg.

The foreigners, through much pride and haughtiness with which they were filled and inflated, were exerting tyranny, injustice, captivity and constant depredation upon the Gaeidhil and taking their cattle and their lands from them with violence wherever they were able. And when the Gaeidhil perceived this, they wished to free themselves from that cruel tyranny of the foreigners by electing one sovereign over them to whom they should all yield hostages, that they might by this means defend Eire as they were accustomed to do. Wherefore they came to the resolution of holding a conference with each other on the margin of the deep harboured islandful Eirne. Here the nobles and chief lords of the Gaeidhil of Eire assembled together.

With respect to the whitesided Tadhg-Cael-uisge, the goodly and  p.179 far-famed son of Conchubhar O'Briain, he proceeded with the greater part of Leath-Mhogha and Connacht to that meeting; and all the hosts of Ulster came there with O'Neill. It was a custom formerly that whenever the King [chief] of a Trícha chéd, or of a province, would receive a gift or wages from another great chief, he thereby signified that he became a subject and a vassal to him, as his lord, and that he was to pay him rent and tribute. After these nobles had sat in the assembly O'Briain sent one hundred steeds northwards across the stream in the name of wages to O'Neill; and when O'Neill perceived this he, with great violent anger, ordered to be sent across the same stream two hundred steeds with their gold-ornamented white-bordered bridles, which he had collected for bestowing on the men of Eire at this meeting on account of his right and power beyond any other of the Gaeidhil to contest for Eire, and moreover because all the men of Ulster were obedient to him at that time. When the noble Tadhg saw these steeds with their bridles, he sent the former steeds from their heroes across the stream to retain the subsidy by will or by force.

When O'Neill perceived the pride and high-mindedness of O'Briain he returned home in sorrow; and the result of that dissension was that the men of Eire dispersed from the meeting without selecting or appointing any supreme King over them, or even agreeing upon a resolution about defending Eire against the foreigners, except that they would in some time after meet again for the same purpose. But the greater number of them consented that Tadhg O'Briain should assume the chief lordship over them.

In 1259 Brian O'Neill and Felim O'Conchobar held a conference at Daimh-inis [Devenish] in Loch Eirne, to deliberate upon the best means of checking the encreasing power of the English in Ireland. But in the mean time treachery was at work in Ulster: Aedh Buidhe O'Neill, the next aspirant to the chieftainship of the Cineal-Eoghain, conspired with the young O'Domhnaill to weaken the power of Brian, and they plundered Tir-Eoghain and obtained hostages from some of the Oirghialla.

In the next year Aedh O'Conchobar (Hugh O'Conor) King of Connacht, marched into Ulster with the elite of his chieftains and forces to assist Brian O'Neill to crush his English and Irish enemies, and came  p.180 to an engagement with them on the Sunday within the Octave of Ascension day. In this battle Brian O'Neill was certainly not joined by all the chieftains of Ulster for it appears from the names of the slain that he had not any forces from Ulidia or Tir-conaill, and it is also clear that the people of Fearmanach and Oirghialla, with the exception of O'h-Anluain, had deserted him. This is also quite clear from several notices in the annals, and particularly from one under the year 1261, which states, that after the battle of Dun (Down) O'Domhnaill made a predatory incursion into Tir-Eoghain, and plundered and burned the greater part of it.

The following notice of the battle of Dun-da-leath-ghlas is given in the Annals of Ulster. 364

It is thus noticed in the Annals of Clonmacnoise: “A. D. 1260. Hugh O'Connor went to the North to assist Bryan O'Neale against the English, with a great company of Connoughtmen, where the said Bryan with the forces of Tyreowen and Hugh O'Connor with their accomplices went to give battle to the English, in which battle Bryan O'Neale, named the King of the Irish of Ireland, was killed, with these ensuing of the Irish nobility, vizt. Donnell O'Kearney; Dermott Maglaughlyn; Magnus O'Cahan; Kyan O'Hinnerge; Donnsleyve Macanna; Hugh O'Cahan; Mortagh O'Cahan; Connor O'Duffdirma and Hugh his son; Awley O'Garmley; Cowuly O'Hanlon; and fifteen of the chiefest of the family of the O'Kahans.”

 p.181

“There was also slain of Connoughtmen these ensueing persons, vizt. Cahal mac Tyernan O'Connor; Gillchrist mac Connor mac Cormaick; Donnell mac Dermoda; Moyleronie Mac Donnogh; Cahal mac Donnogh mac Mortogh; Hugh mac Murtagh Fyn; Teig mac Cahal mac Bryen mac Moyledowne; Dermott mac Teig mac Moreye mac Thomalty O'Moyleroine; Connor Mac Gilbarie; Teig mac Keyn O'Garey; Gilleberry O'Koyne, and Charles the Bushopp O'Mory's son, with many others of the noble and ignoble sort.”

“This battle is called the battle of Downe-Dalehglass, and Bryan O'Neale is since called Bryan Catha in Dwyn (Brian catha an Dúin h-Ua Néill,) which is as much as to say in English Brian of the battle of Downe.”— (Mageoghegans Translation.)

The Annals of the Four Masters and the Annals of Kilronan agree with those of Clonmacnoise nearly word for word. But the old Annals of Innisfallen, preserved in the Bodleian Library at Oxford, differ from all the Ui Neill Annalists, and positively state in brief words that Brian O'Neill was killed by his own Gaeidhil, or Irish followers.

“A.D. 1260. Brien O'Neyll, rí Cinal Eoghin, d' á tugsat Gedhil braghdi, agus ná tug Kys na Kayn do rig Sagsan, do mharbhadh d' á Gedhelib fén, agus do ní do Gallibh, ac Dun-da-Leath-ghlas.”
“A.D. 1260. Brian O'Neill, king of Cineal Eoghain, to whom the Gaeidhil had given hostages, and who had not given rent or tribute to the king of the Saxons, was killed by his own Gaeidhil and some of the foreigners at Dun-Da-Leath-ghlas.”

The notice of this battle by the Anglo- Irish Annalists are curious though brief. Clyn notices it as follows:
“A.D. 1260. O'Neyl, regulus Ultonie occiditur cum multo populo apud civitatem de Duno, dominica infra octavas Ascensionis.” 365

In Grace's Annals the death of O'Neill is incorrectly entered under the year 1259:
“A.D. 1259. Stephanus de Longa Spata Justiciarius. Interfectus O'Neil ad Dunum.” 366

In Dowling's Annals this battle is incorrectly entered under the year 1258, thus—
“A.D. 1258. Stephanus de Longe Espee Justiciarius Hibernie  p.182 Anno 42 Henrice 3, interfecit O'Nel cum 352 ejus familiaribus in vico de Down.” 367

These Anglo-Irish authorities have been followed by Dr. Hanmer and Sir Richard Cox, who writes in his Hibernia Anglicana, p. 69, that “Stephen de Long Espee, Lord Justice, encountered O'Neale, and slew him and three hundred and fifty-two Irishmen in the streets of Down.”

From these Anglo-Irish authorities the following brief notice of the battle has been inserted in the Dublin copy of the Annals of Innisfallen, which was compiled in 1760:
“A.D. 1258 [1260] Brian Catha-an-Duin, son of Niall Ruadh, son of Aodh O'Neill, was slain at Dun-da-leath-ghlas by the English under the command of the Lord Justice Stephen de Long Espee, and a great slaughter was made of the chiefs of Cineal-Eoghain. The transaction happened on Sunday, and his head was carried to London.”

But Dr. Leland, who had the translation of the old Annals of Innisfallen made in 1665 by Dudley Mac Firbisse for Sir James Ware, of which he had a copy in the Library of Trinity College, Dublin, writes of this battle as follows:—
“Ireland, in the mean time, felt all the melancholy effects of a feeble government, an aspiring nobility, laws suspended and controuled, factions engendered by pride and oppression, the anarchy of the old natives, the injustice of the new settters, local feuds, and barbarous massacres. Brian O'Nial of Tirowen, who with his principality inherited an inveterate aversion to English government, rose up in arms, compelled some neighbouring chiefs to join his standard, and spread confusion through all the North. Stephen Long Espee was called out to oppose him, and notwithstanding some advantage gained in the field, would have found it difficult to suppress this insurrection, had not the Irish prince fallen by the treachery of his own people.— (Annals of Innisfallen MS.)” History of Ireland, vol. I. p. 230.

The poem affords us curious glimpses into the distracted state of Ireland at the period to which it refers, and into the kind of monarchical sway which the family of O'Neill claimed over all Ireland. The bard boasts of victories which Brian O'Neill and his ancestors had gained in their own province over their immediate neighbours in  p.183 Eastern Ulster and over the Kindred Race of Tir-Conaill. He next speaks of the proud circumstance, that Brian's ancestors had in their hall a chess-board formed of the bones of their hereditary enemies, the Leinstermen, which is rather a barbaric boast in 1260. The only fact referred to, worthy of an Irish prince of the house of Niall, or which could be considered national glory, is the carrying off the hostages and the tribute of the foreigners or Danes of Dublin. Not a single victory over the English is referred to, and the bard had nothing to say on that subject except that they had achieved nothing in Ulster till they slew his hero.


 p.327

Appendix

I. Documents relating to the O'h-Eidirsceoils (O'Driscolls)II. Documents relating to the Battle of Dun (Downpatrick) p.329

I. 1. Eoin Masach Ua Maethagain composed this. 368

  1. Farewell to the son of Conchobhar!
    It is to me parting with a real friend;
    From this death, as is evident,
    My eyes I have reddened;
    That I am without the son of Conchobhar
    You may believe from the palms of my hands.
  2. A noble man was O' h-Eidirsceoil
    A man from whom I received great honor
    I am now in Beirre Beare with little honor.
    After him, it is a general course of sorrow;
    The death of O' Eidirsceoil is true,
    The general grief of the countries acknowledge it.
  3. I recognised not this western land;
    My honor has been lost,
    The death of my kindred man
    Is not the loss of a game, but a lasting grief;
    It is a sign of Diarmaid's death
    That his people have lowered their respect for me.
  4.  p.331
  5. O' h-Eidirsceoil would not have listened
    To any one dishonoring me;
    When the noble smooth-faced chieftain died
    I am to-night unhonored;
    O' h-Eidirsceoil's hospitality has received
    At length its proper acknowledgment.
  6. The worthy minister of humanity
    Was O' h-Eidirsceoil my hospitable friend,
    After my kindred man
    I no longer obtain my desires;
    Noble friends with us are few
    With whom to stay in this western land.
  7. To separate from that Diarmaid
    Is a loss above every loss;
    The people of Beirre, through constant grief for him,
    Have not risen out after him.
    From eyelashes for that Diarmaid
    Crimson streams are the first that drop.
  8. Certain that for him is shown
    That state and church are in equal trouble;
    No blossom in his country is seen,
    No day comes on without fierce rain,
    The fruit is scarce on account of Conchobhar's son,
    And scarce is the milk with milch cows.
  9. No bee requires the watcher's care,
    Through heat, in the land of West Munster,
    The weather is gloomy on account of this one misfortune,
    And every person is deeply grieving;
    Nor Moon nor Sun shows brilliant-disc
    After him in the land of West Munster.
  10.  p.333
  11. I am in grief and in bad repute
    For the want of O' h-Eidirsceoil,
    The keen, candid, placid man,
    Who to humanity was a worthy minister,
    To my heart it is an unwholesome visit,—
    I on the grave of O'Eidirsceoil
  12. Out of Beirre we started
    Until his heirs grew up,
    Sorrowful am I beyond any of the Munstermen
    After the warlike hero.
    But now the children of a friend we have seen
    And with his heirs we shall remain.
  13. I shall say unto our Diarmaid,
    To the growth of thy fame thou didst yield
    To be saved thou mayest well hope.
    On the day of the dangerous judgment:
    Let it be believed that since thou departedst
    Hospitality is without a shepherd.
  14. Not to have died is to us a reproach;
    If I am well and thou livest not,
    My being well is to me a misery,
    Whilst thy death is boiling up my grief;
    It is a submersion in an abysm to us
    To live, and thou not living.
  15. I have gone into listlessness,
    Our pride was but a dream,
    Mighty is every one over us,
    My debility is not attended to,
    The cause of our heavy sadness
    Is that thy heir recognises us not.
  16.  p.335
  17. I used to be about my Diarmaid with my distresses
    Till the time for asking would I be moaning
    Thou wert the guarantee of my protection.
    It was thee we selected as our patron
    To pray for thee at masses,
    The schools are around their protector.
  18. The love of God thou hast of a certainty,
    It was not for nought thou obtainedst it;
    It is thou that causedst my heavy sadness;
    Thou were the guarantee for my relief,
    Thou hast given us a knowledge of affliction
    Thy fame lives; thou hast thyself departed.
  19. Thou wert my security,
    Thou wert my lord,
    None of them in this land
    Have I seen like unto thee,
    Greatly has thy death affected me,
    No one is mighty without a lord.
  20. Thou have brought distress upon all,
    The loss of thee presses on us,
    To depart with thee would behove us;
    Methinks it is a cause of debility;
    To confer with thee in visions
    Is a severe trial to us.
  21. I am on account of Diarmaid a banished man,
    In severe bondage of late,
    Without a security to redeem me,
    Grief for him first confusing me;
    Though we have sustained many losses
    The last afflction is the greatest.
  22.  p.337
  23. That death of O'h-Eidirsceoil
    To my tears is a dyer;
    His fame he ever continued to augment,
    From God he will receive pure honor;
    The death of O'h-Eidirsceoil has caused
    The tear to be the dyer of the eye.
  24. The fullest misfortune I have met
    Is the death of my kind patron;
    The chivalrous heroic scion,
    To me attending earnestly
    To remember Diarmaid's kindness!
    To me that kindness is devoutly dear.
  25. The death of a friend since we heard of,
    It is a disease not usually relieved;
    Near his grave-stone with torches
    All assemble in multitudes;
    I am alone in West Munster
    At fairs and in drinking houses.
  26. For us to asperse him would be dishonest,
    Good was Diarmaid's humanity;
    For spending I have not heard
    Of one like him in this western land;
    His worldly wealth is not near
    To his son after Diarmaid.
  27. At first I am not lively hearted
    At putting my back to the land of West Munster;
    Diarmaid gave with generous eagerness
    Without our asking what we sought;
    God has taken vengeance
    Now upon the land of West Munster.
  28.  p.339
  29. That he may be thine on the day of exaltation,
    (The man who is pain to my heart!)
    Better, O Jesus! that he has known thee;
    The heir of Ith is of thy flock;
    O Christ, it is cause of moan to us,
    The royal prey 369 thou hast taken!
  30. Heavier than any oppressive disease is
    Grief for him penetrating me;
    The death of one man has humbled me,
    I cannot be redeemed.
    Now, O God, be it avenged,
    My own desires 370 if I have heretofore obtained.
  31. The cross of Christ, the powerful cross!
    May it defend me now; be it not concealed;
    May His holy cross strengthen me;
    Close is the relationship;
    It is the powerful assistance,
    That cross in which we have believed.
  32. To praise the daughter of Anna
    For me is no evil work,
    Without altering the race of Adam,
    May the mother of Christ comfort us;
    Pray for us earnestly,
    Mary, the illustrious, whom we have chosen.

  33. I am Tanaidh O' Maelchonaire, and I am at Druim Cholpa in the house of Doirghre O'Duibhgheannain. For Cuconnacht O'Duibhgheannain this was transcribed.

 p.341

I. 2. Tadhg, Son Of Diarmaid Og O'Dalaigh, sang This. 371

  1. Tir-Luigheach has met a mischance,
    The angle of the habitations of noble hosts,
    The territory of bright lakes of war ships,
    Heavy is the misfortune which has overtaken them.
  2. At the time of her chiefs coming in to possession
    A heavy misfortune occurred to Tir-Luigheach,
    Her distress overtook her,
    The weight of affliction became manifest.
  3. When the territory heard her evil news,
    The expiration of O'h-Eidirsceoil's life,
    It was cause of malady in the speckled soft plain,
    The prosperity of the land of Teamhair it obstructed.
  4. The pure soil had been fruitful
    From the eye that has just been clouded;
    Softly bending with nuts in the land of the ancients
    Might the fair smooth hazel be seen.
  5. Alas! for the tribe who look upon
    The eye which now is motionless;
    Which lately was so rapid
    Viewing the extremity of his land.
  6. Early in seeking the heavy weapons
    Was the hand which has lost its motion;
    A fact that has suppressed the cheerfulness of the hosts
    Is the absence from that hand of its activity.
  7.  p.343
  8. The powerful tongue, which I used to hear,
    Is now bereft of its eloquence,
    No feeble word it ever uttered,
    It was forcible in time of difficulties.
  9. The ear which is no longer watching
    The beautiful borders of Corca-Laidhe,
    The smooth lands of ancient ships,
    Of oppression on them it would not hear.
  10. The declension of his mental powers
    Has ruined that land of Finghin,
    That smooth plain of hospitable mansions;
    Their powers of thought are now overclouded.
  11. The warning of the death of his noble hand
    Shall lower the prosperity of the land,
    It has poured out lamentations from its heart
    For the shortening of the knight's 372 life.
  12. Heavy the loss to Lughaidh's land
    Is the extinction of the mind of Conchobhar's son;
    His heir is far from the land,
    No greater cause of grief could we have.
  13. Twenty years and more besides
    His back is turned to his native territory;
    The son of Finghin standing the brunt of spears
    Without having partaken of the wine-feasts of Eire.
  14.  p.345
  15. Should he but reach the extremity of Munster
    It is certain that Conchobhar would press
    The battle of armed steeds for the raising of prey,
    In the broad rough third of Lughaidh.
  16. To plunder his chartered land,
    To contend for the territory of his sons;
    In the expedition which he would make this day,
    And which would be a deed difficult to be performed.
  17. On the stormy surface of the furious ocean
    The vigilant son of Finghin has met
    Hotter trouble in Turkey
    In the fight of the wonderfully armed hosts.
  18. Three ships had this fair-cheeked chieftain,
    Fifty ships had the opposing warriors,
    Behold the horseman of the plain of Cian 373
    Not one of those returned thanks.
  19. In Turkey of the branching tribes
    The beautiful ship of the son of Eibhilin
    Had the track of its breast-plank in the east
    Through the middle of the fleet.
  20. The entire fleet of the harbour
    The heart of Conchobhar did not meditate
    That his speckled ship should shun them;
    Though it was an unequal fight to the stranger.
  21. The large ship he directly steered
    Against the fierce hateful horde;
    The bravery of his valiant heroes in the ships
    Was proved by them on that occasion.
  22.  p.347
  23. By the hand of the hero of the land of Uisneach
    The commander of that fleet fell, 374
    And a battle disproportioned to his few noble men
    Was by him gained on that day.
  24. He sustained at another time
    By the exertions of his valor
    Against the attacks of the fair green land
    The plain of the great festive Flanders.
  25. Rapid wheels that bore good news
    The heir of Ua h-Eidirsgeoil was used to send
    Through Almaine in every direction
    And shrieks of death through the countries around him.
  26. It pleases us that, in the books of the schools,
    It is not any of the kingdom of the Saxons,
    Who obtained the title as a title of fame,
    Who spread a name by these achievements.
  27. Alas for the country wanting the aid
    Of the victorious red hand of Conchobhar;
    Alas for the native land that is deprived
    Of the man of these warlike achievements.
  28. The chief of the clustering locks disliked not
    To scour the coasts of foreign lands,
    Although on his account we have been plundered,
    Yet still shall he not make a descent upon Eire.
  29. The son abroad from his people,
    The father in decrepit age,
    A cause of deadly lamentation to that western land
    Which sheltered the great blood of Maicniadh.
  30.  p.349
  31. The son of Eibhilin of the hot conflicts
    Obtained the great affection of the king of Spain; 375
    He will be therefore hated at this side
    In the holding which he by right perpetually possesses.
  32. The sagacious king yonder of Spain has selected
    One who will humble the might of his foeman;
    Conchobhar is the one he has chosen,
    He is the fulfilment of valor's engagements.
  33. The son of Johanna 376 of the race of heroes
    Is a check upon the achievements of West Munster;
    The scion's wisdom is spread throughout Flann's land,
    Whilst his father's age is extending beyond the boundary.
  34. The manhood of her true love has ended,
    Far from her is the mind of her young son;
    This district has no bond of union,
    Very severe is this affliction which has overtaken it.
  35. The Heavenly King was born
    Of the fruitful illustrious virgin,
    Whose breast-milk he consumed,
    Our salvation through her he worked.
  36. The clustering tendrils of the branch
    Supplied to her its goodly wealth;
    Her fruits like the family branch
    Have come to an ebb with Eibhilin. 377
  37. A host of poets from Snamh-dá-éan 378
    Were used to receive wealth from the daughter of Ellen; 379 p.351
    The school from the ship-abounding Liné 380
    Received wealth from this Mac Carthyan matron.
  38. Graceful hospitality is ministered
    To all who come each night,
    At the quiet banquet of the populous mansion,
    By the placid, generous, cheerful dame.


 p.353

Appendix

I.—3.

Fearfeasa O'Cainte 381 sang this.

  1. By themselves [alone] the Clann Itha 382 make war,
    (Long has the desire of extirpation been
    In their hearts one and all),
    For the sovereignty of the land of Eire.
  2. It not on the Race of Eibhear 383 or Ir 384
    They make war in unpeaceful times,
    The offspring of kings of heavy muster,
    Nor on the great progeny of Eireamhon. 385
  3. These have no other cause
    For checking peace or waging war,
    But to assist the rights of the Race of Lughaidh
    At the powerful incitement of their ollamh. 386
  4. The Race of Ith have the right,
    Many is the cause of their disquietude,
    On account of the harbour-full country of Cobhthach 387 [Ireland]
    Which they won from strangers.
  5. Many a prize, not a trifling prize,
    Many a loss of heroes they sustained
    For the green, bright-hilled, fine country,
    From the adventurers of Crimhthann's Plain [Ireland].
  6.  p.355
  7. Many a beautiful, shamrock-flowering plain,
    Many a noble, bright-shining court,
    [Are lost] from the Race of Ith and in the hands of knights,
    So that it would be a sufficient cause of fury to hear them [numbered.]
  8. Not to rise up in warlike alliance,
    After all the evils which they have sustained,
    The tribe of the land of round-nutted woods;
    'Tis wonderful how long their forbearance.
  9. It is hard if victory they gain not,
    For it is not excessive ambition, it is not injustice,
    That drove this noble tribe of sharp spears
    To take to steps of wars.
  10. ['Twas] their own danger, the fear for their lands,
    That contributed, though long their forbearance,
    ([And] peace not having been spoken of for some time)
    To kindle the fire of the heroes.
  11. Well it becomes the blood of Ith
    To fight battles, to kindle wars,
    For the prize of the land of the nobles
    They were bound to relieve it.
  12. The Race of Ith, who suffer injury,
    Tis' they who have the best right to make battle
    For the smooth, well-placed, far-stretching land
    Of all the Gaeidhil of the land of Felim (Ireland).
  13.  p.357
  14. There is not of them, by the justice of God,
    One to whom the heirship is more fitting,
    To free her mountains, protect her cattle,
    Than the best heir which is of them.
  15. The son of O h-Eidirsceoil, of smooth breast,
    For him it is the most becoming of all the men of Eire,
    To fight for its sake in the battles,
    The land famed for battling and wars.
  16. Conchobhar, heart of a lion,
    Will fight, as for him it is right,
    For the fertile, warm, music-loving land,
    With the old English at the bank of Boinn. 388
  17. Well may they fear, tis God that wills,
    His tribe and Conchobhar,
    Who will extirpate them, no trifling deed,
    For the warlike plain of Felim.
  18. The descendants of Lughaidh 389 will defend,
    In battles and in conflicts,
    Corca-Laidhe 390 of the fine plains,
    A deed which it is most difficult to perform.
  19. It is not more right for them, God has ordained it,
    To fight for Corcach or for Caiseal, 391
    Than to make battle in becoming manner
    For the plain of Teathbha, 392 or for the North.
  20. Or for Nas of Leinster 393 of the warm plains,
    Or for Ath-cliath 394 of breezy harbours, p.359
    Or for the lands of Baei, 395 one and all,
    Or for Cruachain-Aei, 396 or for Aileach. 397
  21. Were a just division made with them,
    With the Race of Ith, who shed crimson blood,
    To them would come the grassy plain of the fair men
    By the judgment of the patron of Eire.
  22. The manner in which they obtained
    The Race of great Lughaidh, son of Ith,
    Right to the great Boinn of Breagh of the banners,
    As an honor beyond the sons of Milidh [Milesius].
  23. From the top of his own fortress 398
    Ith of the sharp-pointed weapons perceived
    Over the great clear calm sea
    The semblance of an island from Spain.
  24.  p.361
  25. Ith, son of Bile, 399 son of Breogan,
    Set out in temperate weather
    With a select party of heroes, of evil,
    To seek for the country which he saw.
  26. No delay happened to his ships
    Until he arrived without much of error,
    [Until] he reached, and it was a perilous adventure,
    The briny harbours of the land of Eire.
  27. He proceeded upon his coming to land
    With a band of heroes, not great in number,
    Firm was their advance as if to give battle
    Unto the sons of Cearmad.
  28.  p.363
  29. About the division of Eire of the sweet grass,
    These sons of Cearmad had come
    To fierce words on either side
    On Ith's arrival at Aileach.
  30. The kings bade him welcome,
    They disclose the cause of their dispute,
    Wisdom had not governed their distribution,
    Until Ith made peace between them.
  31. He bids them farewell after this,
    He takes from them their [good] words,
    From the north, what greater pity,
    They [then] meditated to pursue him.
  32. They considered after disclosing his adventure,
    That his coming to the island was dangerous to them;
    Their children were disgraced by their conspiracy;
    Towards Ith they acted treacherously.
  33. On Magh Itha 400 of the soft pasture
    He is slain by the sons of Cearmad, 401
    Though they exulted having slain him in the conflict,
    It repented them [soon] that they pursued him.
  34. The people of the son of Bile carry
    By force from the stranger tribes,
    (An event from which evil to them all arose,)
    The body of the hero to Spain.
  35. Lughaidh 402 of the ancient swords sets out
    And his relatives the sons of Milidh p.365
    In a compact consecrated host
    To force his eiric from the men of Eire.
  36. On coming to land, what more dangerous exploit;
    After killing the sons of Cearmad
    The fury of the men was not fully abated
    Until they had avenged the death of Ith.
  37. In eiric for him the land remained,
    With them from the Tuatha-De-Danann,
    From thence the race of Ith the fair scion
    Are the chiefs of a cantred of a province.
  38. Therefore they had the best right
    (Until their power was opposed)
    On account of the fair-acred land of the heroes
    To the great evil of [all] Eire.
  39. The eiric of Ith on the land of old Ir,
    Let not the son of Eibhilin forgive;
    From every man it is due to thee
    To obtain thy share of the eiric.
  40. If it be that you seek not
    This eiric from the sons of Milidh,
    If it be compensation to thee for the person slain,
    Let it not go with the foreigners.
  41. O descendant of Ith, son of Bile! 403
    As an eiric from this stranger tribe,
    Take you, one and all,
    Their share of the woody lands of Eire.
  42. Many an eiric besides this,
    Due to thee O heir of Finghin,
    Without denial from the rough hirelings of the English;
    It is a pity to brook the grievance.
  43.  p.367
  44. Much of blood have they shed on the plain,
    Many heroes, who should be lamented,
    They have slain for a long time back
    Throughout the land of the Gaeidhil of the ripe fields.
  45. Spill thou blood for these bloods,
    O hand of battles, O Conchobhar!
    Accept no eiric for them
    But equal slaughter in lieu of them.
  46. Think of the false judgments of the English horde;
    Understand how there is treachery in their friendship;
    A passive secret should not be made of it;
    Think of their enormous slaughters.
  47. If we but continue to beseech her,
    The Virgin who was in poverty,
    (If her heir should refuse us)
    She would raise us to dignity.
  48. A Queenly disposition, without hidden blemish,
    Eibhilin, the daughter of Domhnall 404
    Not one is found unthankful to her,
    Of those who would otherwise abuse her.
  49. From those who cause woman's face to blush 405
    On account of the money which they seek;
    The chosen flower of the family trees,
    Eibhilin is ever free.
  50. A scion of the woods of the blood of Suibhne
    A sprout from the soil of the fertile plain of Modhuirn 406 p.369
    A fruitful plant which distorts not justice,
    The rich bearing tree of the north.
  51. She is sufficiently distinguished from every side
    By her checking of plunder, her hatred of injustice;
    By her serene countenance, which causes the trees
    To bend with fruit; by her tranquil mind.


 p.384

Appendix

I.—5. Of Corca Laidhe, (Laighe, or Laighdhe)Excerpta, Notices of Corca Laidhe and of the family of O'h-Eidirsceoil, anglice O'Driscoll, from the Annals of the Four Masters and the Dublin copy of the Annals of Innisfallen, and various modern authorities

A.D. 352. St. Ciaran, Bishop of Saighir and patron saint of the people of Osraidhe (Ossory) was born in the Island called Cape (Cleire) Clear, a promontory of Corca Laidhe, in the Co. of Cork.—Ann. Innisf.

A.D. 402. Ciaran and Deaglan, two Bishops, came from Rome to preach the Gospel in Ireland. Ciaran after having preached the Gospel in Inis-Cleire and all over Corca-Laidhe founded a Bishop's see at Saighir, in Ossory, and Deaglan also another Bishop's see at Ardmor in the Desies.—Ann. Innisf.

A.D. 600. Died Fachtna first Bishop of Ross-Ailithre in Corca-Laidhe which goes by the additional name of O'Laeghaire of Ross i.e. Corca Laidhe-I-Laeghaire Ruis—Ann. Innisf.

A.D. 746. Flann Fortre, chief of Corca-Laidhe, died.—Annals of the Four Masters.

A.D. 770. Cuchoingealta, lord of Corca-Laidhe, died.—Annals of the Four Masters.

A.D. 800. Maelbracha, son of Breslean, lord of Corca-Laidhe, died.—Annals of the Four Masters.

A.D. 844. Clothnia lord of Corca Laidhe died.—Annals of the Four Masters.

A.D. 860. Bruadar, son of Dunlaing lord of Corca-Laidhe, died.—Annals of the Four Masters.

A.D. 901. Mudan, son of Donnghal lord of Corca-Laidhe, died.—Annals of the Four Masters.

A.D. 942. Finn, son of Matan, lord of Corca-Laidhe, was slain by the Feara-Maighe-Feine.—Annals of the Four Masters.

A.D. 1057. Mughron Ua-Mutain, successor of Bairre noble bishop and lector, was killed by the robbers of Corca-Laidhe after his return from vespers.—Annals of the Four Masters.

A.D. 1058. Mac-na-h-Erlamhe Ua Dunchadha [O'Donohoe] was slain by the Corca-Laidhe.—Annals of the Four Masters.

A.D. 1063. Cathal O'Dunchadha, King of Ui-n-Eathach, and of the south of Ireland, died.—Ann. Innisf.

A.D. 1072. Brodchu, son of Mathghamhain, son of Cian, son of Maelmhuaidh, son of Bran, marched with an army into the Desies from which he carried off much booty and spoil, to recover which he was pursued by the people of Magh  p.385 Feine, and an engagement ensued in which Mudan O'h-Eidirsceoil [O'Driscoll] prince of Corca Laidhe was slain with many others on both sides.—Ann. Innisf.

A.D. 1096. Mathghamhain O'Seaghsa, King of Corca-Laidhe died a penitent.—Ann. Innisf.

A.D. 1104. The son of O'h-Eidirsceoil with twenty-five others went out to sea and never were heard of more.—Ann. Innisf.

A.D. 1154. Amhlaeibh O'h-Eidirsceoil, prince of Cothluighe was slain at the gate of the church of Birr.—Ann. Innisf.

A.D. 1169. Maccon O'h-Eidirsceoil was slain in Mac-Carthaigh's army fighting against Strongbow and his 200 knights and 2000 bowmen at Waterford.—Ann. Innisf.

A.D. 1179. Muircheartach, son of Diarmaid Mor Mac Carthaigh was treacherously slain by O'h-Eidirsceoil at Ros-ailithre.

A.D, 1196. The son of O'h-Eidirsceoil, and Gilla-na-bhflann O'Suileabhain, died.—Ann. Innisf.

A.D. 1212. Aedh Garbh O'h-Eidirsceoil [O'Driscoll] was slain by the O'Ceadagain's.—Ann. Innisf.

A.D. 1215. The English gained great power in Munster. Sleibhne built a castle at Dun-na-ngall in Cothluighe, and another at Dun-na-sead. Barrett built a castle at Traghbhaile and another at Cuan-Dor. Nicholas Boy de Barry built the castles of Tigh-Malaga or Timoleage and Dun-Deide.—Ann. Innisf.

A.D. 1233. Domhnall Got Mac Carthaigh came to dethrone O'Mathghamhain and O'Cobhthaigh.—Ann. Innisf.

A.D. 1235. The English defeated the Irish at Tragh-Li, and Diarmaid, son of Cormac Finn son of Domhnall Mor na Curradh Mac Carthaigh, Gaiscinach O'h-Eidirsceoil [O'Driscoll] together with his brother Muircheartach and many others were slain.—Ann. Innisf.

A.D. 1258. Eoghan mac Muircheartaigh was slain at Dun-na-sead by the English.—Ann. Innisf.

A.D. 1260. The castles of Dun mic Tomain, Dun Insi an duine, Dun-na-nGall, Cuan-Dor, Dun-Deide, Dun Urlaing and Dun Gaill were broken down by Finghin Reanna Roin son of Domhnall Got Mac Carthaigh.—Ann. Innisf.

A.D. 1305. The Castle of Dun-na-sead burned and demolished by Domhnall God Mac Carthaigh, after he had taken it from the English of Desmond.—Ann. Innisf.

A.D. 1302. Finghin O'h-Eidirsceoil and many others of the people of Mac Carthaigh Riabhach were slain.—Ann. Innisf.

A.D. 1409. O'h-Eidirsceoil Og, died.—Annals of the Four Masters.

A.D. 1418. The Bishop O'h-Eidirsceoil, and Maccon O'h-Eidirsceoil, his brother, lord of Corca-Laidhe, died.—Annals of the Four Masters.

A.D. 1419. O'h-Eidirsceoil Mor died.—Annals of the Four Masters.

A.D. 1442. O'h-Eidirsceoil Mor (Maccon), lord of Corca-Laidhe, died.—Annals of the Four Masters.

 p.386

A.D. 146O. A monastery was founded for Franciscan friars in Inis-Arcain in Munster, in the diocese of Ross. Inis-Arcain is in O'h-Eidirsceoil's Country.—Annals of the Four Masters.

A.D. 1472. O'h-Eidirsceoil Mor (Finghin, son of Maccon, son of Maccon son of Finghin, son of Donnchadh God) died in his own house after having performed the pilgrimage of St. James; and his son, Tadhg, died penitently one month after the death of his father, after having returned from the same pilgrimage.—Annals of the Four Masters.

A.D. 1508. O'h-Eidirsceoil, (Conchobhar, son of Finghin son of Maccon) died. He was a brave and protecting man, the friend of the religious orders, and the learned, and his son Finghin was installed in his place, after being liberated, for he had been imprisoned in Cork for more than a year.—Annals of the Four Masters.

Among the “Veteres Iberni qui pro fide Catholica pugnauerunt,” P. O'Sullevan Beare mentions “O'Driscol Cothliae princeps” and “Cornelius O'Driscolis Magni filius.”—Hist. Cathol. Iber. tom III. lib. I. c. I.

A.D. 1585. O'h-Eidirsceoil Mor (Finghin, son of Conchobhar, son of Finghin son of Maccon,) went to Dublin to attend a Parliament there assembled that year.

This Sir Finghin, Finin, or Florence O'Driscoll, “tooke his landes by Letters Pattents from Queen Elizabeth, and thereby extinguished the Irish rite. The former custome was that the eldest of the familie succeeded, unto whome Mac Cartie Reagh did give a rod, and then he was reputed and obeyed as lord of the Countrie of Collimore”—MS. Brit. Mus. Harl. 1425, p. 25.

The island of Cape Cleare also belonged to them; the castle of which place, together with all their other castles, were by Sir Fineene O'Driscoll, delivered up to the Spaniards anno 1601; but were taken by the English two years [recté in a few weeks] after.—Smith's Cork book, I. ch. I.

P. O'Sullevan Beare gives the following account of the conduct of the O'Driscolls at this period, in his History of the Irish Catholics:—
“Zubiaur cum navibus septem, quibus munitiones, et commeatum vehebat, rursus Aquilam secutus juxta Portucastellum (Cuan an Caishlean) non procul a scopulis errans periclitabatur. Tunc temporis ilium locum possidebant, Dionysius, Dermysius, Cornelius, Thadaeus, et Darius O'Driscoles fratres, qui Zubiauri aditum ostenderunt; et Castellum tradiderunt: et cum Dermysius vir prudens, et Latinae linguae non inscius regni statum docuit. Brevi classis reginae optime instructa et militum numero superior portum ingressa Zubiaris naves non ad pugnam satis instructas, sed vectorias, navigatione vexatas, et littori applicatas, atque castellum machinamentis nudum tormentorum ictibus impune verberat, et ipsi Angli in terram descensuri videbantur. Caeterum Zubiaur a Dermysio de rebus egregie edoctus, et impendens sibi periculum praevidens aliter ac Aquila fecit; litteris missis O'Sullevani Bearrae principis auxilium nomine Catholici Regis imploraverat. O'Sullevanus, et pater meus Dermysius,  p.387 qui tunc in Beantria erant, leucas quinque Portucastello, intra horas viginti quatuor post receptas Zubiauris litteras, cum peditibus quingentis, et paucis equitibus electae juventutis illi praesto fuerunt eodem temporis momento, quo Angli in lintres exsiliebant, ut Hispanorum paucitatem terrestri proelio opprimerent. Adfuit etiam Odriscol Magnus cum Cornelio filio et aliis, Odonnobhanus et equites Maccarrhae. Quorum adventu Anglus, territus se navibus continet, et Zubiaur laetus, et confirmatus tormentis ex navibus expositis Anglicam classem biduum acerrime oppugnat. Hic igniti globi vehementissimo sulphuris impetu jacti Anglorum naves a prora ad puppim usque transfodiunt, homines et tabulas in mare propellentes Praetoria navis multis tormentis quassata praecipue conflictatur. In ea primo Zubiauris jactu homines sexaginta, qui mensis discumbebant, extinguuntur. Sequentibus etiam ictibus milites, et nautae passim cadunt. Ob id in eam ex reliquis navibus milites subsidio confluunt. Ea denique pene oppressa, et reliquae turbatae scissis funibus, anchoris relictis fugam capiunt secundo vento leviter inflante, quippe quae adverso coactae tandiu morabantur. Eo proelio succubuerunt Angli quingenti septuaginta quinque. Ex Catholicis unus interficitur Hispanus Zubiauris consanguineus, duo vulnerantur alter Hispanus, alter Ibernus. Hinc Dermysius Osullevanus pater meus Vascum Sahavedram Hispanum ducem cum ejus cohorte ducens, eisque commeatum, et jumenta suppeditans, Dumbeam etiam Bearrae principatus principem arcem et portum Osullevani jussu tradit, et menses circiter duos victum dat eodemque machinamenta, globos aeneos nitratum sulphur, plumbum, bombardicum funem, caeterasque munitiones missis Portucastellum phasellis vehi facit, ut in ilium portum, qui tutus et celeber est, Hispanis navibus aditus pateret, et eo hostiles prohiberentur. Odriscol quoque praesidium Hispanum in portum suum, et castellum ad rem gerendam opportunum intulit.”—Tom III. lib. VI. c. g.

The following is the English account of this affair published in the Pacata Hibernia, book II. c. 18.
“Untill this time [of the arrival of O'Donnell to join the Spaniards] none of the Provincialls of Mounster, that had been either protected, or pardoned, relapsed; but now upon the comming of these seconds to Castlehauen, Sir Finnin O'drischall, and all the O'drischalls, Sir Owen Mac Cartie's sonnes, and almost all the Carties in Carbrie, Donnell O'sulevan Beare, O'sulevan Mores eldest son, Donnell Mac Cartie, the Earle of Clancares base sonne, with all the Carties of Desmond, John O'Connor Kerry, the Knight of Kerry, all the protected and pardoned men in Kerry and Desmond, and all else from Kinsale and Limericke westwards, joyned with O'donnell and the Spainards; whereat little wonder is to be made, considering what power Religion and Gold hath in the hearts of men; both which the Spaniards brought with them into Ireland. The supplies of Spaniards were but seuen hundred, but more were promised to follow; which mooved the wavering Irish to conceive that now the time was come for their deliverance from the English Government; whereupon they cast themselves into the Spanyards' armes, and for testimonie of their truths Donogh O'drischall delivered unto them his castle at Castlehaven, which commanded the harbour. Sir Finnin  p.388 O'drischall (who never in the course of his whole life had been tainted with the least spot of disloyaltie) rendred unto them his castle of Donneshed at Baltimore, and his castle at Donnelong, in the Iland of Inisherkan, betweene which castles all entrance into that haven was debarred; and Donnell O'Sullevan surrendered unto them his strong castle of Dunboy, which absolutely commaunds Beare Haven; these three harbours, beeing without all exception the best in the west of Mounster: For the guard of those places Don John assigned, that one hundred of the late supplies should remaine at Castle-haven, with a Magazine of victualls and Munition, and eight peeces of Ordnance; unto Donneshed and Donnelong hee sent one hundred foot, fiftie for each of the castles, and two peeces of Artillerie; and unto Dunboy hee also sent one hundred foot and ten great peeces: And to confirme these revolters by liberality unto his Master the King of Spain hee bestowed upon Donnell O'Sulevan two hundred foote in the King's pay, unto Donoghe Moyle Mac Cartie, sonne to Sir Owen Mac Cartie Reaghe one hundred, upon Finin Mac Cartie, his brother one hundred and twentie, and upon Phelim Mac Cartie one hundred, and to O'donevan one hundred; in all sixe hundred and twentie in the Kings entertainment; and upon others he bestowed certaine summes of money.” &c. &c.

Again the narrative is continued in c. 19.
“This night late Sir Richard Levison returned into the harbour of Kinsale, and the next day came to the Lord Deputy, unto whom hee imparted that the sixth day, with the Warrespit, the Defiance, the Swiftsure, the Marlin, one Merchant and a carvill, he arrived at Castle-haven about ten of the clock in the fornoone, before four o'clock the same day, one ship of the Enemy was suncke. The Spanish Admirall with nine foote water in hold drove to the shore upon the rocks, the Viceadmirall with two others drove likewise aground, most of the Spaniards quitting their ships; the seventh of December the wind being extreamely at south-east, hee rode still at Castle-haven, the night following, with wind at west-south-west, hee warped out with the ships, the eigth at night he returned as aforesaid.”
“Since wee are informed by the Lord Coursie that they are all sunck but one ship, and great harme done both to their provisions and men.”
“The Spaniards after their comeing to Castle-haven, understanding the Queene's fleet was at Kinsale, expecting their comming thither, to make themselves as strong as they could, landed five peeces of Ordnance which they planted close by the water side for the securing the harbour; but Sir Richard Levison did so ply the shipping, that he suncke and drove ashore as is related, and having effected as much as might be done by sea, was willing to have left the harbour and returne to Kinsale; but the wind being contrary, hee was not able to get forth, but was forced to ride foure and twentie houres within the play of those five peeces of Ordnance, and received in that time above three hundred shot, through hulke mast and tackle, being by no industry able to avoid it, untill some calmer weather came where by the helpe of some warpes layed forth by their boats, not without great danger and some loss (575!) he came to set sail and returned  p.389 to Kinsale. All the shot were made particularly at his ship, except some few at a Pinnace of the Queenes, wherein Captaine Flemming was commander.” Shortly afterwards the Irish Catholics were defeated at Kinsale.

The next notice of an O'Driscoll is found in O'Sullevan Beare's History of the Irish Catholics, tom III, lib. VII. cap. 1.
“Post foedus Aquilae Osullevanus in Hispaniam mittit Dermysium Odriscolem probatae fidei et prudentiae virum [filius erat Cornelii, filii Florentii, O'Driscolis Magni patruelis] celerem opem rogatum, et Danielem filium suum natu maximum paternae fidei pignus et obsidem. Quibus cum una ego quoque puer, et alii juvenes nobiles venientes a Carazenae comite Galletiae praefecto viro vetusta nobilitate claro, et in Ibernicam gentem maxime pio honorificentissime sumus excepti. Ubi ego Patricio Sinoto (Patric og Sinot) populari meo, grammatico et rhetorico polito, et limato Latinae linguae, Rotherico Vendanna Hispano ingenii acutissimi philosophiae, sed aliis aliarum doctrinarum praeceptoribus sum usus. Interim Osullevanus omni ratione, et studio conandum putavit, ut usque ad Hispani auxilii adventum se, et eos, quos Hispanorum partes sequendas moverat ab hostis impetu defenderet. Ei auxilium ferunt Daniel Maccarrha, Clancarrhae principis filius, Daniel, Osullevani Magni filius, Cornelius et Dermysius, Odriscolis Magni filii, Dermysius, Osullevanus pater meus, Dermysius, duo Dionysii, et Florentius Maccarrhas Fusci, equites Macsuinnii, Dionysius Odriscol cum suis fratribus. Ad eum confugiunt Oconchur Kierrius, Macmoris Lacsnaae Baro, eques auratus Kierrius, eques Auratus Vallis. Johannes Giraldinus comitis frater. Jaimus Buttlerus baronis Catharae frater superiore bello suis possessionibus ejecti. Osullevanus Gulielmo Burko, Richardo Tirello, et aliis conductis obaeratorum delectu conscripto, et sociorum auxiliis millia militum circiter duo juventutis electae comparat. Quibus ea hyeme Torrentirupem (Carraig an-eas-aig) arcem, quam solam in Beantria tenebat Engenius Osullevanus semper reginae partes secutus, partim aggere, turribus, vineis, musculis, pluteis oppugnatam, partim aeneis tormentis quassatam in suam potestatem redegit. Odonnobhanum ad Anglos reversum, et alios Anglorum auxiliares depraedatur. Regias copias, quae in Momoniis erant, terrore perculsas in oppida munita, et arces compellit.” tom III, lib. VII, c. i.

“Eisdem diebus, quibus arx Dumbea oppugnatur, Eugenius Osullevanus et Johannes Bostokus Anglus in Beam insulam [Dursey Island] navibus vehuntur, in qua erat monasterium a Bonaventura Episcopo Hispano extructum, sed a piratis dirutum, templum sancto Michaeli-Archangelo dicatum, et Castellum a patre meo Dermysio conditum, quod pauci milites Cornelii Odriscolis praesidio tenebant.” tom III, lib. VII, c. 3.

“Per eosdem dies, quibus Osullevanus has clades [Dunbei arcis et Beae insulae castelli excidium] recipit, Dermysius Odriscol ex Hispania reversus Osullevano tradit a Catholico Rege viginti millia nummorum aureorum in militum stipendium, litteras, quibus auxilium promittitur, et aliquas munitiones. Post vero  p.390 amissam arcem Osullevanus Cornelium Odriscolem, Odriscolis Magni filium, in Hispaniam mittit celeriorem opem efflagitatum.” tom III, lib. VII, c. 4.

“Of the money sent on this occasion Sir Finnin O'Driscoll and his son Connor or Cornelius received £500.”—Pacata Hibernia b. II, c. 7.

“Cum Cerda Maculliamus in Hispaniam se confert; ubi brevi moritur. Eodem quoque tempore Cornelius Odriscol, quem in Hispaniam ab Osullevano missum fuisse docuimus, acceptis a rege Catholico duobus millibus aureorum in Momonias applicat. Ubi cum Osullevanus non esset in Hispaniam revertitur, uxorem suam et alias foeminas devehens.” Tom III, lib. VIII. c. 3.

It appears from a letter of the Lord Deputy and Council written on the 20th of March 1601-2 to the Lords in England that Sir Finnin O'Driscoll, the O'Donovan, and the two sons of Sir Owen Mac Carthy had joined the English.
“As for Sir Finnin O'drischall, O'donnevan and the two sonnes of Sir Owen Mac Cartie, they and their followers, since their coming in, are growne very odious to the Rebels of those parts, and are so well divided in factions among themselves, as they are fallen to preying and killing one another, which we conceive will much availe to the quieting of these parts.”—Pacata Hibernia b. 2, c. xxx.

Again it appears from the following passage in the Instructions given to the Earl of Thomond on the 9th of March, 1601-2, that O'Driscoll was received into favor by the English Government.
“The service you are to perform is, to doe all your endeavours to burne the rebels' corne in Carbery, Beare, and Bantry, take their cowes, and to use all hostile prosecution upon the persons of the people, as in such cases of rebellion is accustomed.”
“Those that are in subjection, or lately protected (as Odrischall, Odonevan, and Sir Owen Mac Cartie's sonnes,) to afford them all kind and mild usage.” Pacata Hibernia, book 3, ch. II.

Dr. Smith writes, on what authority the Editor knows not, that “in order to ingratiate himself with Queen Elizabeth, a fleet of English ships of war were supplied, for a considerable time with fresh provisions, by this Sir Fineene O'Driscoll, who also nobly entertained all the Captains, and other officers in his castles.” That, “the Queen being informed of it, pardoned his joining the Spaniards, and sent for him to court.” But, that “before he arrived the Queen died.” That “during his absence, great part of his possessions were intruded into by Sir Walter Coppinger, which caused this ancient family to fall to decay.” Book I, ch. I.

The truth is, however, that Sir Finghin let Baltimore and the whole of Collymore territory to a certain Thomas Crooke for 21 years, for a fine of £2000, Sterling, and that he thus, probably, laid the foundation of a forfeiture. See Smith's Cork, Book 2, ch. IV. His son Cornelius, by Ellen, daughter of Sir Owen Mac Carthy Reagh, was a captain in the archduke's country. His grandson, another Cornelius, an Ensign in the Spanish navy, was killed in an engagement  p.391 of the Spanish fleet with the Turks in the Mediterranean, of which P. O'Sullevan Beare gives the following account in his letter to Diarmaid O'Sullevan Beare, written in April, 1619, and published in the first Edition of his History of the Irish Catholics, but by some oversight omitted in the second Edition.
“Illustrissimo Domino Dermysio O'Sullevano Dumbeae Comiti, Philippus O'Sullevanus, S.P.D.”
“In Catholici Regis classem cum venissem, nihil antiquius habui, quam ut diligentissime inquirerem, quemadmodum consanguinei tui, (clarissime Dermysi) mortem oppetiverint, teque facerem certiorem. Quod ut exactius intelligatur de rebus gestis regiae classis aestate superiore pauca breviter perstringenda sunt. Anno post Virgineum partum millesimo sexcentesimo decimo octavo quinto Nonas Maii (qui dies inventae salutiferae crucis nomine in fastos relatus est) regiae naves novem Ulyssipone solvunt, Praetore Vidasavale Cantabro, Propraetore Johanne Ludovico Camarena, militum praefecto Ferdinando Luna. Dies aliquot adversis ventis usae Mediterraneum mare ingrediuntur. Ubi pridie Kalend. Junii, qui dies Petronillae Virginis morte celebratur, duae Poenorum naves bellicae Propraetorias nostrae, qua Camarena cum una Hispanorum cohorte, et Cornelius nostras Odriscol vir intrepidus cum altera Ibernorum electae juventutis ferebatur, fiunt obviae. Cum ambabus Propraetoria ab hora sexta pomeridiana usque in sequentem lucem per lucidam, atque serenam noctem tormentorum flammivomorum, atque bombardarum jactibus acriter dimicat, et minorem capit: hostibus sexaginta quinque in deditionem acceptis, et tribus proelio peremptis. Altera tormentariis ictibus labefactata, et confossa pelago obruitur. Ex nostris quatuor Hispani periere. Postero die duabus navibus simul cum Afris propugnatoribus ad Hispanam oram, et alia ad Africum littus a defensoribus deserta nostri potiuntur. Brevi naves tres ex Cantabria nostris subsidio venerunt. Ita naves Hispanse erant numero duodecim, quibus milites circiter octingenti, sub ducibus septem, et nautae quadringenti plus, minus vehebantur. Octavo Kalendas Julii (quo in honorem nati divi Johannis Baptistae festum agitur) a nostris excubitoribus naves viginti quatuor secundo vento venientes, Mediterranei pelagi fauces intrare conspiciuntur. His praeter nautas, et classiarios vehebantur duo millia, et quadringenti milites qui a Venetis erant acciti ex Anglia et Batavia contra Ferdinandum Archiducem. Eis ut aditum intercluderent, nostri erant jussi a Thoma Ibio Calderone regiae classis summo quaestore, qui tunc Gadibus erat. Neque procul in stationibus aberant Batavi senatus naves octodecim duce Muillo Lombardo, quae suis, si pugnae periclitarentur, opem laturae a nostris credebantur. Nihilominus Hispani proelium audacter ineunt. Ab hora secunda pomeridiana in noctem usque utrinque strenue et magnanime pugnatur, donec a Duce Mitinae Sidoniae misso phasello venientes aditu non prohibere nostri fuerint jussi. Eo die ex nostris sexaginta quinque, et inter eos Augustinum Ogedam et Martium Sclavum Italum cohortium duces, ex hostibus centum octodecim jacuisse traditur.”
“Priusquam Vidasaval Ulyssipone discessit, Tabaccus Arracs classem navium  p.392 viginti octo Saldis, vel Argelia ducens Ombrium, vel Lanzerotam unam ex Fortunatis insulis invadens, totam depraedatur, et devastat; domamque repetens Hispanis captivis, et opibus onusta classe cum ad Mediterranei maris augustias appropinquasset, naves octo duce Propraetoria praemittit. Eis praeerat Arraes Tagarinus Mauriscus magna audacia, et rei bellicae nauticaeque scientia. Quibus sexto Nonas Juiii, qui dies in memoriam Visitationis Virginis Matris festus colitur, Hispanae duodecim, et Batavae quatuordecim occurrunt. Hispana praetoria unam facile subigit. Propraetoria Hispana Turcicam Propraetoriam, quae septem comitibus praeerat, aggreditur. Erat Turcica magna tormentis multis, et centum octoginta propugnatoribus instructa. Vehemens utrinque pugna committitur tormentariis machinamentis, atque bombardis. Cum ambae cohaesissent nostri in hostilem insilire non ambigunt. Antonius Camarena Propraetoris fratris sui signifer animosus juvenis stricto gladio, scutoque laevae imposito dum ad saltum se componit, plumbea pilura confossus sternitur. Illi successit Daniel Osullevanus, frater meus, qui ducebat Ibernorum manipulum, adolescens specie pulcher, miris viribus praeditus, pugilandi scientiae peritus: quas corporis virtutes ingentis animi magnitudine superabat, insuper Latini sermonis non ignarus, neque Philosophiae et Dialecticae rudis. Superioribus dimicationibus magnam virtutem praestiterat, cum commilitones cohortando, tum per se fortissime proeliando. Sed (proh dolor!) casus infestus tulit, ut immatura morte praeventus pauciora suae fortitudinis, et magnanimitatis exempla reliquerit. Namque jam jam salturus bombardica glande pectus trajectus supra Antonium Camarenam cadit, proferens tantum illa salutifera verba Jesus, Maria. Paucis ante diebus Ulyssipone profecturus a peccatis expiatus sacrosanctum corpus Christi Domini sumpserat. Philippus Osullevanus patruelis meus, qui rara corporis agilitate, saltandique dexteritate praestabat, in Poenorum navim prosiluit, ita corpore librato, ut se pedibus exceperit. Ubi stricto ferro cum pluribus coepit intrepide contendere, et magna caesa vulneratus, nihilominus pugnam non remisit. Confluentibus in subsidium Christianis Mauri virtute cedunt, et simul Turcica navis ignem, vel casu, vel alicujus opera concipit. Qua flagrante Christiani et Poeni confusi et mixti partim properant in Hispanam navim se conferre, partim ingenti pavore perculsi flammae vim fugientes, in salum se praecipites dant. Philippus cum paucis, quos cohortando confirmavit, ad extinguendum ignem sese convertit. Qua spe cum decidisset corporis parte combustus antennam in mare projicit, cui innixus cum commilitonibus quindecim ad suam navim conatur adnare, sed frustra, nam undae vi rapitur. Neque ei nostri potuerunt subvenire, quia ex Turcica navi in nostram incendium fuit subito diffusum. Quo repentino malo territi alii ad poenitentiarii pedes se poplitibus excipiunt, peccatorum expiationem petentes: alii elata voce crimina sua pronunciant: aliqui se in pelagus projiciunt. Cornelius Odriscol dux, vir semper animo magno incendium reprimere nititur, alios exemplo, et cohortatione movens. Quo munere occupatus, cum ei nunciaretur, Cornelium filium signiferum periisse, “is,” inquit, “est mihi nunc  p.393 filius, qui ad extinguendam flammam, et regiam navim liberandam opem tulerit.” Ita potissimum fortissimi viri opera ignis extinguitur nostrae navis prora ad aquam usque pene combusta, et Christiani liberantur praeter eos, qui proeliantes ceciderunt, et paucos, qui se in mare projecerunt, Poenique centum septemdecim qui in eam sua combusta se receperunt una cum duce suo Tagarino et captivis Christianis septem, inter quos erat gravida foemina. Caeteri Christiani captivi ad numerum nonaginta, cum nostram navim nando nancisci non potuissent, cum Afris aliquot obruuntur. Ex Ibernis nobilibus praeter Danielem, Philippum et Cornellum signiferum magnae indolis juvenem consanguinitate etiam mihi conjunctum, succubuerunt hoc proelio Daniel Maccarrha, Cornelius Orrellus, Gulielmus Giraldinus, et Johannes Plunketus. Interim aliae quinque Turcicae naves non tanto discrimine capiuntur. Octava fugit, quam secutae duae Hispanae, sed non assecutae aliam Mauram obviam factam expugnant. Postero die sequuntur aliae tredecim naves ex Tabacci classe, quarum quinque Christiani in suam potestatem redegerunt. Eo toto biduo naves tredecim Afris adimuntur, ex quibus Batavi sex, Hispani reliquas ceperunt. Poeni quingenti in servitutem redacti, plures ferro, et aqua deleti: captivi circiter trecenti in libertatem asserti: Christiani centum, plus minus, desiderati.”
“Haec ab hominibus fide dignis accepi, quae de rebus regiae classis te docerem. Eis liquet quam honorifice, et gloriose consanguinei tui diem suam clauserint! Quod nobis magno levamini doloris esse debet.”—Hist. Cathol. Iber. fol. 264, 266.

The following Extracts from the Liber Tenurarum for the Province of Munster,—in the Office of the Chief Remembrancer, Dublin,—will show other branches of this family who had property in Collymore at this period.

Finin Mc. Donogh O'Driscoll, tenant of four gneeves of land, and half a gneeve, lying on the western part of the town and lands of Farrencoushe, in the County aforesaid [Cork].

Held of the Lord the King by the fortieth part of one Knight's fee. By an Inquisition after the death of Donat Mc. ffinin O'Driscoll, 12th April, 1631, delivered Easter. 1631, roll 15.

Donat O'Driskoll, Tenant of the Castle, Town, and Lands of Donelonge, containing 3 carrucates of land, one carucate and the third part of a carucate in Sleamore, half a carucate in Glan-Iragh in the Island of Cape Cleere, half a carucate of Gortidroghide in the Island of Donegall.

Held of the Lord the King in Capite by military service, but by what part of a Knight's fee the Jurors are ignorant. Livery sued 26th November, 1629, by order, Hilary, 1632, roll 26.

Donat Carragh O'Driskoll, tenant of the Castle and two carucates of Donegall, two carucates of Gorticlosca, two carucates of Glane Ireragh in the Island of Capecleere, nine gneeves of land of Gokane.

Held of the Lord the King in Capite by military service, namely, by the third part of one Knight's fee. By Inquisition post mortem of Fynen O'Driscoll, 16th September, 1631, roll 13, delivered Easter, 1632.

 p.394

There is an Inquisition taken in the County of Cork in the reign of James the first, relating to Teig Mc Conoghure O'Driscoll of Glanbarryhane, a rebel, who paid rent to Lord Mc Carthy Rioghe and Dermod Mc Conoghure O'Driscoll. [of. ch. Rem. Dublin].

Inrolment on the Memoranda Roll 5 James I. m. 72, relating to Dermod O'Driscoll and Donnell O'Driscoll.

Inrolment on the Memoranda Roll of Cromwell, Roll I., relating to Donoghue Driscoll of Bally Island Co. Cork.

The following persons of the name of O'Driscoll are mentioned in the family documents of the O'Donovan at Montpellier in the County of Cork, who writes (December 5th, 1850) I have the “fee of three ploughlands in Creagh and Tullagh parishes, which were once part of the O'Driscoll territory, in Carbery, and appear, by the many deeds which I have, dating from 1629 to 1677, to have passed from them to my ancestor, Teige, his executor and brother, Morogh, and Teige's surviving son, Morogh. The names of the lands are Lick, Bunlick, Gortshanecrone, Knockvallytaggart, Ardagh, two ploughlands, and Ballinard, the third. The first seem to have belonged to one family, and I select at foot such names from the deeds as occur, and do the like by the second. You have every O'Driscoll name in them that occurs in my family documents.” List, &c., Ardagh.

1. Teige Mac Moriertagh O'Driscoll, of Gurtshanecrone, (a marksman) to Teige O'Donovane, of Drishane, 12th March, 1632.

2. Daniell Mac Dermodie Driscoll, of Ardagh (marksman), to Teige O'Donovan, of Drishane, 16th October, 1632.

3. Teige Mac Moriertagh O'Driscoll, of Gortshanecrone (marksman), to Teige O'Donovan, of Rahine, 2nd November, 1632.

4. Dermod Mac Ffynyne O'Driscoll, of Cnockvollytaggart (marksman), to Teige O'Donovan of Drishane, 6th June, 1633.

5. Florence O'Driscoll, of Bally Illand, to Teige O'Donovan, of Drishane, 17th June, 1633.

6. Daniell Mac Dermodie Mac Donagh O'Drishcoll, of Ardaghmaggeanie, to Morrogh O'Donovan, of Carragarruffe, 3rd October, 1643.

7. Manan Mac Teige Mac Dermodie Driscoll (marksman), to Morrogh O'Donovan, of Carruggarruffe, 31st October, 1640.

8. Lease of 20th April, 1664, by Morrogh O'Donovan, of Drishane, to Donagh Mac Daniell Driscoll, of the parish of Tullagh.

Touching Ballynard, in Tullagh parish.

1. Cnoghor Oge O'Driscoll, of Ballynard, to Teige O'Donovane, of Drishane, 12th December, 1629.

2. Cnoghor Oge O'Driscoll, and Donogh Mac Cnoghor O'Driscoll, son and heir of said Cnoghor, of Ballynard, to Teige O'Donovane, of Drishane, 9th December, 1635.

3. Same to same, 12th May, 1638.

 p.395

4. Donnagh Mac Cnoghor Oge O'Driscoll, of Ballynard, to Morrogh, Mac Teige O'Donovane, of Drishane, llth December, 1664.

5. Deed of sale of Ballynard by same to same, styled of Letterlickey, in Durrus parish, 1st May, 1670.

6. Bond of same to same, 19th September, 1670.

7. “Obligation of Morrogh Mac Teige O'Donovane, at the entreatie, &c., of Daniel O'Donovane, alias O'Donovane, Esq., Coll. Cornelius O'Driscoll, Ffynyne O'Mahowny, of Ardryrynggie, from Wm. Goghin and from John Coghlane, to restore Ballynard to Donogh Mac Cnoghor O'Driscoll, in case of, &c. &c. (not dated nor executed, but would appear from the rest, to be about latter end of 1670.)”

On the llth of July, 1650, F. O'Driscoll entered into a covenant with Donough Mac Daniel Carthy and O'Donovan, reciting—
“For as much as it is thought convenient and necessary that friends and neighbours in those more than troublesome times, should joyne and unit their helping hands together, to withstand and resist all insolencies and annoyances that should invade either by their enemyes, back friends, or any other: wee therefore, the undernamed, doe, by these presents, covenant and faithfully promise, and thereupon ingage our honesties to the utmost of our power, to be ayding and assisting one to another in maintaining, uphoulding, and defending our lives, estates, and goods whatsoever, against all person and persons that would intend or act any violence, oppression, or any other unlawful prejudice unto any or either of us, or that would incroach upon any of the respective cantridges of Clan-Cahill or Clandermod, and Collimore, or any other, of our rights or intrests whatsoever: further, it is faithfully promised and agreed upon betwixt us, the undernamed, that if any or either of us would conceave or apprehend any cause of jealousie or suspition of imperformance of this covenant, that it shall not be a breach hereof, but rather to be reconciled by the major vote of the undernamed not concerned in that cause of jealousie, if any be; this tending to a faire correspondencie betweene us in the three cantridges before mentioned: and for the due performance hereof wee have heereunto subscribed our hands the llth of July, 1650. Moreover, it is agreed upon and faithfully promised by and betweene us, that noe person or persons shall or may have command over our men in armes, or to be in armes, without our approbation, or the approbation of the major parte of us, if we may from our superiours obtaine it; moreover, that any officer or officers voted and named by us may not exact, prejudice, or charge any or either of us, nor proceed in any thing wherein wee may bee concerned, without the consent of us, or the major parte of us: and for the better performance heereof wee have taken our oathes upon the holy Evangelists, as witness our hands, the llth of July, 1650.”

DANIKLL O'DONOVAN.
DONNOGH MAC DANIELL CARTHY.
F. O'DRISCOLL.

 p.396

That this family continued to be highly respectable and important, in Ireland, not only after the Cromwellian Usurpation, but till the Revolution, is evident from various records and historical authorities. It appears from King Charles II.'s letter in favor of Col. Daniel O'Donovan that there was a Col. O'Driscoll in the royal service in Cromwell's time. This letter recites: “That Daniell O'Donovane of Castle O'Donovane in the County of Corke, in our kingdome of Ireland, submitted unto the peace concluded in our said kingdome in the year One Thousand Six Hundred and Forty-eight, and constantly adhered thereunto contributing his best endeavours to advance it, and suppress all oppositions that might be thereunto given, signally testifying upon all occasions his loyalty and fidelity to our service; and that he raised at his own cost and charge by Commission from the said Duke of Ormond then our Lieutenant of Ireland, two foote Companies, whereof one was commanded, as Captaine, by Morrogh O'Donovane, his brother in the regiment of Colonel Hennessy, under the command of our said Lieutenant of Ireland, at the seidge of Dublin, where the said Captaine Morogh O'Donovane was killed in our service. And that Richard O'Donovane retired himself and company into forreigne partes, and there was also killed in our service, when hee had first, as Captaine of the other foote Companie in Colonell O'Driscoll's Regiment, contributed his best endeavours for the furtherance of our service, till the late usurped power became prevalent in our said kingdome of Ireland; and that Daniell O'Donovane persevering still constant in his loyalty to us, the said usurped power seized upon all his Estate, burning, killing, and destroying all that came in their way, and blew up with powder two of his the said Daniell's Castles.”

There is a well preserved copy of this letter in the possession of Edward Powell Esq. of Bawnlahan, in the county of Cork, and another in the Chief Remembrancer's Office, Dublin (Adventurers' Certificates Roll xviii.)

Soon after the levying of Col. Daniel O'Donovan's Regiment of infantry for the war of the Revolution was commenced, Cornelius O'Driscoll is mentioned as its intended Lieutenant Colonel. In Col. O'Donovan's papers connected with the above regiment there is a Capt. Driscoll mentioned more than once.

“On the 2nd. of October, 1690, the Lord Marlborough came to Kinsale with the army; on the 3rd, Major General Tettau and Colonel Fitzpatrick, with about 800 men, got over in boats unperceived near Ringroan Castle, marched down towards the old fort (called Castle-ni-Park) which they boldly assaulted, and took by storm, whereupon the enemy retired into the Castle, but at the same time 3 barrells of their powder took fire at the gate and blew it up, with about 40 soldiers. At length, the Governor Colonel Driscoll and 200 of the garrison being killed, the rest surrendered upon quarter.” Cox's Narration quoted by Smith in his Natural and Civil History of Cork, book 3. c. VII.

“November 23rd, 1690, an attack was made by a Jacobite party of 500 men under the young Colonel O'Driscoll on Castletown House, near Castlehaven, the mansion house of Colonel Townshend, which they attempted to burn; but  p.397 they missed of their aim, and were so well received by Townshend and his garrison, that twelve of them dropt at the first volley, and upon a second Col. O'Driscoll, and Captain Teige Donovan, Captain Cronin, and about 30 others were slain, and so many more wounded that they were forced to retire.” Ibid.

In French accounts of the Irish Brigades in the possession of John Cornelius O'Callaghan, Esq. Dublin, the Sieur Corneille or Cornelius O'Driscoll is spoken of as a distinguished officer in Spain in 1707 and 1708, or during the great war of the Succession, when he was Lieutenant Colonel to the Regiment of Dragoons of the famous Count Daniel O'Mahoni. In a hostile sally from Alcoy, January 2nd 1708, it is said that le Sieur Corneille Odriscol, Lieutenant Colonel du Regiment de O'Mahoni, fut blessé au pied dangereusement.

The following brief notice of the present condition of the O'Driscoll tribe is abstracted from a paper on the subject written by Rickard Donovan Esq. Clerk of the Crown for the County of Cork.
“The family of O'Driscoll having fallen into decay and lost every portion of their former possessions, it is not easy now to ascertain satisfactorily who is the head of that Clan. Most of this ancient sept may now be discovered in bitter contests with the overseers of the work-houses of Skibbereen and Skull, who are more keenly anxious as to the minimum rate of food to keep alive the animal man, than the oldest and most calculating political economist of the day. From these paupers who most submissively exclaim that their present abject condition is wholly to be attributed to the will of God, no information can be obtained, except a vague tradition about Sir Fineen O'Driscoll having entertained the officers of Queen Elizabeth's fleet at his Castle at Baltimore. However, the head of the race, I believe, lately existed in the person of Mr. Michael O'Driscoll of Baltimore, who, born only to the repute of being an Irish chief, connected himself in marriage with the daughter of a namesake [of Mr. Timothy O'Driscoll and sister of the late Alexander ODriscoll esq. J.P.] by whom he got some money, by means of which he advanced himself in the world, and even became a justice of the peace, but Lord Manners swept him out of that distinction with some half dozen other Roman Catholics in the county of Cork, who had stolen into that dignity owing to some good-natured oversight in the preceding chancellor.”
“This gentleman died about twenty years ago, leaving no male descendant. He had three daughters, of whom two died unmarried, and one, Eliza, was married to James O'Brien, esq, a coroner of the County of Cork, who died leaving one son Fitzjames O'Brien, who is now twenty-one years of age, and living at Castleconnell, in the county of Limerick. This Mr. Michael O'Driscoll, or 'the O'Driscoll' as he was called, had a brother, who early in life having to seek his fortune in the English Colonies, was satisfied to leave the hereditary honors to his brother, and styled himself 'William Driscoll,' thinking, no doubt, that his fortune would not be much improved by taking the O. On the death of his brother however he styled himself the O'Driscoll. He is still living [in the 84th year of his age] and has one son William Henry O'Driscoll. This  p.398 gentleman is now the head of the ancient family of the O'Driscolls, and though unconnected with the Clan, he adheres to the religion, and feelings of his ancestors.”—R. Donovan.

He claims descent from Donogh O'Driscoll who married Mary, daughter and heir at law of Gerald, 19th Baron of Kinsale, who died about the year 1642; but his pedigree has not been yet satisfactorily proved by the evidence of authentic documents. The following is furnished by Miss Mary Jane Freke of Baltimore Castle, whose mother is an O'Driscoll, and William Henry O'Driscoll of Stoke near Plymouth, the only son of the O'Driscoll.

1. FLORENCE O'DRISCOLL of Ballyisland, (son of Coll. Cornelius, son of Donogh, chief of his name.) He was born about the year 1677, and married in 1706 the daughter of O'Donovan, by whom he had two sons, 1. Denis, who succeeded him as head of the sept, and 2. William O'Driscoll, from whom the late Daniel Mac Carthy of Gortnascreena, was descended in the female line. He married, secondly, a Miss Fitzgerald, by whom he had also two sons, 1. Michael, who married Miss Honora Morris, daughter of Mr. Samuel Morris of Skibbereen, surveyor of Excise, by Sarah, eldest daughter of Colonel Daniel O'Donovan of Bawnlahan, M.P. but who died without issue; and 2. Cornelius O'Driscoll, of Florence Court and Riverview, surnamed “the Admiral,” on account of his attachment to naval sports, who left one daughter, the wife of the late Dr. Power of Clonakilty, uncle to the present Dr. Power, M.P. for the County of Cork.

2. DENIS O'DRISCOLL of Creagh Court. He was born in the year 1707, and married three wives but had issue by the second only, namely, Martha O'Hea, daughter of O'Hea of Kilkern, by Mary O'Grady, daughter of the O'Grady of Kilballyowen in the County of Limerick. His children were, I. Matthias who was born in 1754: he settled in America, where he married, and had issue one son Denis, who was shot in a duel, and three daughters who are still living; II. Michael O'Driscoll of Baltimore, born in 1764, commonly called “THE O'DRISCOLL,” who married Miss Helena O'Driscoll of Lakeland, daughter of Timothy O'Driscoll, Esq. J.P. and sister of Alexander O'Driscoll, Esq. J.P. and had issue Denis O'Driscoll, who died without issue, and three daughters, Helena, Eliza, and Jane, who are all dead without issue, except Eliza who married, 1. James O'Brien, Esq. Coroner of the County of Cork, by whom she had one son Michael Fitzjames O'Brien, now living; and 2ndly, De Courcy O'Grady, Esq. of Castleconnell, in the County of Limerick. III. William O'Driscoll, now the O'Driscoll, of whom presently, and IV. Cornelius O'Driscoll, who settled in America, and became an officer in the United States' Navy, in which service he died, leaving one legitimate son, William Cornelius O'Driscoll, now living at Charleston, and having legitimate issue male, who will probably become the future representatives of the family. Denis O'Driscoll had a daughter, Lucy, who married John O'Grady, Esq., of Castlefarm, in the County of Limerick.  p.399 He died in 1792, aged 85 years.

3. WILLIAM O'DRISCOLL, now THE O'DRISCOLL. He was born on the 6th of June, 1766; and he married, in August, 1802, Mary Raby, of Kingsland, in the county of Middlesex, by whom he had issue, William Henry O'Driscoll, of whom presently, and one daughter, Mary, who was born on the 6th of August, 1805, and died on the 9th of December, 1833.
This gentleman, during the lifetime of his brother Michael, wrote his name William Driscoll, but after his death assumed the O', and began to call himself the O'Driscoll. He entered the British navy in 1782, in which he served for some time under his relative, the Honorable Captain de Courcy, who had command of the Wizard sloop. He afterwards commanded the Devonshire, 20 guns, but left the service, and next commanded an Indiaman, in which service his son, William Henry, was actively employed for several years.
This O'Driscoll (William, son of Denis, son of Florence), who is now living, was in his youthful days a most magnificent specimen of the old Irish chieftain race, having been “mighty of limb and strong of sinews, very tall and bread in proportion; of noble countenance, and in pitch of body like a giant.”

4. WILLIAM HENRY O'DRISCOLL, Esq., of Stoke, near Plymouth. He was born on the 16th of June, 1803, and, though a fine specimen of the old Irish chieftain race, he is still unmarried. The senior line of the O'Driscolls is, therefore, likely to become extinct in the British Islands, and the genealogist of the next century will probably have to look for it in the United States of America: though, according to a wild tradition in the country, there are fishermen on Cape Clear and on other islands off the Coast of Carbery, who are lineally descended from the youngest son of Sir Finghin, or Florence, of 1602. The Rev. James O'Driscoll, P.P. of Kilmichael in the County of Cork, is said to be the great-grandson of Denis O'Driscoll of Dunbeacon Castle, who is remembered by tradition for his skill in performing on the Irish harp, who was the son of Florence O'Driscoll, called the Captain Cam, who was killed at the siege of Dunboy in 1602. Sed cum de his nihil certi scio, nihil etiam assertive determino.

Cornelius O'Driscoll, the father of Florence O'Driscoll, No. 1 supra, had a son Alexander, who married Mary O'Sullivan, daughter of Mac Fineen Duff, by Mary Mac Gillicuddy, of the Reeks, from whom descended the Mount Musick branch of the O'Driscolls, and (according to Miss Freke of Baltimore Castle) the late Alexander O'Driscoll, whose sister, Mrs. Freke, of Baltimore Castle, is still living.

“John O'Driscoll, late Judge of the Island of Dominica was a native of the city of Cork. He inherited a small property acquired by the industry of his parents who kept a shop in Cork, and educated him well. He published in 1823 Views in Ireland, in two volumes, and in 1827 a History of Ireland in two volumes, works of considerable reputation. He died in June, 1828, whilst in his judicial appointment which he obtained through the patronage of the Marquis of Landsdowne. Mr. Windele, of Cork, lias a large collection of his papers.”

 p.400

“The late Alexander O'Driscoll, Esq., J.P., of Norton Cottage, Skibbereen, was the son of Timothy Driscoll, commonly called Tim the Guager, who was in appearance far beyond the ordinary run of men, being remarkably handsome, tall, and athletic, appearing like the son of a giant. This Timothy was, no doubt, of ancient respectable descent; but nothing seems to have been known in the country of his pedigree. He acquired considerable property as a middleman, and was a magistrate of no ordinary capacity; he was a jovial companion, had a good head, and was a kind of sense-carrier to several of his aristocratic neighbours, who had no time for anything but drinking and hunting. His son, Alexander, succeeded to a considerable property in land and tithes. This Alexander (whatever his lineage may have been and his bearing, his virtues and vices all denote that he was of no common ancestry), may be considered as the last celebrated man of the O'Driscolls in the O'Driscoll territory. He was a remarkably fine looking man; he looked, in fact, like a prince; hunted well; rode and shot well; drank well: his hospitality was boundless to all. Being in politics a high Conservative, his popularity lay with the aristocracy, who repaid him for his hospitality by giving him all those posts of honor which gentry sigh for, and which cost nothing. He was of overbearing disposition; despised all popular institutions; was severe to the peasantry, and no favorite with the Roman Catholic clergy, although a Roman Catholic himself. His end was most melancholy. In the summer assizes of 1849 he served on the county grand jury, although his embarrassments were notorious; and, instead of proceeding homewards after the duties of a grand juror were over, he remained in the city of Cork, and was arrested by a wine merchant. He applied for his discharge on the score of being on duty as a grand juror; but the application was refused, and he was confined in the city gaol. The cholera then prevailing very severely, he was seized with it, and died—a sad but not unusual reverse of fortune to befal a man who certainly gave more dinners to persons whom he did not care about than any man in her Majesty's empire. He left no issue, and his property may be said to have perished with the potatoes. A remnant of his property is in the 'Encumbered Estates' Court' for sale.”—R. Donovan.

“Mr. Alexander O'Driscoll, of Crookhaven, is said to represent a respectable branch of this family. The heads of other respectable branches were the late Dr. O'Driscoll, of Skibbereen, whose son and nephew are still living. The late Alexander O'Driscoll, J.P. left no issue; but his sister, Mrs. Freke, of Baltimore Castle, is still living.”—J. Mac Carthy Downing.

William Justin O'Driscoll, Esq. 28, Lower Fitzwilliam-st. Dublin, is of an ancient and respectable branch of this sept, but the Editor has not been able to learn anything of his pedigree. 407


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G105009: The genealogy of Corca Laidhe (in Irish)

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  1. Luigh-Ith, i. e. the smaller Ith, from Lugh, the comparative of beag, small. This name is still in use and pronounced Lowee, or like the French Louis. It seems cognate with Lugwig. 🢀

  2. Not of the sons of Milidh, i. e. not Milesians. According to the Irish Genealogists, Ith, the ancestor of the Corca-Laidhe, was the paternal uncle of Milidh or Milesius of Spain.
    1. Breogan (splits up into two branches, column 1:) 2. Bile, 3. Milidh of Spain; (column 2:) 2. Ith, 3. Lughaidh; Milidh of Spain had three sons, 4. Eibhear (ancestor of O'Brien), Eireamhon (ancestor of O'Neill), Ir (ancestor of Magennis). 🢀

  3. The Tuatha De Danann. This colony preceded the Clanna Mileadh, or Milesians, and arrived in Ireland in the year of the world, 2737, according to O'Flaherty's chronology. 🢀

  4. Fir-Bolg. Supposed by some to be the same as the Belgae of Gaul and Great Britain. They preceded the Tuatha De Danann, and arrived in Ireland, according to O'Flaherty's Chronology, in the year of the world, 2657. 🢀

  5. Clann-Neimhidh, i. e. the Race of Neimhidh. The ninth year of Neimhidh in Ireland is fixed by O'Flaherty to A.M. 2038. 🢀

  6. The seven invasions. For an account of these invasions of Ireland by Ceasair, Partholan, Neimhidh, the Fir-Bolg, Tuatha De Danann, &c. the reader is referred to the Leabhar Gabhala, also Keating's History of Ireland, and O'Flaherty's Ogygia🢀

  7. That discovered Eire. For the different accounts of the arrival of Ith in Ireland, see the Book of Ballymote, fol. 20, b. O'Clery's Leabhar Gabhala p. 69, Keating's History of Ireland, (Haliday's edition) p. 261, 262, and the Irish Nennius, p. 241. It is said that Ith saw Ireland from Breogan's tower at Corunna. See Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy, May 13th, 1844. He was killed by the Tuatha De Danann, but his son Lughaidh returned to Spain and informed his relatives of his death, upon which the sons of his relative Milidh or Milesius, his own son Lughaidh, and many of his brothers and relatives came to Ireland to revenge his death; and they finally succeeded in wresting the country from the Tuatha De Danann. See Keating's History of Ireland, (Haliday's Edition) p. 289. This invasion of Ireland by the Scoti, Gaeidhil, or Milesians, is fixed by O'Flaherty at A.M. 2934. 🢀

  8. Eire, i. e. Ireland. Nom. Eire, Gen. Eireann, Dat. Eirinn. 🢀

  9. Alba, now Scotland. Nom. Alba, Gen. Alban, Dat. Albain 🢀

  10. Maccon. He was Lughaidh Maccon, son of Maicniadh, who was son of Lughaidh Laidhe. He was the stepson of Oilill Olum, king of Munster, his mother Sadhbh being married to Oilill. He was defeated in the battle of Ceannfeabhradh, in the south of the present county of Limerick, by his stepfather, who banished him beyond seas in the year A.D. 237. Having spent some time in exile, he returned to Ireland with a great number of foreigners, and put into Galway bay, and seven days after his arrival on Thursday, (as the Annalist Tighearnach remarks) he defeated and slew his uncle Art, monarch of Ireland, in the battle of Magh-mucraimhe near Athenry, after which he became monarch of Ireland. The Four Masters give him a reign of thirty years, and the Annals of Clonmacnoise a reign of eighteen years, but O'Flaherty shortens it to three years. Keating states that Maccon was slain at the instance of King Cormac Mac Airt by a poet named Feirches at Deargrath [Derrygrath] near Cahir in the County of Tipperary. The simple fact of Maccon's flight into Great Britain to solicit aid against his uncle Art, has been magnified by the bards into his conquest of the World. The Ui-Fiachrach historians get up a similar exaggerated account about King Dathe having conquered Britain and Gaul. See Genealogies &c. of Ui-Fiachrach, pp. 19, 183. 🢀

  11. Daire Sirchreachtach, translated Darius Praedabundus by O'Flaherty, (Ogygia, part III. c. 67, p. 329.) He is called Daire Daimhtheach by Dubhaltach Mac Firbisigh and Dairine by Keating, who makes him contemporary with Deirgthine the ancestor of Oilill Olum, who wrested the sceptre of Munster from the race of Lughaidh, son of Ith. Keating writes: “The two royal residences of the kings of the province were Dun-g-Claire and Dun Eochair Mhaighe. The two divisions of Munster were governed by two families, namely, the descendants of Dairine and the descendants of Deirgthine, until the time of Oilill Olum, who was of the race of Deirgthine, and who, after having banished Maccon, who was of the race of Dairine, out of Ireland, assumed the government of both provinces and settled it upon his own issue, leaving the posterity of his son Eoghan Mor, and of Cormac Cas to succeed alternately to the sovereignty of the two provinces of Munster.” Keating's History of Ireland, (Haliday's Edition) p. 137. If this Daire (the progenitor of the Dairine), was really contemporary with Deirgthine, it is clear that the Book of Leacan is wrong, in making Maccon be his grandson; for Keating, D. Mac Firbisigh and O'Flaherty make Maccon the great grandson of Daire. The generations of the two lines of Deirgthine and Dairine from these two progenitors down to Oilill Olum and Lughaidh Maccon were as follows:
    (first column:) 1. Daire 2. Lughaidh Laidhe 3. Maicniadh 4. Lughaidh Maccon R. H.; (second column:) 1. Deirgthine 2. Derg 3. Mogh Neid 4. Mogh Nuadhat 5. Oilill Olum. 🢀

  12. Fothadh Canann. Most authorities agree in making him the third son of Lughaidh Maccon king of Ireland. O'Flaherty asserts that he was the ancestor of the Campbels (in Irish Mac Cathlin) Earls of Argyleshire. He seems to have left Ireland for some time. The pedigree of O'Laeghaire of Ui-Laeghaire, (Iveleary,) in the county of Cork, is traced to him by some genealogists, and also that of O'Baire of Muintir-Bhaire in the parish of Kilcroghane, in the west of the county of Cork. 🢀

  13. Eochaidh Opthach. He was monarch of Ireland according to O'Flaherty's Chronology, A.M. 3432. Keating traces his pedigree to Lughaidh Mac Ith as follows: “Eochaidh Opthach, son of Finn, son of Oilill, son of Flann Ruadh, son of Rothlan, son of Mairtine, son of Sithchinn, son of Riaghlan, son of Eoan Breac, son of Lughaidh, son of Ith.” 🢀

  14. Eochaidh Eadghothach, otherwise called Eochaidh Eadghadhach. He was monarch of Ireland, A.M. 3041. He was “the son of Daire, son of Conall, son of Eadamhon, son of Mal, son of Lughaidh, son of Ith.” Keating. According to the Leabhar Gabhala, Annals of the Four Masters, this monarch passed a law that the rank of his subjects should be distinguished by the color of their clothes, as, one color in the garment of a slave, two colors in the garment of a peasant, three in that of a soldier, four in that of a Brughaidh or public victualler, five in that of a chief of a cantred, six in that of the Ollamh (or chief professor,) and seven in those of Kings and Queens. See also O'Flaherty's Ogygia, part III. c. 23. 🢀

  15. Maccon, i. e. Lughaidh Maccon. See note k (=10), supra🢀

  16. Fothadh Airctheach, and Fothadh Cairptheach. They were sons of Maccon, and succeeded as joint monarchs of Ireland after the death of Cairbre Liffeachair in the year A.D. 296. See Ogygia, p. 153. A year after the commencement of their reign, Fothadh Cairptheach was slain by his brother Fothadh Airctheach, who was himself slain soon after at Ollarba [the river Larne,] in Magh-Line by Caeilte son of Ronan, one of Finn Mac Cumhaill's champions. For a very curious account of the identification at an ancient period, of the tomb of Fothadh Airctheach, on which his name was inscribed in Ogham characters, near the Ollarba, see Petrie's Round Towers of Ireland, pp. 105, 106. Tighearnach, the Annalist, does not mention either of these Fothadhs as monarchs of Ireland, having evidently regarded them as usurpers, but makes Fiach Roiptine succeed Cairbre Liffeachair at Tara. They are, however, mentioned as joint-monarchs of Ireland in the Annals of Clonmacnoise, but it is added that “these Fothies were none of the Blood Royall,” which shows that some doubts were entertained as to their real lineage. See note infra🢀

  17. Dunghalach Deabhthach, i. e. Dunghalach, the pugnacious. His period is unknown to the Editor. 🢀

  18. Lughaidh-Mal. It should be 'an rígh mhiligh'. O'Flaherty mentions this champion as of the race of Lughaidh, son of Ith, (Ogygia III.67,) but does not state when he flourished. He was the son of Daire Sirchreachtach. See App. A. 🢀

  19. Breatain-Leatha, i. e. Bretagne of Letavia, or Letavian Britany in France. See Ui-Fiachrach, p. 411. 🢀

  20. Lochlann. This is the name still in use in Ireland to denote Denmark or Scandinavia. See O'Brien's Irish Dictionary, in voce “Lochlannach”. 🢀

  21. Innse-h-Orc, i. e. the Orcades or Orkney Islands off the north coast of Scotland. 🢀

  22. Carn Mail, i. e. Mal's carn or heap of stones. Not identified. Muirtheimhne was the ancient name of that part of the county of Louth extending from Cuailgne or Cooley mountains to the river Boyne. See Leabhar na g-Ceart, p. 21, note s. 🢀

  23. Eochaidh Ceannmhairc. Unknown. 🢀

  24. From Doire and Deirgtheneadh to the time of Oilill Olum, i. e. for about four generations. See note l (=11) supra🢀

  25. Dartraidhe, &c. For the situation of these tribes see notes further on. 🢀

  26. Maicniadh, i. e. son of the hero. This may have been a cognomen of Lughaidh; but still it is clear that the compiler of the Book of Leacan has confounded Lughaidh Laidhe with his son Maicniadh, and thus shortened the line by one generation. Dubhaltach Mac Firbisigh has supplied this from other compilations. 🢀

  27. Maccon, i. e. son of the hound, or hero. Keating accounts for the origin of this name by this little fable:
    “Is in Olilli domo ut ejus praevignus, ut cujus matrem Sabham Conni Centipraelii filiam Olillus uxorem habebat, pusillus pusio versatus et nondum vestigia figere peritus ad Olilli canem venaticum Aquilam Rubram nomine manibus repens accessit, et canis infantulum ore saepius arripuit [recte ad ubera sorbenda accepit] nec tamen ab assiduo ad eum accessu coerceri potuit, quae res illi nomen Maccon peperit, quod perinde est ac canis venatici filius.”— Lynch.
    This, however, is clearly the conjectured derivation of a posterior age. The name Maccon would certainly denote “filius canis”, but it might be figuratively used to denote son of a hero, and this looks the more likely, as his father's name was Mac-niadh, i. e. son of a champion. The old Irish used the word “cu”, a dog, or hound, to denote a hero, or fierce warrior, and in this sense it frequently entered into the composition of names of men, as Cu-mara, i. e. dog of the sea; Cu-Uladh, dog of Ulster; Cu-Mumhan, dog of Munster. In the same sense the Latins used Catullus, Cato, and the Greeks Cyrus. 🢀

  28. Aenghus Gaifuileach, i. e. Aenghus of the bloody spear. He is also Aenghus Bolg, i. e. Aenghus of the sacks or quivers. The name Aenghus, which is anglicized Angus, Enos, and Latinized Aeneas, is compounded of “Aen”, singular, excellent, and “gus”, deed, or act. The word “gus” and “gal”, 'valor, fight', enter into the composition of names of men amongst the ancient Irish, Fearghus, Fearghal; Donnghus, Donnghall, &c. 🢀

  29. Ua Eidersceoil, i.e Nepos Edersceli, or Ederscelides, now anglicized O'Driscoll. Eiderscel was formerly very common as the name of a man denoting interpreter or interlocutor. The progenitor, from whom this surname was taken, was Eiderscel, son of Finn, the sixteenth in descent from Lughaidh Maccon, monarch of Ireland. The author of Carbriae Notitia is certainly in error, when he writes that O'Driscoll is descended from Conaire Mor son of Eiderscel, monarch of Ireland. “And tho' I doe believe that O'Driscoll is of royall extraction, because I conceive he is descended from Conary Mor Mac Eidriscoll, king of all Ireland, since even Dr. Keating confesseth that his posterity were seated in Iveragh and the west of Munster, yet the Irish antiquaries say there are but eight royall familyes in Munster, whereof we have three in Carbry, viz. Mac Carthy, O'Mahony and O'Donovan.” This writer should have known that the families of Iveragh and the west of Munster, mentioned by Dr. Keating as descended from Conaire son of Eiderscel, were the O'Falvys', O'Sheas', O'Connells', and their correlatives. See Leabhar na g-Ceart, pp. 47, 76; and that Keating actually gives the pedigree of O'Driscoll from Lughaidh Maccon, king of Ireland. 🢀

  30. Ua Cobhthaigh, i. e. nepos Cobhthachi, now O'Coffey and O'Cowhig. The name Cobhthach denotes Victor or Victorious. The progenitor after whom the surname was called was Cobhthach Finn, son of Dunghalach, the twelfth in descent from Lughaidh Maccon. This family was seated in the barony of Barryroe, where Dun Ui-Chobhthaig still marks their ancient residence. 🢀

  31. O'Floinn-Arda, i. e. O'Flynn of Arda. The chief of this family resided at Ardagh Castle, situate nearly midway between Skibbereen and Baltimore, in the barony of West Carbery and county of Cork. See O'Brien's Irish Dictionary in voce “Flann”, and also in voce “Cobhthach”, where he has some curious remarks upon the three families last mentioned. See note on Tuaith Ua Dubhdaledhe Triocha ched Medhonach infra🢀

  32. Fothadh Airctheach, &c. See notes m (=12) and q (=16) supra🢀

  33. The three sons of Aenchearda Bheara. These are frequently mentioned in Irish Romances as warriors. 🢀

  34. Finnchaemh, daughter of Ronan. Her history is unknown to the Editor. 🢀

  35. Garrdha, now called Garrdha Ua g-Cairbre, i. e. the garden of Carbery. The author of Carbriae Notitia describes this district as follows: “Three miles west of Ross lyes the harbour of Glandore, which is an exceeding good haven, and near it is a castle of the same name, and on the other side lyes a small territory called the Garry, (quasi the Garden) which is the best land in West Carberry, and off it half a league in the sea lyes a small island called the Squince.” &c.
    And again, westward of the Garry is the harbour of Castlehaven, &c. See also Smith's Natural and Civil History of Cork, vol. I. p. 271. 🢀

  36. Teampull mor Fachtna at Ros-ailithre, i. e. the cathedral church of Rosscarbery in the county of Cork. This is inserted from the Book of Baile an Mhuta. See Harris's Edition of Ware's Bishops, p. 583. This Maccraith flourished in the tenth century, if we may judge by his genealogy. Harris thinks that the Cathedral of Ros-ailithre was erected by St. Fachtna, the founder of the see, who flourished early in the sixth century; but we may safely infer that the church erected here at so early a period was one of very small dimensions. The only building of St. Fachtna's time now remaining is a small chapel about twelve feet long and eight feet broad, situate about half a mile to the east of the town. See Smith's Natural and Civil History of Cork, vol. I. p. 266. 🢀

  37. Aedh Garbh, i. e. Aidus Asper, or Hugh the Rough. According to the Dublin copy of the Annals of Innisfallen, he was slain in the year 1212 by the Ui Ceadagain. 🢀

  38. Ua Eidersceoil of Beara, i. e. O'Driscoll of Beare, now a barony in the south-west of the county of Cork. The family of O'Suileabhain (O'Sullivan) afterwards settled in this territory and drove out the O'Driscolls. 🢀

  39. Maccraith the Hospitable. He was chief of Corca Laidhe about the year 1418, as may be calculated from his place in the pedigree:
    1. Fothadh (splits in two columns, column 1:) 2. Donnchadh Mor, (splits up here in two branches) 3. Macraith and Amhlaibh Gascuineach, slain 1234. (Maccraith splits up here in two branches) 4. Donnchad Got, 5. Finghin, 6. Maccon, d. 1418; 4. (second branch starting with son of Macraith) Aedh Alainn, 5. Donnchadh, 6. Macraith. (Column 2:) 2. Aedh Garbh, slain A.D 1212. 🢀

  40. The Gascon. The death of this warrior is recorded in the Bodleian copy of the Annals of Innisfallen, under the year 1234 as follows:
    A.D. 1234. Ruag Trágha Lí la Gallaibh ar Gaedhealaibh, d'ár marbhadh Diarmait, mac Cormaic Liathanaigh, ocus Daíni maithi imdha eli do Desmumhain; ocus is ann sin do thuit in Gascunach O'h-Edirsceil ocus Muircheartach a dherbhráthair.
    A.D. 1234. The defeat of Traigh Li Tralee given by the English to the Irish, by which was slain Diarmaid, son of Cormac Liathanach and many other good persons of Deas-mhumhain Desmond; and it was on this occasion Gascunach O'h-Eidirsceoil and Muircheartach his brother fell. 🢀

  41. The vines grew without defect. It was the belief among the ancient Irish that the presence or superintendence of one of ancient pure noble blood and righteous principles, had an effect upon the seasons and the fruits of the earth. See Battle of Magh Rath, p. 100, and Tribes and Genealogies of Ui Fiachrach, p. 286. 🢀

  42. Clann an Ghascunaigh. The Editor is of opinion that the Gascoynes of Munster are of this tribe; but he has discovered nothing to prove it. 🢀

  43. O'Mathghamhna, now anglicized O'Mahony. Orlaidh, i. e. golden princess, is now obsolete as the name of a woman. 🢀

  44. Amhlaeibh Cael, i. e. Auliff, Awley, or Anlaff, the Slender. 🢀

  45. The Master, i. e. the Schoolmaster. He was probably master of the School of Ros-ailithre. 🢀

  46. Finnuala, more usually written Finnghuala, i. e. of the fair shoulders, This name is anglicized Finola, and sometimes made Penelope. 🢀

  47. Dirbhail, Dervilia, now obsolete as the name of a woman. 🢀

  48. Camchosach, i. e. the bandy-legged. 🢀

  49. Eiderscel. This is the progenitor, after whom the Ui Eidersceoil or O'Driscolls took their hereditary surname. No reference to him occurs in the Irish annals. He must have flourished about the year 942, as, according to the pedigree, Aedh Garbh O h-Edirsgeoil, (who was slain in 1212,) was the eighth in descent from him. The omissions by the scribe in this line have been inserted in brackets from the Book of Baile an Mhuta and other authorities. 🢀

  50. The Book which the poor people devoured in the wilderness. According to the Book of Ballymote this book was devoured by athaich, i. e. plebeians. 🢀

  51. Mughain of Cill-Mughaine, now Kilmoone in the barony of Kinelmeaky. The pedigree of this virgin is not given by the O'Clerys. [Erratum p. 418:] “Cill-Mughaine, i.e. the Church of St. Mugania, is not Kilmodan, but Kilmoon, a townland on Sherkin island in the parish of Tullagh, County of Cork. It bounds Kinish harbour, and contains a holy well called Tobar Mughaine otherwise Tobar-Gabha. See Ord. Map of the County of Cork, Sheets 149 and 153.” 🢀

  52. Lighain, more usually called Liadhain and Liedania. See Ussher's Primordia, p. 792, and Colgan's Acta Sanctorum, pp. 458, 464. Her son, St. Ciaran Saighre established a nunnery for her in the neighbourhood of Saighir at a place called Cill-Liadhaine, now anglicized Killyon, a small village situate in the barony of Fircall, King's County, nearly midway between Birr and Kinnity. “Jam dictus Biographus Hiberniae Sanctorum primogenitum illum [Keranum] appellat: tum praeterea addens, non modo Liadanam eum matrem fidelem Christianam et Sanctam Dei famulam effecisse (Cella eidem in propinquo loco aedificata, quae dicitur Scotice, Ceall Lidain; sed etiam suam gentem, id est, Osraigi, et plurimos alios de errore gentilitatis ad Christi fidem convertisse” Primordia p. 792. 🢀

  53. Fintract-Clere, i. e. the fair or white strand of Cape Clear Island in the south of the County of Cork. This strand is now called Traigh-Chiarain. It is described as follows in Smith's Natural and Civil History of Cork, b. ii. c. 4.
    “A little to the east of the castle [of Dunanore, on the N.W. point of Cape Clear island,] is a cove called Tra-Kieran, i. e. St. Kieran's strand, on which is a pillar stone with a cross rudely cut towards the top, that, they say, was the workmanship of St. Kieran; and near it stand the walls of a ruined church, dedicated to the same saint. This stone they hold in great veneration, and assemble round it every fifth of March, on which day they celebrate the festival of their patron.” According to Ussher's Chronological Index, and the Dublin copy of the Annals of Innisfallen, St. Kieran was born in the year A.D. 352; he studied at Rome, and in the year A.D. 402, founded Saighir. 🢀

  54. Saighir the cold. This is referred to as nomen fontis, in the Feilire Aenguis at fifth of March. The place is now called in Irish Saighir-Chiarain anglicized Serkieran, which is a townland, containing the ruins of a church, in a parish of the same name, in the barony of Ballybritt, King's County. See Ussher's Primordia, pp. 791, 792, and Colgan's Acta SS. p. 429. 🢀

  55. Conall and Fachtna. This should be Fachtna and Conall. Fachtna, who had been abbot of Molana in the County of Waterford, founded Ros-ailithre, about the year 590. See Colgan's Acta SS. p. 596. 🢀

  56. To the Race of Eidirscel, i. e. to the race of Eiderscel, son of Nathe, who was contemporary with St. Ciaran, and his relative, as will appear from the following genealogical table:
    1. Aenghus Gaifuileach, (splits in two columns, column 1:) 2. Nathe, 3. Eiderscel. (Column 2:) 2. Aenghus, 3. Liadhain or Liedania, 4. St. Ciaran Saighre.
    The Ui Eidersceoil, or O'Driscolls, took their hereditary surname not from this Eiderscel, but from Eiderscel, son of Finn, the twelfth in descent from him. 🢀

  57. Cill-Chiarain, i. e. St. Ciaran's church. The ruins of this church are still to be seen near the strand of Traigh-Chiarain on the Island of Cape Cleare. See note c (=53) supra. The cross here referred to is also still to be seen sculptured on a pillar stone near Cill-Chiarain. For a curious reference to a similar cross sculptured on a stone near Ballina-Tirawley by St. Patrick, see Genealogies, &c. of Ui-Fiachrach, p. 468.
    A similar account of the birth of St. Ciaran on this island, and of the conversion of the inhabitants to Christianity, is given by the Scholiast of Aengus at the fifth of March, which is translated by Colgan as follows, Acta SS. p. 471
    “Maguir vero ad 5 Martii, fuse de ipso disserit. Patricius, inquit, de S. Kierano cecinit; est fons Saigh-fhuar dictus: ad quem extrues Cathedram tuam: et ego ibi post annos triginta conveniam te. Kieranus hic fuit filius Brandubii, filii Bressalii, filii Branii, filii Fianbothae, filii Nessarii, filii Dimani, &c. Liedania filia Manii Cherr, filii Aengussii de stirpe Lugadii, filii Ithi, fuit mater S. Kierani: et Fintracht est nomen loci, in quo natus est. Et incolae Regionis de Corca-Laigde, in qua natus est, erant primi, qui in Hibernia crediderunt. Kieranus autem incoluit Sagiriam annis triginta ante adventum Patricii. Prophetavit Kieranus de S. Conallo et S. Fachtnano de Ros-alithir dicens: nascetur filius in Tulachteann, qui nobis fido amicitiae foedere junctus erit: et post eum multos monachos, et Monasteria reget Conallus. Praedixit etiam familiam Heterscheolanam Dominium et Principatum in sua regione continuo obtentaturam; et principem de Corca-Laigdhe habiturum publicam potestatem jus dicendi, et mulctas exigendi in sua provincia, modo fidem Christi amplectatur, et suam colat clientelam. Fuit Kieranus primarius sanctorum Hiberniae. Fuit etiam vir valde locuples in armentorum passionibus. Domus ejus armentaria sive bovile decem habebat portas, et decem particularia reclusoria: in singulis erant decem vituli; et singulos vitulos decem alebant vaccae. Kieranus de eorum fructu, et lacticinus nihil gustabat, quamdiu vixit; sed omnia inter Christi pauperes et egenos distribuebat. Habebat etiam equos jugales quinquaginta pro aratro et agricultura. Nec tamen de eorum fructu vel unum tota vita comedebat panem. Cibus ejus quotidianus, quem vesperi tantum sumebat, erat una bucella panis hordeaci cum crudarum herbarum obsonio, et frigidi fontis haustu. Ejus vestis erat ex cervinis pellibus, quas humido stragulo superindutus obducebat. Quando aliquantulum pausabat saxum erat ipsi pulvinaris loco.” 🢀

  58. This Book of Dues. This passage was evidently extracted from some book of tributes belonging to the church of Ros-ailithre. Colgan quotes Cathaldus Maguire who refers to a life of St. Ciaran, written by Cairneach Mael, which was preserved at Serkieran. “Carnechus cognomento Mael est qui Kierani mirabilia miro et eleganti metro conscripsit, ejusque opus Sagiriae adhuc asservatur: et quicumque illud legerit animam Carnechi scriptoris Deo recommendet.” Acta SS. p. 471, col. 1. 🢀

  59. Ard-na-b-Partan in Inis-beag, i. e. Crab-fish hill on the Little island. This island is still so called in Irish, and anglicized Inishbeg. It belongs to the parish of Aghadown, East division of West Carbery. See the Ordnance Map of the County of Cork. Sheet 150. 🢀

  60. Gleann-Sibhne, i. e. glen or valley of bullrushes, not identified. 🢀

  61. Bearra, now Beare, a territory in the south-west of the County of Cork. 🢀

  62. Inis-duine, i. e. the island of Man, now Inchydoney, an island in the bay of Clonakilty, which divides the barony of Ibawne from that of Barryroe in the County of Cork. See Smith's Natural and Civil History of Cork, vol. I. Book II. c. 3. 🢀

  63. Scal Balbh, i. e. Scal the Stammerer. O'Flaherty says that Bania, daughter of Seal Balbh, king of Finland, was the Queen of Tuathal Teachtmhar, monarch of Ireland, A.D. 130. A personage of the name seems to have flourished in Ireland from the many places named after him, as Gleann-an-Scail, in the County Antrim, Leac-an-Scail, a great Cromleach, in the County of Kilkenny, and Leachtan-Scail, i. e. the Scal's monument in the barony of Corcaguiny, County of Kerry. 🢀

  64. Olnegmacht, an old name of Connaught, probably the same as the Nagnatae of Ptolemy. 🢀

  65. Cruithean-tuaith, i. e. Pictland. 🢀

  66. Manann, the Isle of Mann. 🢀

  67. Alba, i. e. Scotland, or perhaps Albion England. 🢀

  68. In quest of wealth, i. e. to seek his fortune. 🢀

  69. It brought him from the east, i. e. it induced him to return home from Alba, which lies to the east of Ireland. 🢀

  70. Rath-gunta, i. e. the rath or fort of the wounding or slaying, a name now obsolete. 🢀

  71. Feara-Cul in Breagha; a territory of East Meath nearly coextensive with the baronies of Upper and Lower Kells. The churches of Magh bolg (Moybolgue,) and Imleach-Fia, (Emlagh,) are mentioned as in this territory. See O'Clery's Irish Calendar at 5th of April and 26th of November. 🢀

  72. Calraidhe of Bri-Leith. The position of this sept is preserved by the mountain or hill of Sliabh gCalraidhe (Slieve Golry) near Ardagh, in the County of Longford. See Annals of the Four Masters, A.D. 1445, and Leabhar na gCeart, p. 9, note p. to which add “The ruins of the nunnery of Duuimcheo, referred to as at the west side of this hill, is still pointed out at the rere of Mr. Ousely's house, in the townland of Bawn mountain and parish of Moydon.” There was another sept of Calraidhe near Caiseal in Munster, who were not of this race but descended from Lughaidh Cal the sixth in descent from Tadhg, son of Cian, son of Oilioll Olum. See D. Mac Firbisigh, Book of Genealogies, p. 668. 🢀

  73. The same as Calraidhe-an-chaladh, i. e. of the same race. Calraidhe-an-chaladh is comprised in the barony of Clonlonan in the County of Westmeath, and is now considered to be coextensive with the parish of Ballyloughloe in this barony. The Calraidhe of Westmeath were dispossessed at an early period by the Conmhaicne and the race of Maine, son of Niall. See O'Flaherty's Ogygia, Part III. c. 85. 🢀

  74. Calraidhe-Innse-Nisc. This was another name for Calraidhe of Cuil-Cearnadha. See note 98 infra, page 31. 🢀

  75. Calraidhe of the Three Plains, a sept seated in the barony of Tirawley, County of Mayo. See Ui-Fiachrach, 239. 🢀

  76. Calraidhe of Breagh-mhaine, a sept seated in the barony of Brawney in the County of Westmeath. They were dispossessed at an early period by the race of Maine, son of the monarch Niall of the Nine Hostages. 🢀

  77. Calraidhe-Luirg, a sept seated in Magh Luirg, in the barony of Boyle and County of Roscommon. The O'Dreains were dispossessed by the Mac Dermots before the English Invasion. 🢀

  78. Calraidhe of Corann, a sept seated in the barony of Corran, County of Sligo. O'h-Innreachtaigh of this place is unknown. The name is common in Ulster, where it is anglicized Hanratty, but the family bearing that name in Ulster are of the race of the Oirghialla. 🢀

  79. Calraidhe of Cuil-Cearnadha, a sept seated in the territory of Coolcarney, which comprises the parishes of Attymass and Kilgarvan, in the barony of Gallen, County of Mayo. This tribe opposed the preaching of St. Patrick. See Genealogies &c. of Ui-Fiachrach, p. 471 . They were dispossessed at an early period by the Ui-Fiachrach. 🢀

  80. O'Scingin is the hereditary chief. This should come after Calraidhe Luirg. The head of the O'Sgingins was seated at Ardcarne, near Boyle, in the County of Roscommon. See Annals of the Four Masters, A.D. 1224, and Genealogies, &c. of Ui-Fiachrach, p. 77, note e. 🢀

  81. Calraidhe of Loch-Gile, otherwise called Calraidhe, now Calry, a parish adjoining Loch Gile, (Lough Gill) in the barony of Carbury and County of Sligo. See Ui-Fiachrach, p. 276, and the map prefixed to that work. 🢀

  82. Dartraidhe, a sept giving name to a territory comprised in the barony of Rossclogher, in the County of Leitrim, which is still popularly called Dartry. 🢀

  83. Meg-Fhlannchaidh, now anglicized Mac Clancy and Clancy, a name still numerous in this barony. See Appendix B. 🢀

  84. Meg-Crunnluachra. This should be Tealach Cruinnluachra, which was one of the tribe names of the Mac Clancys of Dartry. 🢀

  85. Tealach-Churnain, i. e. the O'Curnains or O'Curnins. In latter ages the head of this family resided on Inis-mor, Locha-Gile, or Church Island in Lough Gill. The O'Curnins were for many centuries hereditary poets to the O'Rourkes. See the Annals of the Four Masters, A.D. 1416, 829, notes i, j, k. 🢀

  86. The Ui Finn, i. e. the family of O'Finn, now Finn without the prefix O. A branch of the family was settled at Ballymagibbon, near Cong in the County of Mayo, where they have become lately extinct, in the person of the late John Finn, Esq. the maternal Uncle of Dr. Wilde, author of the Beauties of the Boyne, &c. He possessed a small estate of eight hundred acres of land in fee simple. There are other members of this tribe in the town of Galway and in various places throughout the province of Olnegmacht. 🢀

  87. Tealach-Critain, i. e. the family of O'Credain, or Credan. 🢀

  88. Tealach-Treabhaire, i. e. the family of O'Treabhair, or Trevor. 🢀

  89. Tealach-Uaruisce, i. e. the family of O'Uaruisce, or Hourisky. This name is still extant in the County of Donegal. 🢀

  90. Tealach-Cairnean, i. e. the family of O'Cairnen. This name is now obsolete. 🢀

  91. Tealach-Cascain, &c. These septs are unknown to the Editor. 🢀

  92. The Book of Druim Saileach. This book is now unknown. There were several places of the name Druimsaileach [Dorsum salicum,] in Ireland, but the one here referred is probably the hill of that name at Armagh. 🢀

  93. Druim-Sneachta. The only place now bearing this name in Ireland is Druim-sneachta, anglice Drumsnat in the barony and County of Monaghan, where there was an ancient monastery, founded by St. Molua of Cluainfearta-Molua. See the Calendar of the O'Clerys at 4th of August and 4th of September. The Book of Druimsneachta which is now unknown, is frequently referred to as authority for the remotest events in Irish history; and Keating, who appears to have seen a copy of it, states, “that it had existed before St. Patrick came to Ireland.” See Haliday's Edition of Keating's History of Ireland, p. 215. 🢀

  94. Calraidhe of Magh h-Eleag, a sept, giving name to a territory nearly coextensive with the parish of Crossmolina in the barony of Tirawley and County of Mayo. See Genealogies, &c. of Ui-Fiachrach, p. 238, note f, and the map prefixed to that work. 🢀

  95. O'Mailfhina, now Mullany. There is an obvious defect in the text here, which should be as follows: “The Calraidhe of this district became extinct, and O'Mailfhina of the race of Aenghus, son of Amhalghaidh, of the sept of the Ui-Fiachrach, became the hereditary chieftain. The family of O'Mailfhina also became extinct, except a few, and the Ui-Gaibhtheachain and the Ui-Floinn, who are also of the race of Aenghus, son of Amhalghaidh, took possession of the land, and are now the most powerful therein.”
    The little town of Crossmolina, Cros-Ui-Mhailfhina, in Tirawley, took its name from this family. 🢀

  96. Ui-Gaibhtheachain, now Gaughan, a name still common in this district. See Ui-Fiachrach, pp. 13, 238. 🢀

  97. The Ui-Floinn, i. e. the family of the O'Flynns. The head of the O'Flynns was seated at Oireamh, now Errew in the parish of Crossmolina, where he was airchinneach of the church of St. Tighearnan. This family possessed a very curious relic called Mias Tighearnain, i. e. St. Tighearnan's dish. See Ui-Fiachrach, p. 239, note i. 🢀

  98. Cuil-Cearnadha. See notes 74, 79 supra🢀

  99. Fidh-Gathlaidh, i. e. Gateley's forest, a large forest in the territory of Gaileanga, now the barony of Gallen in the County of Mayo. See Annals of the Four Masters at the year 1225. 🢀

  100. Calraidhe-Innse-Nisc. See note y =74 supra🢀

  101. O'Rothlain. This name is still extant in this district, but anglicized Rowley. See Annals of the Four Masters at the year 1208, and Ui-Fiachrach, p. 246, note h. 🢀

  102. Ua Cuinn, now Quin. 🢀

  103. Ua h-Iarnain, now obsolete. 🢀

  104. Ua Finain, now O'Finan. Dr. O'Finan, formerly Roman Catholic Bishop of Killala was of this family and a native of this very territory. 🢀

  105. Corca-Oirche. In a poem in the Duinseanchus, as in the Book of Leacan, fol. 256, this tribe is placed a coicrich Chaisil, in the vicinity of Cashel in Munster. See also Ogygia, part III, c. 67. 🢀

  106. Laighis of Ui-Eineachlais. The Ui-Eineachlais were seated in the present barony of Arklow, in the County of Wicklow, where the sept of Laighis are now unknown. 🢀

  107. Dal-Mescorb, otherwise called Dal-Mesincorb, a sept seated along the east of the present County of Wicklow. See the Feilire Aenguis at 22nd of May, and Annals of the Four Masters, A.D. 952, and Life of St. Coemhghin by the Bollandists at 3rd of June. 🢀

  108. Coscraidhe in the Deise, a sept seated in the Decies in the County of Waterford, See Ogygia, part III. c. 67. 🢀

  109. West of Dor, i. e. of Cuan-Dor, now Glandore harbour near Skibbereen in the County of Cork. 🢀

  110. Swear for his debts, i. e. five of them enforced payment, or fulfilment, by their evidence when necessary; “tonndais”, they swear for. 🢀

  111. Secure his debts, i. e. five of them took security for the payment of their father's income, and the rendering of his privileges. There are but four names in the text, given as those of the brethren to the east of Dor. 🢀

  112. Silan the Bishop. There are many bishops of this name mentioned in O'Clery's Irish Calendar, as, Sillan, bishop of Gleann-da-clocha at 10th of February; Sillan, bishop of Daimh-inis, A.D. 638; Sillan, bishop, 7th of September; Sillan, bishop of Lismore, 21st of December, but nothing has been discovered to show which of them is here referred to. 🢀

  113. n The Ui-Cathbhaidh, a sept seated in Ormond in the County of Tipperary. The country of this sept is described in the Book of Leacan (fol. 208) as extending from Feart-Moraidh southwards to Sliabh Eibhlinne (the Slieve Phelim mountains.) In the Book of Leinster, fol. 105, the Finn-shruth or river of Nenagh, is described as in the territory of the Ui-Cathbhaidh. 🢀

  114. Ui Badhamhna, a sept near Baltimore in the County of Cork. The castle of Arda occupies the very centre of this territory. See O'Brien's Irish Dictionary, voce “Flann”. 🢀

  115. See note at the end of this tract. 🢀

  116. Feith-na-h-imghona, i. e. the boggy stream or trench of the killing or slaying. Not identified. See note infra🢀

  117. Droichead-Locha-Imchadha, i. e. the bridge of Loch-Imchadha, or Imchadh's lake. Not identified. 🢀

  118. Cliach was the ancient name of the district lying round Cnoc Aine (Knockany) in the Co. of Limerick. 🢀

  119. Ara-Cliach, an ancient territory in the east of the County of Limerick, comprising the entire of the barony of Coonagh. See Leabhar na g-Ceart, p. 46, note z. 🢀

  120. Femhen-mhagh, i. e. Magh-Feimhen, a plain in the barony of Iffa and Offa, East, in the County of Tipperary. See Leabhar na g-Ceart, p. 18, note b. 🢀

  121. Cliach-an-mhagh, i. e. Cliach of the plain. 🢀

  122. The Uaithne-Thire, called the barony of Owney in the Co. of Tipperary. See Leabhar na g-Ceart, p. 45. note x. 🢀

  123. Uaithne-Cliach, the barony of Owneybeg in the County of Limerick. Ibid. 🢀

  124. Corca-Laidhe-Cuile, i. e. the Corca Laidhe of the corner or angle. These were seated in the peninsula of Muintir-Bhaire, in the parish of Kilcrohane in the south-west of the County of Cork. 🢀

  125. Lothra-Ruadhain, called Lorha, in the barony of Lower Ormond, County of Tipperary, where St. Ruadhan or Rodanus erected a monastery in the sixth century. The Book of Lothra is now unknown. 🢀

  126. Cathair-Durlais, i. e. the city or stone-fort of Durlas. There are several places of the name in Ireland. There is a very remarkable fort called Rath-Durlais, in the parish of Cill-Ruadhain (Kilruane) barony of Lower Ormond and County of Tipperary, which may be the one here referred to. 🢀

  127. Fachtna. This is the patron saint of Ros-ailithre, Roscarbery, in the County of Cork. 🢀

  128. Fachtna. This is the patron saint of Ros-ailithre, Roscarbery, in the County of Cork. 🢀

  129. Bearchan. This passage is not in the Book of Ballymote, except the lines after given. The passage in the Book of Ballymote is given in [brackets.] 🢀

  130. The boundaries. The words enclosed in brackets are taken from the Book of Ballymote🢀

  131. Beann-Fhinn, i. e. Finn's peak or pointed hill. Not identified. 🢀

  132. Traigh-Omna, i. e. strand of the oak. Name obsolete. 🢀

  133. Feith-na-h-imghona, i. e. the boggy trench or stream of the killing or slaying. Not identified. 🢀

  134. Beal-atha-buidhe, i. e. mouth of the yellow ford. Mr. Swanton of Ballydehob says that Ath-buidhe is the name of a ford on a stream which forms the north boundary of Ardglass or Greenmount in the parish of Kilcoe. The northern boundary of Greenmount is within four or five fields of Ath-buidhe. 🢀

  135. Traigh-claen, i. e. the inclining or sloping strand, now Traigh-Claine between the Galley-head and Traigh-Ruis. The rock referred to in the text is now called Carraig-Clidhna. 🢀

  136. Seven and twenty bishops. These verses are quoted by O'Flaherty in his Ogygia, part III. c. 67, p. 330, and referred to by Harris in his edition of Ware's Bishops, p. 584, but the names of these bishops are not given in any list yet discovered. 🢀

  137. O'Gillamichil, now unknown. 🢀

  138. Ceann-mara, i. e. head of the sea, is evidently the head of Glandore harbour. See note i recte k (=161), p. 51, infra🢀

  139. Beann-Sidhain, i. e. the peak or pointed hill of the fairy mound, Beenteeane in the townland of Farranconor, parish of Castlehaven, and barony of East division of West Carbery. 🢀

  140. Beal-atha-seamann, i. e. mouth of the ford of the rivets. Not identified. 🢀

  141. Leaders. Oglaich. These were the petty chiefs, Kenfinies, or heads of families, who held their lands by the same right of descent from the common ancestor as the chief himself; and they were called Og-laich, young heroes, because they were bound to assist him in his wars against his enemies at the heads of their respective clans. 🢀

  142. O'Duibharda, now Doorty, a name still extant and numerous in the County of Cork. 🢀

  143. O'Dunlaing, now Dowling, or Doolin. 🢀

  144. O' h-Ogain, now Hogan, without the prefix O'. Mr. Hogan, the celebrated sculptor, who is a native of Cork, is probably of this race, and not of the O'Hogans of Ard-Croine in the County of Tipperary. 🢀

  145. O'Dubhagain, now Doogan and Duggan. This family, which is still numerous in this district, is to be distinguished from the Ui Dubhagain of Fermoy in the north of the County of Cork. 🢀

  146. Ua Meiceidich, now Mac Keady and Keady. Mr. Thos. Swanton says that the name is still extant near Bantry. He remarks that when the baptismal name is prefixed the M is not pronounced, thus, Domhnall 'ac Eidigh [eidi]. 🢀

  147. Ua Ciabhain, now Keevan. 🢀

  148. Ua Ceartaigh, obsolete. 🢀

  149. Ua Buadhaigh, now Buaig, the g pronounced. They consider themselves Sullivans—T. S. (=Th. Swanton) 🢀

  150. Ua Mongain, now Mongan and Mangan. Still extant near Dromaleague. 🢀

  151. Ua Doirc, now Durk and Dark. 🢀

  152. Ua Meccon, now Macken. 🢀

  153. Ua Aingle, now Ceangail, or Muinir-Cheangail.—T. S. 🢀

  154. Ua Mothla, now O'Mothola, Mohilly; extant near Dromaleague.—T. S. 🢀

  155. Ua Maeileadair. In D. Mac Firbisigh it is O'Maoilpeadair. Obsolete. 🢀

  156. Ua Adhaimh, now obsolete. 🢀

  157. Ua Bairr, now Barr 🢀

  158. Ua Rosna, now obsolete. 🢀

  159. Of this territory. The words enclosed in brackets are taken from D. Mac Firbisigh's Genealogical Book, p. 692. 🢀

  160. The representative of Bearchan, i. e. the airchinneach of Gleann Bearchain, or the parish of Castlehaven. 🢀

  161. The Garrgha, otherwise written an Garrdha, i. e. the Garden. This is still the name of a fertile district in the parish of Myross, in the barony of West Carbery. See Smith's Cork, book II. c. 4, and Carbriae Notitia, where it is stated that it is called “the Garry, i. e. the Garden, from its being much better land than the rest of West Carbery.” 🢀

  162. Ceann-mara, i. e. head of the sea. This was the ancient name of the head of Cuan Dor or Glandore harbour, at O'Donovan's Leap. 🢀

  163. Loch-an-Bhricin, i. e. the lake of the little trout. Obsolete. 🢀

  164. Midhros, angl. Myross, a townland containing the ruins of an old church in a parish of the same name on the west side of Glandore harbour. 🢀

  165. Midhros, angl. Myross, a townland containing the ruins of an old church in a parish of the same name on the west side of Glandore harbour. 🢀

  166. Beal-an-atha-solais, i. e. mouth of the ford of the light. Now Ath-solais, (Aughsollis) a ford on the river Ilen, about a mile westward of the town of Skibbereen.—T. S. 🢀

  167. O'Conneid, g. Conned. In D. Mac Firbisigh's copy this name is made O'Cendedigh, now O'Kennedy and Kennedy. 🢀

  168. O'Muimhnich, angl. Moyny, locally O'Muimhnig, (the final g pronounced.) 🢀

  169. O'Drochruainnigh. In D. Mac Firbisigh's copy it is written O'Drochruimnigh. Both forms are now obsolete. 🢀

  170. O'Fuailchin, O'Tuailchin, in D. Mac Firbisigh's copy. 🢀

  171. O'Caingni, now obsolete. 🢀

  172. O'Dubhchonna, now Doheny. 🢀

  173. Fiadh-Ruis, i. e. the land or wood of Ross. 🢀

  174. Traigh-long, i. e. the strand of ships. “Traigh-na-long is on the south side of the promontory called Cothluidhe Mhor, and to the eastward of Dun-na-sead or Baltimore.” T. S. 🢀

  175. Sidh-na-bhfear-bhfinn, i. e. the fairy hill of the fair men. Now Shee Hill. 🢀

  176. O'Laeghaire, now O'Leary. This chieftain was, about the period of the English Invasion, driven from this armorican territory, and he settled with his followers in the parish of Inchagelagh or Iveleary in the barony of Muskerry. 🢀

  177. Ruaidhre, now Rory or Rogers. In D. Mac Firbisigh's copy this name is made O'Ruairc, which seems more correct. 🢀

  178. O'Lonain, now Lannin, and Lenane. 🢀

  179. O'Laidigh, now Liddy or Laddy. 🢀

  180. O'Torpa, now Torpy. 🢀

  181. O'h-Urmoltaigh, made O Turmoltaigh in the Book of Ballymote and in D. Mac Firbisigh's copy. This name is now anglicized Tromulty and Hamilton. 🢀

  182. O'Mirin, Mirreen. 🢀

  183. O'Macdairic, now obsolete. 🢀

  184. O'Tuaraidhe, obsolete. 🢀

  185. O'Treana, obsolete. 🢀

  186. O'h-Uainidhe, now Hooney or Green. 🢀

  187. O'Cerdin, Kerdin, Curdin. 🢀

  188. Fearsad-Ruis, i. e. the trajectus, crossing, or ferry of Ross. This was the ancient name of the passage at the head of Ross Bay beneath the church, over which a modern causeway extends. Windele🢀

  189. Goilin-na-gaethneamhdha, called Goilin-na-gaithneamhna in D. Mac Firbisigh's copy. This is probably the place called “Goleen marsh” in the parish of Aghadown. See the Ordnance Map of the County of Cork, Sheet 141. 🢀

  190. Dun-Deide, i. e. Deady's Dun or earthen fort, now Dundeady, a townland containing the ruins of a castle in the parish of Rathbarry. See the Ordnance Survey of the County of Cork, Sheet 144. Dr. Smith in his Natural and Civil History of Cork, book II. c. 3, describes Dundeedy as “a castle on a very small island to which there is a narrow passage from the main, being equally the work of nature and art.” 🢀

  191. Beal-atha-na-leice, i. e. mouth of the ford of the flag. Unknown. 🢀

  192. O'h-Aenghusa, anglice Hennessy. 🢀

  193. O'Corrbuidhe, Corby. 🢀

  194. Ua Dubhain, now Duane, Dwan, and Downes. 🢀

  195. Ua Duinin, now Dinneen, and latterly Downing. 🢀

  196. O'Mudain, now Modan. The parish of Ballymodan took its name from this family. 🢀

  197. O'h-Aidhne, now Hyney. 🢀

  198. O'Mainchin, i. e. Mannin. 🢀

  199. O'Cuis, now Cas and Hussey: O'Coise in D. Mac Firbisigh's copy. 🢀

  200. O'Cuile, now Cooley. 🢀

  201. O'Dearcain, now Derkan. 🢀

  202. O'h-Iairsnigh, O'Dreaain, in D. Mac Firbisigh. Both obsolete. 🢀

  203. O'h-Odhrain, now Horan. O'Tograin in D. Mac Firbisigh🢀

  204. O'Grese, O'Greisin in D. Mac Firbisigh. Obsolete. 🢀

  205. O'Cuilin, now Cullen. 🢀

  206. O'Sinnaigh, now Shinny or Fox; extant near Dromaleague. 🢀

  207. Inis-Duine, i. e. the island of the man, now the island of Inchydoney in the bay of Clonakilty, which divides the barony of Ibawne from that of Barryroe. See Ordnance Survey of Cork, Sheet 135. This island contains the ruins of a curious old church. 🢀

  208. Dun-Eoghain, i. e. Eoghan's fort, now Dunowen, a townland containing the ruins of a castle in the parish of Ardfield. Ordnance Map, Sheet 144. 🢀

  209. Glaise-draighneach, i. e. the brook or streamlet of the blackthorns. 🢀

  210. O'Fithcheallaigh, now anglicized Feehily and Feely, and even Field. The celebrated Maurice de Portu O'Fihely, called “Flos Mundi”, Archbishop of Tuam, from 1506 to 1513, was of this family. He was born near Baltimore, a town, as Harris remarks, “celebrated for its fine harbour,” from which he was known as “de Portu.” See Harris's edition of Ware's Bishops, p. 613. 🢀

  211. O'Cormaic, now Cormick. In D. Mac Firbisigh's copy this name is made O'Comhraidhe, now anglicized Cowry, Cory, Corry and Curry. 🢀

  212. O'Donnamhain, now O'Donovan and Donovan. O'Dondubhain in D. Mac Firbisigh's copy. This was a different family from O'Donnabhain of Ui-Cairbre Aebhdha in the now County of Limerick, and afterwards of Clann-Chathail in the County of Cork. Both families are no doubt still extant in Corca-Laidhe, but they cannot now be distinguished. The O'Donovans of Mountpellier, O'Donovan's Cove, Ardahill, and Lisheens, and Squince, as well as the Donovans of Ballymore in the County of Wexford, are of the Ui-Cairbre Aebhdha; but there are various poor families of the name in the County of Cork, who are unquestionably of the Corca-Laidhe. 🢀

  213. O'Dubhchon, Obsolete. 🢀

  214. O'h-Iarnain, now Mac Iarran. T. S. 🢀

  215. O'Nuallain, now Nowlan, or Nolan. 🢀

  216. O'Croinin, now Cronin, very numerous. T. S. 🢀

  217. O'Sife. Unknown. 🢀

  218. O'h-Ainbhith, now Hanvey and Hanafey. 🢀

  219. Beal-atha-na h-Uidhre, i. e. mouth of the ford of the dun cow, is now the name of a stream dividing the parish of Kilmeen from that of Dunmanway. Windele🢀

  220. Greallach na gruime. In Ballymote the reading is Achadh na g-Cruime and Achadh na cruimhe in D. Mac Firbisigh; now Grillagh in the parish of Kilnagross. See Ordnance Map, Sheet 122. 🢀

  221. Achadha, i. e. the fields. In the copy in the Book of Ballymote it is called Achadh-Aibhle and Achaidh Ailbhe, in D. Mac Firbisigh's copy. This place is now unknown. 🢀

  222. O'Donnghaile, now Donnelly. 🢀

  223. O'Mailchomadh, now obsolete. 🢀

  224. Ua h-Aedha, now O'Hea and Hayes. The author of Carbriae Notitia is wrong in asserting that the O'Heas are a branch of the O'Donovans. This writer places O'Hea in the barony of Barryroe: “Here is a small territory belonging to O'Hea and his followers, called Pubble O'Hea; in this tract of land, [i. e. Barryroe] is 1. Dundedy, a small castle on a narrow Isthmus much like that of Dunworly; it makes the promontory between the bays of Ross and Clonakilty. 2. Rathbarry, a stately large pile belonging to the Barrys. 3. Ahamilly, a small castle [one mile south-west of Clonakilty] belonging to O'Hea, who is of the same family with O'Donovan.” See also Smith's Natural and Civil History of Cork, book II. c. 3. 🢀

  225. Cluain-da-mhael, i. e. the lawn or meadow of the two hornless cows. This was probably the ancient name of Ahamilly. It is now obsolete. 🢀

  226. O'Loingsigh, now Lynch, Lynchy or Lingshy. 🢀

  227. O'Mailteimhin. Obsolete. 🢀

  228. O'Ceallaigh, now Kelly. 🢀

  229. O'Mailguirm. Obsolete. 🢀

  230. O'Muireadhaigh, now Murray. 🢀

  231. O'Sealbhaigh, now anglicized Shallow and Shelly. 🢀

  232. O'Gabhadhain, now Gavan, locally “Muintir-Ghabhain.” T. S. In D. Mac Firbisigh's copy it is made O'Cadhan, now Kyne. 🢀

  233. Beal-atha-buidhe. See p. 48, note h (=133)🢀

  234. Gort-na-daibhche, i. e. field of the cauldron or round hollow, now Gortnadihy, a townland in the parish of Kilmeen. See the Ordnance Map, Cork, Sheet 121. 🢀

  235. Loch-an-tairbh, i. e. lake of the bull, now Loughatarriff in the parishes of Kilmeen and Drinagh. Ordnance Map, Sheet 121. 🢀

  236. O'Dubhdaleithe, now Dowdall; D. Mac Firbisigh makes O'Cobhthaigh, O'Cowhig, the chief of this territory which he designates by the alias name of Triocha Meadhonaigh, i. e. the central cantred. 🢀

  237. O'Mailceallaich, Mulkelly. Now obsolete. 🢀

  238. O'Duibhleanna. Obsolete. 🢀

  239. O'Mailchorma. Obsolete. 🢀

  240. O'Cuileannain, now Cullennan. 🢀

  241. O'Bruadair, now anglicized Broderick and Broder. 🢀

  242. O'Dunadhaigh, now Downey and Denny. 🢀

  243. O'Laithimh, now Lahiff, Lahy and Leahy. 🢀

  244. Ua h-Eidersceoil, now O'Driscoll and Driscoll. 🢀

  245. Maccon. He was chief of Corca-Laidhe, and died in the year 1418, according to the Annals of the Four Masters. He was living at the time the Book of Leacan was compiled. 🢀

  246. Maccon. He flourished in the third century. This line of pedigree is pretty correct up to Maccon, but in the line from him up to Ith son of Breogan, there is a defect of a great number of generations. See Appendix C. 🢀

  247. Ua Cobhthaigh, now O'Cowhig and Coffey. This line of pedigree inserted in brackets, is taken from the Book of Ballymote. This family was seated in the barony of Barryroe, anciently called “Tricha chead meadhonach”, or the middle or central cantred. See O'Brien's Irish-English Dictionary, in voce “Cobhthach”, and Cambrensis Eversus, edited by the Rev. M. Kelly, p. 268, note x. Dr. Smith in his History of Cork, book II. c. 3, says: “ Almost on every headland of this barony, were castles erected by the Irish, seven of which belonged to the sept of O'Cowhig, as Dundeedy, Dunowen, Dunore, Duneen, Dunocowhig, Dunworley, and Dungorley.” 🢀

  248. Ui Eathach of Uladh, i. e. Iveagh in Ulidia. The pedigree of these Fothadhs appears very uncertain. See note supra🢀

  249. Tuath Forc and Tuath Iboth in Alba, i. e. in Scotland. Now unknown. 🢀

  250. Cluithrin-Cliach, the ancient name of a district in the now County of Limerick. Now obsolete. 🢀

  251. Sinainn. This is not the river Shannon, but a stream in the County of Tipperary. It is now called the river of Nenagh. 🢀

  252. Dergdhearc, now Lough Derg, an expansion of the Shannon between Killaloe and Portumna. 🢀

  253. Bladhma, now Slieve Bloom. 🢀

  254. Loch Feidhlime. Not identified. 🢀

  255. Finn Ua Baiscne. This was the celebrated Finn Mac Cumhaill, the Fingal of Mac Pherson's Ossian. 🢀

  256. This is an instance of a carn being formed for the general to stand up to command his army. It was probably also intended to mark the site of the battle. 🢀

  257. Eadain, i. e. Dun-Eadain, now Edinburgh in Scotland. 🢀

  258. i. e. Denmark 🢀

  259. i. e. the Orkney Islands to the north of Scotland 🢀

  260. an old name of Eire or Ireland. 🢀

  261. now Tara. 🢀

  262. i. e. the fort of the poets or learned men, a name for Teamhair or Tara. 🢀

  263. The Shannon was one of the Helicons of the ancient Bards of Eire. 🢀

  264. An edition of this text is available on CELT in file G503002. [BF] 🢀

  265. In the ITS edition, vol. 4, pp 42–43, we find the following genealogical list:
    Do Chraobhscaoileadh Shleachta Lughuidh mhic Íotha annso.
    Geinealach Uí Eidirsceoil
    86. Sir Fínghin
    85. mic Conchubhair
    84. mic Conchubhair
    83. mic Fínghin
    82. mic Mic Con
    81. mic Mic Con
    80. mic Fínghin
    79. mic Donnchaidh Guid
    78. mic Mic Raith
    77. mic Donnchaidh Mhóir
    76. mic Fhothaidh
    75. mic Finn
    74. mic Mic Con
    73. mic Fathaidh
    72. mic Eidirsceoil
    71. mic Finn
    70. mic Nuadhat
    69. mic Donnghaile
    68. mic Maoltuile
    67. mic Dúnghusa
    66. mic Aonghusa
    65. mic Folachtaigh
    64. mic Flannáin
    63. mic Branduibh
    62. mic Eidirsceoil
    61. mic Náthí
    60. mic Aonghusa Ghaifhuiligh
    59. mic Mic Con
    58. mic Niadh
    57. mic Luighdheach
    56. mic Dáire
    55. mic Fir Uillne
    54. mic Siothbhuilg
    53. mic Dáire
    52. mic Siothbhuilg
    51. mic Uillne
    50. mic Eadhamhrach
    49. mic Deaghuidh Deirg
    48. mic Deirgthine
    47. mic Nuadhat Airgthigh
    46. mic Lachtaine
    45. mic Logha Feidhligh
    44. mic Éireamhóin
    43. mic Eadhamain
    42. mic Gosa
    41. mic Sin
    40. mic Maithsin
    39. mic Logha
    38. mic Eadhamain
    37. mic Máil
    36. mic Luighdheach
    35. mic Íotha
    34. mic Breoghain ut supra
    Is ar shliocht Luighdheach mhic Íotha atáid na sloinnte se síos: Mag Amhalghuidh Callroighe, Ó Laoghaire Ruis, Mag Flannchuidh Dartroighe, Ó Cobhthaigh, Ó Cuirnin, Ó Floinn Árda, Ó Báire Arann agus Mac Ailín i n-Albain táinig ó Fhathuidh Canann mac Mic Con. Ar shliocht an Lughaidh se mhic Íotha atá Ó Treabhair Ó Criadhagáin agus Ó Cairnéin fós. [BF] 🢀

  266. “This Sir Finneen tooke his lands by Letters patent from Queen Elizabeth, and thereby extingnished the Irish rite. The former custome was that the oldest of the familie succeeded, unto whome Mac Cartie Reagh did give a rod, and then he was reputed and obeyed as lord of the countrie of Collimore. O'Driscoll did pay certaine rent and service unto Mac Cartie Reagh.” Ibid. 🢀

  267. In the original: 'Books of Leacan and Ballymote'. [BF] 🢀

  268. In the original 'b 32'; however, it is '632' in the section above and below. [BF] 🢀

  269. supscript 's'. [BF] 🢀

  270. Edited for example by Andrew Browning, English Historical Documents 1660–1714, vol. 6, 709–719. [BF] 🢀

  271. In the original a brace comprises the list from 'Ballyliney' to 'Licke'. [BF] 🢀

  272. Co-extensive with the diocese of Ross. In several instances the ancient Irish dioceses were co-extensive with some great tribe land. Thus, the bishoprick of Cill Mhic Duach (Kilmacduagh) was co-extensive with the territory of the Ui-Fiachrach-Aidhne, and the bishoprick of Eanach Duin (Annadown) was co-extensive with lar-Connacht, the seigniory of the O'Flahertys. (See O'Flaherty's Chorographical Description of lar-Connaught, p. 1,) and the bishoprick of Cill-Finnabhrach (Killfenora) embraced the country of the Corca-Modhruaidh, in North Munster. 🢀

  273. Irish text omitted, please refer to entry 1232.2 in CELT edition of the Annals of Innisfallen. [BF] 🢀

  274. This event is entered in the Dublin interpolated copy of the Annals of Innisfallen as follows:
    “A.D. 1233. Domhnall God Cairbreach, mac Domhnaill Mhóir na Curadh, do theacht d'aithríoghadh Uí Mhathghamhna agus Uí Chobhthaigh a g-Coill t-Sealbhuigh. Cath do chur ann do, agus trí mic Uí Mhathghamhna do mharbhadh do, .i. triur mac Donnchadha na h-imirce timchill.”
    “A.D. 1233. Domhnall God Cairbreach, son of Domhnall Mor-na-Curadh, came to depose O Mathghamhna and Cobhthaigh to Coill-t-Sealbhaigh, where he fought a battle, and slew the three sons of O'Mathghamhna, i. e. the three sons of Donnchadh na h-imirce timchill.”
    It is thus noticed, on the authority last quoted in Mons Laine's Pedigree of the Count Mac Carthy:
    “Donall Got-Ogue, Mac-CarthyMôr, 3e fils de Donall-Môr-na-Currad Mac Carthy, souverain de Desmond, eut en apanage la princepaute de Carbery. En 1233 il leva une armée pour detroner Dermod O'Mahony. Trois fils de ce dernier perirent dans cette guerre ainsi qu' ô Coffey de Coillsealvy. Moins heureux dans la guerre qu' il commenç a contre le Fitzgerald, en 1248, Donall fut tué, en 1251, par Jean de Callan, fils de Thomas Fitzgerald.” 🢀

  275. Sliabh Sneachta, i.e. the mountain of snow, angl. Slieve Snaght, a lofty mountain near the village of Carndonagh, in the barony of Inishowen and County of Donegal. Colgan who was born at the foot of this mountain, translates the name “mons nivium” See Trias Thaumaturga p. 181, n. 172. The entire of the peninsula of Inis-Eoghain belonged to Tir-Eoghain at this period, but was afterwards added to Tir-Chonaill. 🢀

  276. King of the Saxons, i.e. Henry III. King of England. 🢀

  277. The head, &c. No record of the fact of Brian O'Neill's head having been sent to London has been discovered except this poem. The Irish annalists, and also Clyn and Dowling, merely mention the fact that O'Neill was slain. Dowling adds that 352 of his followers were slain along with him “in Vico de Down.” 🢀

  278. The Gaeidhil, i.e. the native Irish or Milesian race of Ireland. 🢀

  279. The foreigners. The word Gaill is applied by the Irish writers to any foreigners. It seems to have been originally applied by them to the Gauls, a colony of whom from the coast of France is said to have settled in Ireland under Labhraidh Loingseach, A.M. 3682. See O'Flaherty's Ogygia, part III. c. 39, p. 262. From this it came to signify any foreign invaders, but before the twelfth century it was usually employed to designate the Danes and Norwegians. Since that period it is almost invariably applied to the English. See Colgan's Acta Sanctorum, p. 603, n. 11, and O'Brien's Irish-English Dictionary, voce Gall, 🢀

  280. Fate. In two paper copies in the Royal Irish Academy, the reading is oighidh🢀

  281. Dun, anciently called Dun-Cealtair and Dun-da-Cath-ghlas, but now Dun-Padraig anglice Downpatrick. It is the name of the County town of Down, and is much celebrated in Irish Ecclesiastical history as the burial place of the Trias Thaumaturga of Ireland, i.e. the S.S. Patrick, Bridget and Columbkille. See Colgan's Trias Thaumaturga pp, 169, 170; Lanigan's Ecclesiastical History of Ireland, vol. I. p. 87, and Reeves's Ecclesiastical Antiquities of Down and Connor, &c. p. 223 to 232. 🢀

  282. Caiseal, now Cashel in the County of Tipperary. 🢀

  283. Tailginn, i.e. the tonsured, a name which was originally applied by the Irish Druids to St. Patrick, and which continued to be applied to him by the Irish poets. See Petrie's History and Antiquities of Tara Hill, pp, 77, 78. 🢀

  284. Ard-Macha, i.e. the height or hill of Macha Mongruadh, queen of Ireland, about three centuries before the Christian era, now Armagh. Here the O'Neills of Tyrone had their family tomb. 🢀

  285. Under a white flag-stone. Some may think that Brian's head would have been placed on a pole over London bridge, a prey to the birds of the air. 🢀

  286. For my poem. The poem here alluded to is unknown to the Editor. Indeed no other poem attributed to our author is extant, except one on Cathal Croibhdhearg O'Conchobhair, king of Connacht, who died in the year 1224, and if this be really his composition he must have been a very old man in 1260, when the battle of Down was fought. 🢀

  287. Got them, i.e. from whom I received them. No one should seek reprisals of me, because I plundered the king alone and by his own consent. 🢀

  288. King of Macha, i.e. of Eamhain Macha, the ancient palace of the province of Ulster. 🢀

  289. Sunday. “A.D. 1260. O'Neyl regulus Ultonie occiditur cum multo opulo apud civitatem de Duno, dominica infra octavas Ascensionis.”—Clyn. The Irish considered that fighting on Sunday was an omen of ill success to them. 🢀

  290. The race of Mileadh, i.e. the Milesian race, whose chief residence was originally at Teamhair or Tara. 🢀

  291. The destiny. The belief of the ancient Irish in predestination appears from various writings. See the Battle of Magh Rath, pp. 172, 269, and the Miscellany of the Irish Archaeological Society, pp. 2. 5, 7, 8, 9. 🢀

  292. Port Lairge. This is the ancient and present Irish name of the city of Waterford. It would appear to have derived this name from a Danish chieftain Lairge or Larac, or as the Danes write it Largo, who is mentioned in the Annals of the Four Masters at the year 951. The name Waterford or Vedrafiordr, was given it by the Danes; which is supposed to signify “weather bay.” 🢀

  293. Linen Shirts. This confirms Giraldus's account of the Irish mode of fighting: “Praeterea nudi et inermes ad bella precedunt. Habent enim arma pro onere. Inermes vero dimicare pro audacia reputant et honore.” (Dist. III. c. 10.) Dr. O'Conor has the following observations upon the Irish mode of fighting, in his suppressed work of Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Charles O'Conor of Belanagare, p. 79; “It is well known that the Irish always fought under very great disadvantages against the English, who were covered with armour, while they [the Irish] had no such defence. Polydore Virgil says that at the battle of Newark, in the reign of Henry VII. the Irish fought with astonishing bravery; but that having their bodies uncovered, according to their native custom, they were cut to pieces: “Contra Hiberni etsi proelium magnis animis edebant, attamen, cum patrio more nullis armis corpora tecta haberent, ante omnes passim cadebant, eorumque caedes aliis multo maxime formidine erat.”” 🢀

  294. The race of Conn, i.e. the descendants of Conn of the Hundred Battles, monarch of Ireland iu the middle of the second century. This race included the O'Conors of Connacht as well as the O'Neills, Mac Mahons, and other chieftains of Ulster. 🢀

  295. This quatrain is obscure, but the meaning is this. The cause of our losing this battle, which was fought in defence of the rich plains of Ireland, was, that our chieftains could not be induced to defer till Monday. Sunday was no day for fighting, and we had the ill success of having profaned that day. 🢀

  296. By poison. See also line 99. Leland says that the Irish prince fell by the treachery of his own people, and quotes Ann. Innisf. MSS. No allusion to treachery is made in the Dublin copy of the Annals of Innisfallen, but his death is entered in the Bodleian copy as follows: “1260. Brien O'Néyll, rí Cinal Eoghin, d'á tugsat Gedhil brághdi, ⁊ ná tuc cys na cá in do righ Sagsan, do mharbhadh d'á Ghedhilibh fén, ⁊ do ní de Gallibh ac Dún dá Leathghlas.”
    “1260. Brian O'Neill, king of Cineal Eoghain, to whom the Gaeidhil had given hostages, and who had not given rent or tribute to the King of the Saxons, was killed by his own Gaeidhil and some of the Galls at Dun-da-leath-ghlas.” 🢀

  297. Inis Fail, one of the ancient names of Ireland. 🢀

  298. Breagh: a plain in the south-east of the ancient Meath. Brian is called of this plain because it contains Teamhair or Tara, the seat of royalty. 🢀

  299. It would pass. This is in allusion to Brian's justice and the tranquillity of Ireland under his rule. 🢀

  300. A woman, &c. The same is said of the reign of Domhnall, son of Aedh, son of Ainmire, monarch of Ireland, from A.D. 628 to 642, and of Brian Borumha, monarch from A.D. 1002 to 1014. See Battle of Magh Rath, p. 104. 🢀

  301. Sliabh Callainn, i. e. Callann's mountain, (anglice Slieve Gallion) a mountain in the barony of Loughinsholin, county of Londonderry, and on the borders of the county of Tyrone. 🢀

  302. Coirrshliabh, i.e. the rugged mountain, (anglice the Curlieu hills,) on the borders of the counties of Roscommon and Sligo. 🢀

  303. Leath-Chuinn, i.e. Conn's half, i.e. the northern half of Ireland. 🢀

  304. The prop. This alludes to the construction of the ancient Irish wooden house or log house which was supported by a tur or gabhal fulaing. See Cormac's Glossary, in voce Tuirighen🢀

  305. i.e. the escape of Brian O'Neill would counterbalance the loss of all the rest of the chieftains who fell in this battle. This notion is not peculiar to our author. “Rex enim unus instar omnium est.” See Cambrensis Eversus, Dedication, p. vi. vii. 🢀

  306. i.e. the O'Neills and their correlatives. 🢀

  307. The soldiers of Eamhain, i.e. the men of Oirghialla. 🢀

  308. The first battle. This battle is not noticed in the Irish Annals. 🢀

  309. Beann Abhaidh. There is no place of this name in Ulster at present. It was probably the old name of Beann Aibhne in the barony of Keenaght, county of Londonderry. See Inbhear Abhaigh, note infra quatrain 54, p. 167.🢀

  310. Craebh-tulch a, i.e. the wide-spreading tree of the hill. This is probably the place now called Crewe, situate near Glenavey in the barony of Upper Massareene, and county of Antrim. This battle was fought in the year A.D. 1003 between the Cineal Eoghain and the Ulidians, in which the latter were defeated. 🢀

  311. Eochaidh. This was Eochaidh son of Ardghar, king of Ulidia or Eastern Ulster, who was slain by the Cineal Eoghain in the battle of Craebh-tuicha in 1003. 🢀

  312. Ath-solais, i.e. ford of the light. There are many places of this name in Ireland, but nothing has been discovered to identify the place here referred to, and no account of the battle is found in the Irish Annals. 🢀

  313. Rath-Bhoth, i.e. the rath of the booths or tents, now Raphoe, the head of an ancient bishoprick in the county of Donegal. No account of this battle is found in the Irish Annals. 🢀

  314. Sliabh-Toadh. Two battles were fought here by the ancestors of the O'Neills; one in A.D. 291, and the other in 610, [614.] It would appear from the Annals of Ulster that Sliabh Toadh was the mountain now called Bessy Bell, situate near Newtown- Stewart, in the county of Tyrone. 🢀

  315. Magh Maighne, in Munster. Not identified. 🢀

  316. q Sliabh- Caein. There is no mountain now bearing this name in Ulster. 🢀

  317. Moin-ghlas, i.e. green bog, now Monglass, in the county of Kildare. See Dinnseanchus. 🢀

  318. Dun-Droma Dairinne, i.e. the fort of Dairinne's ridge, (Dundrum,) in the barony of Lecale, county of Down. Here are the ruins of a strong castle of great antiquity, which occupies the site of the primitive dun, or earthen fort. This battle is not noticed in the Irish Annals. 🢀

  319. Loch Cuan, Lough Con or Strangford Lough in the county of Down. Strangford seems the Danish name, Strang-fiord, the strong firth. 🢀

  320. Formaeil, now Formil, in the parish of Lower Badoney, barony of Strabane and county of Tyrone. This battle was fought in the year 965 [966] between the Cineal Eoghain and Cineal Conaill, and the latter were defeated with the loss of their chief, Maelisa O'Canannain. See Annals of the Four Masters, A.D. 965, and Annals of Ulster 966. 🢀

  321. Caisbhearna. This battle is not noticed in the Irish Annals. This is probably the present Casorna, in the parish of Badoney, barony of Strabane and county of Tyrone. 🢀

  322. This alludes to a story given at full length in Mageoghegan's translation of the Annals of Clonmacnoise, which states that “Muircheartach of the Leather Coats carried off the body of Cearbhall, king of Leinster, and made a payre of tables of his bones, which for a long time after was kept as a monument in the king of Ulster's house.” See Annals of the Four Masters, Ed. J. O'D. A.D. 942, p. 650, a. 🢀

  323. The foreign race, i.e. the Danes of Dublin, who paid tribute to Muircheartach of the Leather Coats in 942. See Circuit of Muircheartach son of Niall, p. 33 35, and Annals of the Four Masters, A.D. 939, p. 642. 🢀

  324. Caiseal-Chuirc, i e. the city of Cashel in Munster. Id, ibid, pp. 41 43, and Annals of the Four Masters, A.D. 939, p. 643. 🢀

  325. In the Circuit of Muircheartach son of Niall it is stated that Ceallachan, king of Caiseal, was carried off as a hostage to Oileach with a ring of gold weighing fifteen ounces on his hand, and a chain of iron on his leg. Circuit, &c. p. 45. 🢀

  326. Ceann-coradh i.e. head of the weir, generally anglicized Kincora, was the name of the palace of the king of Thomond, situate at Killaloe, Co. of Clare, and celebrated in Irish history as the residence of the Irish monarch Brian Borumha. It is stated in the Circuit of Muircheartach son of Niall, (p. 47) that the northern forces of Muircheartach stopped a night here, but no allusion is made to their having burned the house. 🢀

  327. This Conchubhar or Conor is the progenitor of the O'Conors of Connaught. See Circuit of Muircheartach, pp. 48, 49. 🢀

  328. King of the foreigners, i.e. of the Danes of Dublin, whose king in Muircheartach's time was Blacar, and the hostages carried off by the northern prince whose name was Sitric, son of Sitric, and brother of the Godfrey who became king of the Danes of Dublin in the year 948. See Circuit of Muircheartach, pp. 34, 35, note 55. 🢀

  329. Loch Laeghaire, i.e. the lake of Laeghaire. This lake was called after Laeghaire Buadhach, or Leary the Victorious, one of the champions of the Craebh Ruadh or Red Branch in Ulster, in the first century, who had his residence at it. In later ages, as we learn from the Irish Annals, the head of the Slicht Airt Uí Néill, who were seated in the present barony of Strabane, County of Tyrone, resided at this lake. The name of this lake is now corrupted to Lough Mary. It is situate near Baron's Court, the seat of the Marquis of Abercorne, in the parish of Ardstraw, barony of Strabane and County of Tyrone. The change of names in this part of Ireland is remarkable, as appears from ancient maps of Ulster, such as Sliabh Truim to Bessy Bell, Loch Laeghaire to Lough Mary, &c. &c. They will be restored as soon as the Irish become national and rational by the force of education and true taste. 🢀

  330. A white wound is the mark of a stroke that does not cut or raise a lump. Head wound was the severest wound, without causing death or loss of a member.—Brehon Law🢀

  331. People slain in battle were buried by the ancient Irish on the north side of the church, which is still called taebh na bh-fear n-gonta, “the side of the slain men.” 🢀

  332. According to all the Irish Annals, Brian Borumha, monarch of Ireland, who was slain in the battle of Cluain-tarbh (Clontarf near Dublin,) in 1014, was buried at Armagh, and the Dublin copy of the Annals of Innisfallen adds “in a stone coffin separately on the north side of the Cathedral.” 🢀

  333. i.e. Mac Liag of Limerick. He was chief poet and secretary to the monarch Brian Borumha, of whom he is said to have written a life. See Mac Curtin's Antiquities, p. 214–217, and Hardiman's Irish Minstrelsy, vol. ii. p. 361. 🢀

  334. He was Brian Borumha's nephew, being the son of his brother Donnchuan. He was slain and beheaded in the battle of Cluaintarbh (Clontarf,) and his head was carried to Armagh and there interred. 🢀

  335. The battle Caeimh-Eirne, correctly, Caim-Eirge. This battle, which was fought in O'Neill's country between Brian O'Neill, and his rival Mac Lochlainn, is noticed in the Irish Annals, at the year 1241. See following Remarks. 🢀

  336. Maghnus, pronounced Manus. This name was borrowed by the Irish from the Danes. It is now common among both nations, and sometimes made Manasses by some of the Uí Cathain or O'Kanes. This Maghnus O'Cathain, who was lord or chief of Cianachta and Fir-na-Craeibhe in the present County of Londonderry, is usually styled Maghnus Catha Duin from his having fallen in this battle. He was the father of Cumhaighe-na-n-Gall O'Cathain, whose tomb is in the old church of Dungevin. 🢀

  337. See previous footnote. [BF] 🢀

  338. Eachmarcach. These six members of the O'Kane family were evidently heads of septs. It is stated in the Annals of Clonmacnoise and of the Four Masters, that fifteen of the chief men of the O'Cahans fell in this battle. See Annals of the Four Masters, Ed. J. O'D. A.D. 1260, note h. 🢀

  339. Inbhear-Abhaigh. This was probably the ancient name of the mouth of the river Roe, in the barony of Keenaght County of Londonderry. See Beann Abhaidh, note 307, supra. 🢀

  340. Niall Caille. He was the ancestor of Brian O'Neill and monarch of Ireland from A.D. 833 to 846, when he was drowned in the river Callan, near Armagh, from which he received the cognomen of Caille or Cailne.—Ogygia, p. 434. The following genealogical table is omitted in this edition. [BF] 🢀

  341. Amhlaeibh O'Gairmleadhaigh, would be anglicized Auliffe O'Gormley, but this family now generally write the name Gormley or Grumley without the prefix. This family was originally seated in Cineal Moen, on the west side of the River Foyle, in the present barony of Raphoe; but they were driven thence in the thirteenth century by the Cineal Conaill, when they settled on the other side of Foyle between Strabane and Derry. 🢀

  342. Malainn, now Malin in the barony of Inishowen, County of Donegal. 🢀

  343. Faendruim, probably Fordrum, a townland near Greencastle, adjoining Ballymacarter in the parish of Lower Moville, barony of Inishowen, County of Donegal. See Annals of the Four Masters, A.D. 1167. Ed. J. O'D. p. 1162. 🢀

  344. O'Duibhdhirma. This name is still extant in the barony of Inishowen, where it is anglicized Dooyearma by some, and incorrectly changed to Mac Dermot by others. The country of O'Duibhdhirma was called Breadach, and comprised about the eastern half of the peninsula of Inis Eoghain, where its name is still preserved in Bredach Glyn, and the little river Bredach flowing through it and falling into Lough Foyle at the village of Moville. “Bredach est fluviolus peninsulae de Inis-Eoguin, qui in sinum de Loch Febhuil apud Magh-bile exoneratur.” Colgan, Trias Thaumaturga pp. 145, 181. According to the Annals of Ulster and the Annals of the Four Masters, Conchobhar O'Duibhdhirma and his son Aedh were slain in this battle. 🢀

  345. Cian. His surname was O'h-Inneirghe according to the Irish Annals. He was of the race of Brian, son of Eoghan, and chief of Gleann Concadhain or Glcnconkeine, comprising the parishes of Ballynascreen, Kilcronaghan and Desertmartin, in the present barony of Loughinsholin, Co. of Londonderry. The late Dr. Henery of Maghera, in the County of Londonderry, was of this family, and there are several respectable persons of the name in the parishes above mentioned and throughout Ulster, but none at present inheriting landed estates. The burial place of this family was in the church of Ballynascreen, See Annals of the Four Masters Ed. J. O'D. A.D. 1192, 92. 🢀

  346. Donnsleibhe Mac Cana, would now be anglicized Donlevy Mac Cann. This family was seated in the territory of Clann-Breasail, on the south side of Lough Neagh where it receives the upper Bann. The late Major Mac Cann was the reputed head of this family. 🢀

  347. Eamhain, now called the Navan fort near Armagh. 🢀

  348. Cu Uladh O'h-Anluain, would be now anglicized Cooley O'Hanlon; the name Cu Uladh, which is translated Canis Ultoniae by the compiler of the Annals of Ulster, is very common among the families of Oirghialla. O'h-Anluain, (O'Hanlon) was chief of the Eastern portion of Oirghialla, called Crich na n-Airthear, regio Orientalium, a name which is still retained in the baronies of Orior in the east of the County of Armagh. The head of this family in the time of James II. was Brian O'h-Anluain, commonly called “the Colonel”, who was the son of Glaisne, son of Patrick Ban, son of Edmond Laidir, son of Eochaidh, who was attainted by Act of Parliament as “Oghie Oge O'Hanlon, esquire, eldest son of Sir Oghie O'Hanlon, knight, late of Tonregye [Tandragee] in the County of Armagh.” 🢀

  349. Mac Lochlainn, now anglicized Mac Loughlin, a name still numerous in the barony of Inishowen. This family had been the most distinguished of the race of Eoghan till the year 1241, when they were defeated and set aside by the O'Neills. See Annals of the Four Masters. Ed. J. O'D. A.D. 1241, p. 303. If Diarmaid Mac Lochlainn had survived this battle he would probably have succeeded Brian O'Neill in the chieftainship of the Cineal-Eoghain. 🢀

  350. Conchubhar, son of Niall O'Neill. He was the brother of Brian O'Neill. His name is not given in the Irish Annals, as having fallen in this battle. 🢀

  351. Carn Meadhbha, i.e. the carn or sepulchral heap of Meadhbh, the celebrated queen of Connacht in the first century. It is here used to designate Cruachan, where she was interred, and where the kings of Connacht anciently had their residence. 🢀

  352. The son of Tighearnan. He was Cathal son of Tighearnan O'Conchobhair (O'Conor) according to all the Irish Annals. 🢀

  353. Son of Cormac. This should be “grandson of Cormac.” He was Gillachrist, son of Conchobhar, son of Cormac Mac Diarmada, or O'Mailruanaidh, lord of Magh Luirg, now the plains of Boyle in the County of Roscommon. 🢀

  354. O'Maeilsheachlainn of Midhe, i.e. O'Melaghlin of Meath. No mention is made of him in the Irish Annals as having fallen in this battle. O'Melaghlin was the chief of the southern Uí Néill, and one of the most powerful princes of the Race of Conn Céadchathach. 🢀

  355. O'Duibheamhna, now Devany. Not mentioned in the Irish Annals, 🢀

  356. O'Duibhlin. This should be O'Dobhailen, now anglicized Devlin, He was chief of Muintir-Dobhailen or Muntrevelin, a district on the west side of Lough Neagh. This chief is not mentioned in the Irish Annals. 🢀

  357. Ruaidhri. Not mentioned in the Irish Annals. 🢀

  358. This is a figure sometimes used to denote an omen of slaughter. As a heavy drop indicates an approaching great shower, so the fall of Ruaidhri O'Gairmleadhaigh foreboded the losses of the Race of Eoghan in this battle. 🢀

  359. O'Neill the great and his Son. Domhnall and Aedh. It is not easy to understand from this quatrain whether or not these were slain in this battle. Domhnall was probably Domhnall Og, the cousin-german of Brian O'Neill, and Aedh was Aedh Buidhe the First, the ancestor of the O'Neills of Clann Aedha Bhuidhe (Clannaboy.) This Aedh was lord of all the Cineal Eoghain, and is called King of Aileagh in Mageoghegan's translation of the Annals of Clonmacnoise. He was not slain in the battle of Dun, but survived it for thirteen years, for he was killed, according to all the Annals, in the year 1283 by Brian Mac Mahon, chief of Oirghialla. 🢀

  360. Diseart of Doire Chalgaigh, i.e. the hermitage of Doire-Chalgaigh. This was the name of a church at Derry (Londonderry.) See Annals of Four Masters, AD. 1122, and Colgan's Trias Thaumaturga p. 504. 🢀

  361. O'Laibheartaigh, now anglicized Laverty and Lafferty. O'Laverty was a distinguished chief of the Race of Eoghan. Ardghal O'Laverty, the lamp of the valor and hospitality of the north of Ireland, died in the year 1241, according to the Annals of Four Masters🢀

  362. Brighid of Cill-dara, i.e. St. Bridget of Kildare. She is probably invoked here because she was buried at Dún dá Leathghlas, (Downpatrick,) where this battle was fought. 🢀

  363. Girdle. For some stories of the miraculous zone or girdle of St. Bridget see her lives published by Colgan🢀

  364. The following paragraph is omitted. Please refer to the CELT edition of The Annals of Ulster, volume 2 (file T100001B), entry U1260.1 🢀

  365. For full text see CELT edition in file L100011, entry 1260.1. 🢀

  366. For full text see CELT edition in file L100001, entry AG1259. 🢀

  367. For full text see CELT edition in file L100012 Annales Breves Hiberniae, entry 1258.1. 🢀

  368. Eoin Masach O'Maethagain, i.e. John the thick-thighed O'Meehagan. Nothing has been discovered to prove the period of this poet, or the pedigree of his hero. From the date of the vellum MS. from which it has been transcribed, (H. 4. 22, TCD) it would appear that Diarmaid O'h-Eidirsceoil whose death is here lamented, was the son of Conchobhar, chief of Corca-Laidhe, who died in the year 1508. H. 2. 14, p. 94, vellum. 🢀

  369. This is carrying the technical language of plundering into religious sentiment. Christ went out on a preying excursion, and taking O'h-Eidirsceoil prisoner, carried him off, a royal captive, to his heavenly fort! 🢀

  370. I received too much indulgence from O'h-Eidirsceoil, and committed sin by following the bent of my own will. Now that I am left forlorne, do thou, O God, take vengeance of me for my former indulgences. 🢀

  371. This poem was composed by Teige O'Daly, who was one of the O'Daly's of Carbery, on the death of Sir Finghin O'h-Eidirsceoil, or Sir Florence O'Driscoll, who was chief of Collymore in 1585, and was living in 1614. This poet is mentioned in O'Reilly's Catalogue of Irish writers under A.D. 1602, as the author of an elegy on the death of Owen O'Sullivan, and under 1618 as the author of an elegy on the death of Dermod O'Sullivan, who died in that year. 🢀

  372. Sir Finghin or Florence O'Driscoll was the head of this family and was knighted. He was loyal all his life till he joined in Tyrone's rebellion, but after the defeat of the Irish at Kinsale, he was pardoned for politic reasons. See the Pacata Hibernia, book 2, c. xxx. 🢀

  373. i.e. Munster. 🢀

  374. The Editor has not been able to find any other authority for these statements. 🢀

  375. This Conchobhar never returned to Ireland, nor did his heir ever recover the patrimony of Sir Finghin in Collymore. See Smith's Cork, (ubi supra)🢀

  376. i.e. Sir Finghin or Florence O'Driscoll, who was the son of Johanna, daughter to Conchobhar Finn O'Mathghamhna, (Conor Finn O'Mahony). He was at this time a very old man. 🢀

  377. i.e. Eibhilin, daughter of Sir Owen Mac Carthy, and wife of Sir Finghin O'Driscoll. 🢀

  378. i.e. in the swimming of the two birds. This was the old name of that part of the river Shannon lying between Cluain-mic-Nois and Cluain-Boirinn, between the King's county and the county of Roscommon. See Tribes and Customs of Ui-Maine, p. 5, note f. But the name is probably here intended for Loch-dá-éan now Loch Macnean in Fermanagh. 🢀

  379. Oilean or Ellen, the wife of Sir Florence O'Driscoll was the daughter of Sir Owen Mac Carthy Reagh. Ellen or Eibhilin, her mother, was daughter of Diarmaid O'Ceallachain or Dermot O'Callaghan. Her grandmother was Eleanor Fitzgerald, daugher of Gerald 8th Earl of Kildare. See MS. Harleian 1425, p. 21. 🢀

  380. i.e. Magh Line, a plain in the present county of Antrim, extending from Loch Neagh to near Carrickfergus. It is here put for Uladh or Ulster. 🢀

  381. For some account of this poet and some of his other productions the reader is referred to O'Reilly's Catalogue of Irish writers, A.D. 1617. This poem was composed by him for Conchobhar or Cornelius O'Driscoll, (son of Sir Finghin or Florence,) and his wife Eibhilin, the daughter of Domhnall, son of Eoghan Mac Suibhne of Muskerry. 🢀

  382. The Race of Ith, i.e. the O'Driscolls and their correlatives. 🢀

  383. i.e. the Mac Carthys, O'Briens, O'Sullivans, and their correlatives in Munster. 🢀

  384. i.e. the Magennis's, Mac Artains, and their correlatives in East Ulster, also the O'Conors of Kerry and Corcomroe, and the Mac Rannalls of Muinter Eolais, and the O'Farrell's of Annaly. 🢀

  385. i.e. the O'Neills and O'Donnells of Ulster, the O'Conors of Connaught, the Mac Murroughs, O'Conors Faly, &c, of Leinster. 🢀

  386. i.e. by the historical knowledge of their chief poet. 🢀

  387. i.e. Ireland. The Irish poets were accustomed to form names for Ireland by prefixing Fonn, Magh, Crich, or Tir, to the names of any of her celebrated monarchs, as in the present instance from Cobhthach Gael m-Breagh, A.M. 4609, Four Masters. O'Flaherty in treating of the different names of Ireland notices this custom in the following words:
    “Denique non raro a poetis patriis quorundam celebriorum Insulae regum adjectis nominibus, hujus, vel illius regis (expresso nomine) regio, plaga, terra, campus, regia, curia, aut quid simile cognominatur; ut in sequentibus ex Hugone O'Donnnelli filio.” […]Ogygia, p. 19. 🢀

  388. i.e. the river Boyne, in the region traversed by which the old English were exclusively seated. 🢀

  389. i.e. the O'Driscolls and their correlatives. 🢀

  390. Corcach, i.e. the City of Cork. The poet here argues that the race of Lughaidh were entitled to the monarchy, and that therefore they had as much right to Cashel, Naas, and Dublin, as they had to Cork or Dunboy. 🢀

  391. i.e. the City of Cashel. 🢀

  392. Teffia, a large territory in Westmeath. 🢀

  393. i.e. Naas, one of the ancient seats of the Kings of Leinster. 🢀

  394. Ath-Cliath, i.e. Dublin. 🢀

  395. That is the lands belonging to the Castle of Dun-Baei, or Dunboy, then belonging to the O'Sullivans Beare of the race of Eibhear, but originally a part of Corca Laidhe, the territory of the O'Driscolls. The Irish called Dursey Island, Oilean Baei Bheirre. See O'Sullivan Beare's Historiae Catholicae Iberniae compendium lib. viii. c. 3. and Pacata Hibernia, vol. ii. p. 563, and Annals of the Four Masters, A.D. 1602. 🢀

  396. i.e. Rathcroghan, near Belanagare in the county of Roscommon. 🢀

  397. Aileach or Oileach, now Ellagh, near the city of Londonderry, in the barony of Inishowen, county of Donegal, one of the ancient seats of the Kings of Ulster and of the monarchs of Ireland. 🢀

  398. His own fortress. There are various accounts of this discovery of Ireland by Ith, the uncle of Milesius of Spain, given in Irish MSS. as in the Book of Leacan, fol. 12, and in the Book of Ballymote (fol.{}), and in the Annals of Clonmacnoise as translated by Connell Mageoghegan. See also Dr. Todd's Edition of Nennius's Historia Britonum, p. 241 which is online at CELT; file T100028 contains the English text referred to; file G100028 has the Irish text.[…] 🢀

  399. Ith, son of Bile. This should be Ith, brother of Bile, son of Breogan. 🢀

  400. i.e. the plain of Ith, a level tract of country in the barony of Raphoe and County of Donegal. The river Finn flows through it. 🢀

  401. These were Mac Cuill, Mac Cecht and Mac Greine, three Tuatha De Danann chiefs who had governed Ireland alternately year about, immediately preceding the Scotic Gadelian or Milesian invasion. See Keating's History of Ireland (Haliday's Edition, p. 213, 265); the Leabhar Gabhala of the O'Clery's and Annals of the Four Masters, A.M. 3500, Ed. J. O.D. p. 25. 🢀

  402. i.e. the son of Ith. See Keating's History of Ireland (Haliday's Edition, p. 285, 303, et sequen🢀

  403. recte brother of Bile. 🢀

  404. i.e. of Domhnall, son of Eoghan Mac Suibhne of Muskerry. 🢀

  405. i.e. Satirists, who were believed to possess the power of bringing out fearbae or blotches through the face of any one who deserved their satire. 🢀

  406. Plain of Modhuirn, a plain in the County of Tyrone, through which the river Modhurn flows. It is here used in a very vague sense, but it is probably intended to suggest that the Mac Suibhnes are originally of Tir Eoghain, (not Tir Conaill, in which they had been settled for several centuries) being descended from the celebrated Flaithbheartach an trostáin Ó Néill, King of Aileach, who died A.D. 1036. 🢀

  407. Pages 401 to 403 containing genealogical trees are not reproduced; please consult the .pdf version of O'Donovan's Genealogies; the reference is provided in the header. [BF] 🢀

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